Michigan paper mill finds new solution for residuals

Read the full story at Resource Recycling.

Collaboration between an industry group and several Michigan organizations helped Great Lakes Tissue think outside the carton when it comes to its use of recycled material.

Michigan-based Great Lakes Tissue teamed up with the Carton Council of North America, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) to purchase new equipment that cuts down the amount of residuals generated by the toilet paper and tissue manufacturer.

The work also helps boost recycling of all components of recovered food and beverage cartons, which can contain plastic and aluminum along with the fiber that is used to make most of the packaging.

“We don’t want to just say cartons are recyclable, but it’s just the fiber,” said Jason Pelz, vice president of recycling projects for Carton Council of North America. “We want to say the whole thing is.”

U.S. Department of Energy will fund applied research and development to accelerate decarbonization of American industry

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) recently announced its intent to issue a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) that will support DOE’s efforts to decarbonize the American industrial sector and move the U.S. toward net-zero carbon emissions.  

The industrial sector currently accounts for one third of domestic, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. DOE’s new FOA will support the advancement of a range of decarbonization technologies that can shrink the carbon footprint of America’s vital industries.  

Decarbonizing industry presents a difficult challenge, given the wide range of energy inputs and complexity of industrial processes. It will require the U.S. to pursue multiple strategies in parallel. DOE has identified four key pathways to industrial decarbonization: energy efficiency; industrial electrification; low carbon fuels, feedstocks, and energy sources; and carbon capture, utilization, and storage. 

The “Industrial Efficiency and Decarbonization FOA” is expected to include the following topics, applying the four industrial decarbonization pathways to energy-intensive American industries where decarbonization technologies could have the greatest impact:  

  • Decarbonizing Chemicals: This topic will focus on unit operations, including advanced separations and advanced reactors, and alternative production and process heating technologies to reduce carbon impacts from the production of high-volume chemicals.
  • Decarbonizing Iron and Steel: This topic will focus on advancements that enable decarbonization in ore-based or scrap-based iron and steelmaking operations, and that convert other existing iron and steelmaking ancillary and thermal processes to use clean fuels or electricity.
  • Decarbonizing Food and Beverage Products: This topic will focus on innovative technologies that decarbonize process heating operations within the food and beverage sector.
  • Decarbonizing Cement and Concrete: This topic will focus on next generation cement formulations and process routes, utilization of low carbon fuels, and carbon capture technologies.
  • Decarbonizing Paper and Forest Products: This topic will focus on novel paper and wood drying technologies, and innovative pulping and paper forming technologies.
  • Cross-sector Decarbonization Technologies: This topic will focus on innovations in low temperature waste heat to power, thermal energy storage, and industrial heat pump technologies. 

DOE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office plans to issue the FOA via EERE Exchange in August 2022. EERE envisions awarding multiple financial assistance awards in the form of cooperative agreements. The estimated period of performance for each award will be approximately 24-36 months.

For more information about this NOI, visit the Advanced Manufacturing Office website.

A circular model

Read the full story at Recycling Today.

DS Smith employs its circular approach to recycling and packaging production as a model for future North American growth.

This company crushes old roads—and rebuilds them to store carbon

Read the full story at Fast Company.

For stabilizing roads, Carbon Crusher ditches bitumen, a byproduct of crude oil, for lignin, sourced from trees.

Jet fuel from paper industry waste could make airplanes cleaner

Read the full story at Anthropocene.

Why burn lignin when you could use it to fly an airplane? Research shows lignin-based jet fuel performs better with lower emissions than petro-fuels.

To use fewer trees and less water, this paper is made from grass

Read the full story at Fast Company.

Processing wood into paper requires a lot of water, energy, and chemicals. Creapaper mixes in grass, reducing the need for trees—and all the resources necessary to process them.

Coalition of multinational companies issues report on reducing deforestation

Read the full story in Food Business News.

A coalition of 20 global retailers and manufacturers, including PepsiCo, Inc., Nestle SA and Mondelez International, on Sept. 23 published its first annual report detailing progress in reducing deforestation.

P&G stuck in the past in a shifting tissue marketplace

Read the full story from NRDC.

The 2021 Issue With Tissue scorecard shows many companies have made major shifts toward sustainability, but laggards like Procter & Gamble (P&G) remain stuck in the past.

Are recyclers really saving the trees?

Read the full story at Waste360.

Whether you’re a veteran or a new convert it’s likely that the beneficial outcomes motivated you to recycle. You may have discovered that recycling a specific material saves millions of gallons of water. Maybe you were surprised to learn that it could conserve enough fuel to fire up all your neighborhood’s propane grills for the next century.

For the past thirty years, we’ve been told by the paper and paperboard industry that by recycling 2,000 pounds of newsprint we could save 17 trees. That figure varies slightly depending on the type of paper produced, but the idea remains the same. According to the American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) the United States now recovers 67% of all paper and paperboard produced. Apparently, the messaging was successful. Who doesn’t want to save trees? After all, we’re the only ones who can prevent forest fires, right? Well, maybe not.

Webinar: The Path to Sustainable Forestry

June 3, 2021, noon-1 pm CDT
Register here.

The forest industry is embracing more sustainable practices that protect people, biodiversity and our climate – and many companies have set goals to source from more sustainable forests. The challenge? Only 20% of the world’s working forests are currently certified by the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®). This webcast will cover the importance of sustainable forestry and how companies across the pulp and lumber industries are using their influence to increase the demand and supply of FSC-certified forest products.

Among the topics

  • How to achieve sustainability goals when issues of supply are outside of your direct control
  • Best practices for communicating the importance of certification schemes to suppliers
  • Tips for educating and inspiring consumers to choose responsibly sourced items
  • How to meaningfully contribute to NGO partnerships and collaborations that can drive continued progress

Moderator

  • Heather Clancy, Vice President & Editorial Director, GreenBiz Group

Speakers

  • Lois Forde-Kohler, Family Care Sustainability Director, Procter & Gamble
  • Ron Jarvis, Chief Sustainability Officer, The Home Depot
  • Chris McLaren, Chief Marketing & Market Development Officer, Forest Stewardship Council US