Corporate Procurement Officers Say Sustainability Now Key Criteria For Purchases

Read the full story at Ecosystem Marketplace.

More and more companies are incorporating sustainability criteria into their procurement activities, according to new research released February 7.

The 2017 Sustainable Procurement Barometer, published jointly by Paris-based sustainability consultancy EcoVadis, and the Hautes études commerciales de Paris (HEC Paris) business school, is the first Barometer report since 2013, and it shows a sharp increase in sustainability awareness. The findings echo those of the Forest Trends Supply Change project, which shows steadily increasing corporate action to halt deforestation.

Climate mitigation set to help air pollution

Read the full story at Environmentalresearchweb.

Reigning in both climate change and air pollution is crucial if we are to maintain the planet as a healthy and comfortable environment for humans. But how well do the separate policies for these issues work together? A team from Europe, the US and Japan has investigated.

Study of fracking in four states uncovers over 6,600 spills

Read the full interview at ResearchGate.

A new study investigating spills from hydraulically fractured oil and gas uncovered 6,648 spills in just four states over a ten-year period. Part of the SNAP Partnership, the study examined data from Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania. Significant differences in reporting requirements across states made this analysis difficult. Lauren Patterson, a water policy specialist at Duke University, and her coauthors say making this kind of state-level data more uniform and transparent would help regulators and industry reduce the number of incidents. We spoke with her to learn more.

Don’t Believe the “Job Killer” Hype: Decades of Economic Research Show that Environmental Regulations are Good for the Economy

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When Donald Trump announced that he had picked billionaire investor Carl Icahn as a special adviser on regulation, he said that Icahn would be a “leader in helping American entrepreneurs shed job-killing regulations that stifle economic growth.” And there it is again. The perennial bogeyman. The mythological notion that regulations are bad for jobs and the economy has been repeatedly debunked, but it keeps coming back. This report reviews the evidence, and shows, once again, that there is no truth to the idea of “job-killing” regulations. In fact, decades of economic research demonstrate that the economic impact of environmental regulations has been overwhelmingly positive.

How untreated water is making our kids sick: FSU researcher explores possible climate change link

Read the full story from Florida State University.

A Florida State University researcher has drawn a link between the impact of climate change and untreated drinking water on the rate of gastrointestinal illness in children.

Assistant Professor of Geography Chris Uejio has published a first-of-its-kind study, “Drinking-water treatment, climate change, and childhood gastrointestinal illness projections for northern Wisconsin (USA) communities drinking untreated groundwater,” in the Hydrogeology Journal. The study explores the benefits of additional drinking water treatment compared to the risks created by climate change. 

BIER Issues Results of 2016 Water and Energy Use Benchmarking Study

The Beverage Industry Environmental Roundtable (BIER) released their 2016 Water and Energy Use Benchmarking Study, celebrating their ninth benchmarking report on key performance data within the industry. Findings of the study substantiate the beverage industry’s ongoing efforts to better understand and reduce resource use on a global scale. Nineteen companies participated in this study, providing valuable quantitative insight for nearly 1,500 facilities across six continents.

The 2016 benchmarking study includes water and energy data from 2011, 2013, and 2015, representing a diverse variety of facility types, production sizes, and geographic locations from around the globe. Of the facilities that provided all three years of data, 71% achieved an improvement in water use ratio and 64% achieved an improvement in energy use ratio. The study presents several key takeaways; for example, results show an increase in the use of renewable energy sources. This helps illustrate the proactive approach the beverage industry is taking to improve business practices, understand industry challenges, and lessen environmental impacts.

“The BIER benchmarking study continues to be a valuable resource for beverage industry leaders evaluating energy and water use within their companies,” says Laura Nelson, Consultant for Antea Group and BIER Benchmarking Project Manager. “The report shows continued dedication to transparency in the industry, making this comprehensive study an invaluable resource.”

Moving forward, BIER plans to work with member companies on carbon emissions data to improve the quality and depth of data collected for future benchmarking purposes.

The complete 2016 benchmarking results report can be downloaded at http://www.bieroundtable.com/benchmarking-coeu.

ISTC Fact Sheet: Illinois Shop Towel Rule

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Shop towels and wipes utilized by businesses are commonly used in conjunction with solvents or other materials that contain solvents. These items are commonly generated by businesses after being used for cleaning purposes and other maintenance activities. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) issued a rule in 2013 specifically ordering the proper management and disposal of contaminated shop towels, referred to as the “Solvent Contaminated Wipes Rule”, or the “Shop Towel Rule”.