Eileen Fisher has designs on keeping clothing out of landfills

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Buying recycled items from trusted retailers is the next big fashion trend — and saves billions of tons of clothing from going to waste.

Trash to treasure: the social enterprises transforming recycling

Read the full story in The Guardian.

Convincing companies to buy back their own rubbish sounds like an unlikely business model – yet the Melbourne social enterprise Green Collect has found a way to make it work.

Companies in the city’s office towers pay Green Collect to take away hard-to-recycle waste. Green Collect then employs socially disadvantaged people to refashion it into something useful and then sells it back to the companies that threw it out. It’s a double whammy. As social enterprise expert Prof Jo Barraket says: “It doesn’t get much better than that.”

Social enterprises such as Green Collect exist to solve social, environmental, cultural or economic problems. They aim to be self-sustaining and at least 50% of their profits are ploughed back into their mission. “And that capacity of being able to find latent value is really a characteristic of all social enterprises,” says Barraket, director of the Centre for Social Impact Swinburne.

Kimberly-Clark Recycling Program Helps Two Midwestern Universities Turn Used Gloves into Durable Goods

Read the full story at Waste360.

The Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC) at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Purdue University have diverted almost six tons of waste from landfills through a recycling program that turns used lab gloves and garments into shelving, flowerpots and lawn and garden furniture.

Recycling Economic Information (REI) Report

The Recycling Economic Information (REI) Report aims to increase the understanding of the economic implications of material reuse and recycling. How our society uses materials is fundamental to our economic and environmental future. Global competition for finite resources will intensify as world population and economies grow. More productive and less impactful use of materials helps our society remain economically competitive, contributes to our prosperity and protects the environment in a resource-constrained future. By converting waste materials into valuable raw materials, recycling creates jobs, builds more competitive manufacturing industries and significantly contributes to the U.S. economy. For more information, visit https://www.epa.gov/smm/recycling-economic-information-rei-report.

New Call2Recycle Study Highlights the Importance of Accessibility in Driving Recycling Behavior

Read the full story from Environmental Leader.

Ask consumers why they don’t recycle and the number one complaint is simple: It’s inconvenient. You have to collect it. You have to store it. If it isn’t paper, glass, aluminum or recycled curbside, you have to haul it somewhere. For recyclables that aren’t part of a curbside recycling program, action requires a commitment of time and effort.

But change may be on the way. In a recent online Nielsen survey of 6,000 North American consumers, the respondents who didn’t recycle regularly indicated that they would if it was more convenient. The survey, commissioned by Call2Recycle® North America’s first and largest consumer battery stewardship program, also confirmed progress in the adoption of battery recycling, with more than half of respondents professing awareness of battery programs. Making battery recycling convenient for people throughout North America has been a primary focus for Call2Recycle for the past two decades.

Curbside Textile Recycling Could be the Next Big Thing

Read the full story at Waste360.

At the ReuseConex conference in Boston, presenters will be leading discussions on how they recycle textiles and create innovative products.

Recovering and recycling paper has saved energy

Read the full story from the Energy Information Administration.

The recovery, or recycling, of paper and paperboard has increased from 34% of supply in 1990 to 67% of supply in 2015. Most of this recovered paper is consumed in the United States, but some is exported. Based on data from the American Forest and Paper Association, domestic consumption of recovered paper at U.S. mills increased to 31 million tons in 2015, while net recovered paper exports increased to 21 million tons.