Atop a Manhattan Convention Center, a Harvest of Honey

Read the full story in the New York Times.

Let us begin not with the who, which was several thousand bees and a bunch of people in anti-sting gear that looked like spacesuits, or the what, which was harvesting honey. Let us go directly to the where.

It was not a bosky setting that would bring to mind the Robert Frost poemabout good fences and good neighbors, but the south roof of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center on Manhattan’s Far West Side. Here the neighbors are the unfinished towers of the Hudson Yards development. They ring what has become an urban meadow — the south roof, mostly covered by 6.75 acres of kaleidoscopic sedum. It is yellowish green. It will turn red in time for Christmas.

The bees have been in residence since spring. The first 12,000 came from California, transplanted in a three-pound container that looked like a shoe box with screens on both sides. They were placed in wooden hives, which look like stackable drawers. There were 60,000 to 80,000 by midsummer.

Bees Are Bouncing Back From Colony Collapse Disorder

Read the full story from Bloomberg News.

The number of U.S. honeybees, a critical component to agricultural production, rose in 2017 from a year earlier, and deaths of the insects attributed to a mysterious malady that’s affected hives in North America and Europe declined, according a U.S. Department of Agriculture honeybee health survey released Tuesday.

How General Mills Celebrates Honey Bees

Read the full story in Triple Pundit.

Could you do your job if you were kicked out your house, had no food, and under constant attack by parasites and poisons? Not likely. But this is what life is like for many species of birds, bees and other insects who pollinate our crops and help grow one-third of the global food supply.

Minnesota citizen scientists thrill at sightings of endangered bumble bee

Read the full story in Great Lakes Echo.

Scientific discoveries don’t always come from scientists in a lab.

Amanda Sampson Townsend made one in July when she sunk her feet into a small patch of colorful, black-eyed Susan and bee balm in southeast Minnesota.

“I looked down and right on this little bee balm plant, right next to me, was this little bee,” Sampson Townsend said.

Finding a bee seems like a small discovery, but Sampson Townsend didn’t find just any bee.

Sampson Townsend found a rusty patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis), she said. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service put the species on the federally endangered list in March.

Nighttime pollination under threat from light pollution

Read the full story from Mother Nature Network.

Writing in the journal Nature, a group of scientists from Switzerland has identified light pollution as a previously unknown threat to nocturnal insects (beetles, moths and flies) vital in the pollination of crops and wild plants. To study its impact on nighttime communities, the team deployed standard LED street lights over plots of cabbage thistle in the remote meadows of the Bernese Prealps.

Old landfill to recycle materials, serve as pollinator habitat

Read the full story at Niagara This Week.

Those old shingles workers are tearing off your roof and old wooden pallets left over from shipping materials could soon find a new use, thanks to the big brains at Walker Environmental.

The company already takes all the kitchen scraps and yard waste that Niagara residents put to the curb for the region’s waste contractor and turns it into useful compost at its facility on the Niagara Falls-Thorold border. As well, it runs other renewable energy businesses.

But Walker now has approval from the province’s environment ministry to turn its old east landfill on the border of those two cities into a unique resource recovery area, diverting materials from precious landfill space.

No Offense, American Bees, But Your Sperm Isn’t Cutting It

Read the full story from NPR.

Since 2008, Cobey has done her share of bee abdomen rubbing as part of a research team from Washington State University traveling through Europe and Asia. They’ve collected sperm from native honeybees in Italy, Slovenia, Germany, Kazakhstan and the Republic of Georgia – countries where honeybees have favorable genetic traits, like resistance to the varroa mite. The deadly parasite has been cited as a major factor in bee deaths, along with genetics, poor nutrition and pesticide exposure, according to a major report from the USDA and EPA in 2013.