Category: Painting/Coating

Aerospace and Defense Consortium finds safer alternatives to hexavalent chromium

Led by Toxics Use Reduction Institute (TURI) Research Manager Greg Morose, the Aerospace and Defense Hexavalent Chromium Free Consortium is on the verge of finding safer alternatives to hexavalent chromium for conversion coatings, which is typically the base coating layer applied to bare aluminum. 

The consortium, including Boeing, Lockheed Martin, NASA and Raytheon, has been working together since 2012 and has found safer alternatives to hexavalent chromium for sealants and bond primers. If this current phase of research is successful, hexavalent chromium could be eliminated from the entire coating system.

Lockheed Martin in Texas has completed the bare aluminum corrosion, neutral salt spray and paint adhesion performance testing. NASA has started beachfront corrosion testing at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. TURI will conduct statistical analysis on the performance test results. A complete report of testing results and recommended safer alternatives is expected in the first quarter of 2021. View TURI’s website for details and published research reports. Contact Greg Morose for more information.

Assessment of Safer and Effective Alternatives for Coating Removal Products

The Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Institute did a project to identify and evaluate safer alternatives to methylene chloride and other chemicals of high concern used in coating removal products. Read the results in the final report, Assessment of Safer and Effective Alternatives for Coating Removal Products.

See also: Assessment of Safer and Effective Alternatives to Methylene Chloride for Paint Stripping Products (2017)

EPA’s New Rule on Aerosol Cans: What it Means for Who

Read the full story in Waste360.

How to manage wasted aerosol cans has long been a hot-button topic, as there are stringent rules around these potentially flammable containers as well as associated consequences—mainly high costs to comply and potential for serious violations.

But handlers will have less to worry about with the passage of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) rule around aerosol containers. That’s because it designates them as universal waste, resulting in simpler standards than when they were treated as conventional Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste.

But, more specifically, what will the new policy mean for generators, transporters and processors? And why after decades of being categorized as hazardous waste are these spent or damaged cans no longer designated as such?

EPA Bans All Retail Distribution of Methylene Chloride to Consumers for Paint and Coating Removal

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) regulations to prohibit the manufacture (including import), processing, and distribution of methylene chloride in all paint removers for consumer use will go into effect after November 22, 2019. As of that date, it will be unlawful for any person or retailer to sell or distribute paint removal products containing methylene chloride for consumer use, including e-commerce sales.

“EPA’s action keeps paint and coating removers that contain the chemical methylene chloride out of consumers’ hands,” said EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “It is against the law to sell or distribute methylene chloride for paint and coating removal in the retail marketplace—a step that will provide important public health protections for consumers.”

EPA is encouraging all consumers to stop using methylene chloride products that they may have already purchased for paint and coating removal. EPA is also reminding all retailers that sales of these products to consumers is prohibited by EPA regulations under the authority of section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). To learn more about how to comply with the regulations, including recordkeeping requirements, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/assessing-and-managing-chemicals-under-tsca/small-entity-compliance-guidance-regulation-methylene

The final regulation on methylene chloride for consumer paint and coating removal use was published on March 27, 2019, and the prohibition related to manufacturing, processing and distribution of methylene chloride for consumer paint and coating removal use is in now effect. A variety of effective, less harmful substitutes are readily available for paint removal.

EPA is continuing to work through the process outlined in TSCA to review the risks associated with other uses of methylene chloride. This process is designed to thoroughly evaluate available science before taking action to manage the risk associated with the other uses of the chemical.

Webinar: Waterborne Paint is The Future: Transition From Solvents Today

Thu, Dec 5, 2019 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM CST
Register here.

Join PPRC as collision repair shop managers and painters discuss the economics, permitting and other advantages of switching to water-borne automotive coatings.

There will be a question and answer period following the presentations or discussion, and to be respectful of everyone’s time the Q&A will be posted on the pprc.org website for later reference.

This webinar is brought to you by the PPRC, with funding through the Washington State Department of Ecology

EPA Issues Compliance Guide to Assist Small Entities with Methylene Chloride Consumer Paint and Coating Removal rule implementation

EPA has released new guidance to help methylene chloride processors and distributors comply with the March 2019 rule under section 6(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) prohibiting the manufacture (including import), processing, or distribution in commerce of methylene chloride for consumer paint and coating removal. The final rule became effective on May 28, 2019. Requirements for downstream notification and recordkeeping for all manufacturers, processors, and distributors of methylene chloride (excluding retailers) went into effect on August 27, 2019.

The guide describes the requirements EPA has established to address unreasonable risks from the use of methylene chloride in consumer paint and coating removal. The guide also

  • defines key terms,
  • identifies the regulated entities,
  • describes the required or prohibited activities, and
  • summarizes the downstream notification and recordkeeping requirements.

The small entities directly regulated by this rule include:

  • processors (since they formulate paint and coating removers containing methylene chloride),
  • distributors of methylene chloride
  • distributors of paint and coating removers containing methylene chloride, and
  • retailers.

The rule is fully effective on November 22, 2019, when prohibitions on manufacturing (including importing), processing, or distributing methylene chloride for consumer paint and coating removal go into effect. This includes a prohibition on distributing any methylene chloride for paint and coating removal to or by retailers, including e-commerce retailers. 

For more details, the full compliance guide is now available at: www.epa.gov/assessing-and-managing-chemicals-under-tsca/risk-management-methylene-chloride

Proposed rule: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Surface Coating of Metal Cans and Surface Coating of Metal Coil Residual Risk and Technology Reviews

Read the proposed rule in the Federal Register. Comments due by July 19, 2019.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing amendments to address the results of the residual risk and technology reviews (RTRs) that the EPA is required to conduct in accordance with the Clean Air Act (CAA) with regard to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for the Surface Coating of Metal Cans and the NESHAP for the Surface Coating of Metal Coil.

The EPA is proposing to find the risks due to emissions of air toxics from these source categories under the current standards to be acceptable and that the standards provide an ample margin of safety to protect public health. We are proposing no revisions to the numerical emission limits based on these analyses.

The EPA is proposing to amend provisions addressing emissions during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction (SSM); to amend provisions regarding electronic reporting of performance test results; to amend provisions regarding monitoring requirements; and to make miscellaneous clarifying and technical corrections.

GLRPPR spray paint efficiency webinar recording now available

On March 28, the Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable, the Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center, and the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center co-hosted a spray paint efficiency webinar. The webinar was funded in part by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Attendees learned about EPA’s 6H surface coating regulation and the spray efficiency techniques required. They also learned how simpler refinements in techniques can improve paint quality and maximize transfer efficiency.

The event benefits painters, supervisors, trainers, and technical assistance providers and offers the opportunity to receive a certificate of course completion for painters valid for five years from the date of issue.

Find the webinar recording and links to additional information on the GLRPPR Archive LibGuide.

Spray paint efficiency webinar video

EPA bans deadly chemical used in paint strippers — but provides exemption for commercial operators

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

The Environmental Protection Agency on Friday restricted the use of a toxic chemical used in paint and coating strippers that has been linked to dozens of accidental deaths. But the agency stopped short of the total ban proposed by the Obama administration and pushed by some health groups, instead allowing commercial operators to keep using the chemical so long as they are trained.

Webinar: Spray Efficiency Training, March 28

Thu, Mar 28, 2019 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CDT
Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8385536877325968643

This free webinar will cover EPA’s 6H surface coating regulation and the spray efficiency techniques required. Companies implementing spray efficiency have saved from thousands to tens of thousands of dollars in paint and maintenance costs on a yearly basis.

Become more familiar with 6H and learn how simple technique refinements can improve paint quality and maximize transfer efficiency. This workshop will benefit painters, supervisors, trainers and technical assistance providers and offer the opportunity to receive a certificate of course completion for painters valid for five years from the date of issue.

Co-sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center, the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center, and the Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable.

%d bloggers like this: