Keystone Pipeline Oil Spill Reported In South Dakota

Read the full story at NPR.

TransCanada, the company that owns and operates the Keystone Pipeline, says that an estimated 210,000 gallons, or 5,000 barrels, of oil have spilled near the small town of Amherst, S.D.

How a 672,000-Gallon Oil Spill Was Nearly Invisible

Read the full story in the New York Times.

Mention oil spills, and images of birds coated in black slime and a shiny slick on the ocean’s surface come to mind.

But not all oil spills are the same.

About 672,000 gallons of oil spilled when a pipeline fractured about a mile below the ocean’s surface this month in the Gulf of Mexico southeast of Venice, La., which is about 65 miles south of New Orleans.

Hardly any of it was visible.

Electricity from shale gas vs. coal: Lifetime toxic releases from coal much higher

Read the full story in ScienceDaily.

Despite widespread concern about potential human health impacts from hydraulic fracturing, the lifetime toxic chemical releases associated with coal-generated electricity are 10 to 100 times greater than those from electricity generated with natural gas obtained via fracking, according to a new study.

Why Does Green California Pump the Dirtiest Oil in the U.S.?

Read the full story at e360.

California may be a leader in climate policies, but much of its abundant oil reserves are nearly as carbon-intensive to extract and refine as Alberta tar sands crude. Many experts now say that reform of the state’s methods of producing oil is long overdue.

IDNR issues first fracking permit in Illinois

Read the full story in the Southern Illinoisan.

In a historic move, regulators from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources Department of Oil and Gas Resource Management on Thursday approved the state’s first fracking permit.

Approval of the permit, issued to Wichita, Kansas based Woolsey Operating Company, comes more than four years after former state governor Pat Quinn signed the Hydraulic Fracturing Regulatory Act into law, opening the way for the controversial oil-drilling practice to begin in the state of Illinois.

Release of treated wastewater from hydraulic fracturing contaminates lake

Read the full story in Science Daily.

Hydraulic fracturing has enabled a domestic oil and gas boom in the US, but its rapid growth has raised questions about what to do with the billions of gallons of wastewater that result. Researchers now report that treating the wastewater and releasing it into surface waters has led to the contamination of a Pennsylvania watershed with radioactive material and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.