Celebrating #P2Week

In celebration of Pollution Prevention Week, the GLRPPR Blog has been posting about pollution prevention resources. Posts include:

Warriors Against Waste: These Restaurants And Bars Are Aiming For Zero

Read the full story from NPR.

Zero waste has become a sort of buzzword in the foodie world recently. From San Francisco to New York, London to Amsterdam, restaurateurs are challenging themselves to reduce the staggering amount of food waste that the industry generates (an estimated 571,000 tons annually by U.S. restaurants alone) and the amount of other resources they use — including electricity and water. From rejecting plastic straws to making byproducts like whey the star of a meal — restaurants are approaching that challenge in different ways.

Celebrate Pollution Prevention Week (September 17-23, 2017)

In 1990, Congress passed the Pollution Prevention Act. Pollution Prevention (P2) Week, celebrated during the third week of September each year (September 17-23, 2017),  highlights the efforts of EPA, its state partners, industry, and the public in preventing pollution right from the start.

Beginning Monday, the Great Lakes Pollution Prevention Roundtable (GLRPPR) will be publishing a P2 related blog post each day and will also be spreading the P2 message on Twitter using the hashtag #P2Week.

The  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have information about events occurring throughout the country. The National Pollution Prevention Roundtable also has a handy P2 Week Toolkit from 2014 for organizations looking for ways to participate.

Within the region, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management will hold its 20th Annual Pollution Prevention Conference and Trade Show on September 19-20 in Plainfield, IN. The theme is “Celebrating 20 Years of Pollution Prevention in Indiana.” The conference will also include presentations of the Governor’s Awards for Environmental Excellence.

Managing Risk Through Pollution Prevention, a full-day workshop held on the day before the IDEM conference, will lead companies to a better understanding of environmental risk management and how to reduce those risks with pollution prevention techniques. The day will combine lecture with hands on exercises to lead the group towards identification of specific practices they can undertake at their facilities to reduce risk.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has compiled a P2 Week Planner, which includes a sample resolution and press release.

‘Zero-Waste’ Efforts May Lead Sports Stadiums Astray, Study Suggests

Read the full story from Environmental Leader. Read the full study here.

Sporting venues interested in reducing GHG emissions, energy use, and trips to the landfill may actually be shortchanging themselves by focusing too closely on the concept of reaching “zero waste,” according to researchers at the University of Missouri (Mizzou). Rather, two specific aspects of waste reduction seem to far outweigh the rest in terms of reducing emissions or energy use: eliminating edible food waste, and recycling.

Webinar: Heartland Businesses Achieve Savings with Pollution Prevention Interns

Thu, Sep 21, 2017 1:30-2:30 PM CDT
Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1352764724773046530

Heartland businesses provide stories of the successes and savings achieved by using Pollution Prevention Interns for summer projects. These trained students bring expertise to increase efficiency, save water, energy, and materials, and save money. This webinar features several projects accomplished within the last few years by pollution prevention interns and the impact of the projects.

City Ordinances and Policies of Successful Zero Waste Communities

Read the full post from SWEEP.

As the number of communities embracing Zero Waste grows to more than two hundred within the United States, a pattern can be observed from the programs that have achieved success. As new communities consider the bold step forward toward enhancing their diversion programs and declaring Zero Waste goals, planning for the future becomes essential. Watching other communities expand their programs, and engage in the learning processes of collection, processing, marketing of hard to recycle materials, as well as deploying new public education and outreach motivation programs is important for those ready to move forward and explore the new frontiers of Zero Waste.

Tattooed avocados and shampoo bars: the businesses curbing plastics waste

Read the full story in The Guardian.

Excess or unnecessary packaging is being shunned by forward-thinking firms. Here are some examples of progress.