Champaign-Urbana: Paper2Tree, a new University-Community partnership, launches today

Via Smile Politely.

The University of Illinois has teamed up with the community to introduce a new partnership, Paper2Tree, which launches today.

Founded by Mattia Gazzola, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Paper2Tree will connect researchers in the University with members of the community and the environment by encouraging anyone who publishes a scientific paper to plant a tree in one of the participating local parks.

Trees will be associated to the publication reference, geo-localized, and visualized on a map — all data to be made publicly available, along with tree species, scientific area, and associated university department.

Paper2Tree has also partnered with the Champaign Park DistrictUrbana Park District,the Cities of Champaign and Urbana, Champaign and Urbana School districts, along with many university units, including the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, the Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment, and others.

Stanford professor files $10 million lawsuit against scientific journal over clean energy claims

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

Mark Z. Jacobson, a Stanford University professor who has prominently contended that the United States can fully power itself with wind, water and solar energy, is suing the National Academy of Sciences and the lead author of a study published in its flagship journal that criticized Jacobson’s views — pushing an already bitter academic dispute into a courtroom setting.

German researchers resign from Elsevier journals in push for nationwide open access

Read the full story in Science.

Five leading German scientists have resigned from their editorial positions at journals published by Elsevier, the latest step in a battle over open-access and subscription policies between the Dutch publishing giant and a consortium of German libraries, universities, and research institutes.

The researchers want Elsevier to accept a new payment model that would make all papers authored by Germany-based researchers open access. The five are only the first of many ready to step down, warn leaders of the consortium, called Projekt DEAL.

New IMLS-funded project: Opening access to 20th century public domain serials

Read the full post from Everybody’s Libraries.

I’m happy to report that over the next year, I and others at Penn will be working on a project that the Institute of Museum and Library Services has just funded to help open access to the vast public domain of 20th century serials.  We’ll be developing and demonstrating data sets and procedures to make it much easier to verify public domain status for content in scholarly journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and special interest periodicals published in the United States.  We hope that all kinds of libraries can take advantage of the resources we provide to make materials like this in their collections available online to all, and digitally preserve them for posterity.

A Few Bad Scientists Are Threatening to Topple Taxonomy

Read the full story in Scientific American.

Naming species forms the foundation of biology—but these rogue researchers are exposing the flaws in the system.

A “Botanist’s Botanist” : The Field Books of Timothy Plowman

Read the full story from the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

The Field Museum Library has recently digitized and added to the Biodiversity Heritage Library Timothy Plowman’s entire field book collection, which spans his career from 1969, when he worked for the botanical museum at Harvard, through his years as a curator of botany at the Field Museum from 1976-1987. Timothy Plowman was an ethnobotanist and the world authority on the taxon Erythroxylum(coca). This genus of tropical trees and shrubs is best known for the species Erythroxylum coca L., a sacred leaf of the Andes, and also the source from which commercial cocaine is derived.

A Confusion of Journals — What Is PubMed Now?

Read the full post from Scholarly Kitchen.

What is PubMed? Is it a search engine? A credentialing system? A filter? Is it a publisher? An enabler of open access (OA) publishing? A technology provider? A competitor? Depending on the situation, you can answer each of the above in the affirmative, despite the contradictions many of the combinations may cause.