In Vancouver, a Climate Program That’s All About the Neighbors

Read the full story at CityLab.

For all the work that goes into building climate action plans, cities often run up against one problem: Many well-meaning residents are stuck in the same old habits, unsure of how to make meaningful change.

In Vancouver, the solution is starting small. About two and a half years ago, some residents in the Riley Park neighborhood wanted to put the city’s Greenest City Action Plan to work in their community. With support from Evergreen and a grant from the city, they created the Green Bloc initiative and set an ambitious goal: to decrease the carbon footprint of participating households by 25 percent.

Urban heat islands: cooling things down with trees, green roads and fewer cars

Read the full story in The Guardian.

As city temperatures rise, with a negative impact on health, councils are coming up with some innovative solutions.

NOAA 2017 Coastal Resilience Grants

NOAA is dedicated to investing in the tools and resources communities and businesses need to address the impacts of extreme weather and climate-related hazards, as well as to restore coastal habitat to enhance the resilience of coastal ecosystems and the communities that rely on them. NOAA has developed the Coastal Resilience Grants Program to strengthen our economy and provide sustainable and lasting benefits.

This competition represents the integration of two existing grant programs: the Coastal Ecosystem Resiliency Grants Program administered by NOAA Fisheries, and the Regional Coastal Resilience Grants Program administered by NOAA’s National Ocean Service. The competition will fund projects that build resilience, including activities that protect life and property, safeguard people and infrastructure, strengthen the economy, or conserve and restore coastal and marine resources.

The NOAA Coastal Resilience Grants Program will support two categories of activities: strengthening coastal communities and habitat restoration. Applicants can now submit proposals for both categories through the same funding opportunity.

  1. Strengthening Coastal Communities: activities that improve capacity of multiple coastal jurisdictions (states, counties, municipalities, territories, and tribes) to prepare and plan for, absorb impacts of, recover from, and/or adapt to extreme weather events and climate-related hazards.
  2. Habitat Restoration: activities that restore habitat to strengthen the resilience of coastal ecosystems and decrease the vulnerability of coastal communities to extreme weather events and climate-related hazards.

Eligible applicants include nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, regional organizations, private entities, and local, state, and tribal governments. The FY’17 Federal Funding Opportunity was modified on February 14, 2017, to state that applicants may conduct projects in the District of Columbia, however may only submit applications for the Habitat Restoration category, as authorized under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act, 16 U.S.C. 1891a and Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1535. Typical award amounts will range from $250,000 to $1 million for projects lasting up to three years. Cost-sharing through cash or in-kind contributions is expected. Projects must be located in one or more of the 35 U.S. coastal states or territories.

Climate Change and New Efforts to Help People Understand What They Can’t See

Read the full story in Governing.

Visual illustrations can give meaning to overwhelming emissions numbers.

This Chart Illustrates Why Infrastructure Investment Is a Good Idea

Read the full story in Pacific Standard.

Earlier this week, the Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution held an event exploring the ins and outs of infrastructure investment. While a panel full of superstar economists agreed that the United States is approaching full employment and doesn’t need much in the way of fiscal stimulus right now, they nonetheless argued that government investment in infrastructure might still be a good idea. As illustrated by the chart below, which comes from a framing paper that the Hamilton Project released in advance of the event, the U.S. is just not spending nearly enough money on infrastructure.

Density Is The Best Way To Reduce A City’s Carbon Footprint

Read the full story at Fast Company.

Ending sprawl could be even more important than applying the latest energy-saving technologies as cities look to incorporate more energy-efficient buildings.