Don’t call it a carp: Illinois dresses up the reviled invasive species and hopes customers will bite

Read the full story from WBEZ.

A bony fish long deemed the ‘bottom of the barrel’ will appear in sandwiches and on menus under the new name “Copi.”

Mussel shells are clogging London’s water pipes, but one designer found a surprising solution

Read the full story at Fast Company.

About eight years ago, an invasive species called quagga mussel shells started clogging up London’s water pipes and tunnels. Since then, Thames Water, the utility company that’s responsible for the city’s public water supply and wastewater treatment has spent millions of pounds to remove them. Most of these shells have ended up in landfills, but in a few years, you might see them on the walls of your building–albeit in a different form.

Will renaming carp help control them?

Read the full story from the University of Illinois.

Illinois officials this month announced that Asian carp would now be called “copi” in an attempt to make the fish more desirable for eating. Joseph Parkos, the director of the Illinois Natural History Survey’s Kaskaskia, Ridge Lake and Sam Parr biological stations in Illinois, spoke with News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about scientific initiatives to study and control carp/copi fish populations and the potential for rebranding to aid those efforts.

Lake Michigan water-level rise affects inland waterways, study finds

Read the full story from the University of Illinois.

2020 marked Lake Michigan’s highest water level in 120 years, experts said, and climate variance makes future water levels challenging to predict. Coastal impacts are well-documented, but the effect of lake level rise on the area’s inland waterways is poorly understood. A University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign study examined how Lake Michigan’s rising levels affect water quality, flood control and invasive species management within the Chicago-area waterway system that connects the lake to Illinois, Indiana and the Mississippi River basin.

Invasive insect that kills grapes could reach California wine region by 2027

Read the full story from North Carolina State University.

The spotted lanternfly, an invasive insect that can kill grapevines and damage other crops, has a chance of first reaching the wine-producing counties of California in five years, according to a new analysis from North Carolina State University researchers.

Beating back invasive species helps ranchers in tallgrass prairie

Read the full story in High Plains Journal.

Understanding the ecosystem provides the script for writing a successful story against unwanted species in the tallgrass prairie, according to two conservation advocates who are also ranchers from Wilson County, Kansas.

Lake Michigan water-level rise affects inland waterways, study finds

Read the full story from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

2020 marked Lake Michigan’s highest water level in 120 years, experts said, and climate variance makes future water levels challenging to predict. Coastal impacts are well-documented, but the effect of lake level rise on the area’s inland waterways is poorly understood. A University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign study examined how Lake Michigan’s rising levels affect water quality, flood control and invasive species management within the Chicago-area waterway system that connects the lake to Illinois, Indiana and the Mississippi River basin.

The study, led by civil and environmental engineering professor Marcelo Garcia and graduate student Dongchen Wang, focused on how lake-level rise influences the unique bidirectional flow of the Chicago-area waterway system – initiated by the engineered reversal of the Chicago River in 1900 – and its connection to the Calumet-area waterway subsystem situated along the Illinois-Indiana border.

Callery Pear: ‘Bradford’ and Other Varieties and Their Invasive Progeny

Read the full story from NC State Extension.

Callery pear (Pyrus calleryana Decne.) is an Asian species of ornamental pear with several cultivars planted throughout the Southeast. Varieties include ‘Bradford’, ‘Chanticleer’/‘Cleveland Select’, ‘Autumn Blaze’, ‘Aristocrat’, and more. Ornamental plantings of Callery pear are gaining increased scrutiny in recent years as evidence and impacts of its invasiveness mount. Once prized ornamental trees, ‘Bradford’ and other varieties of P. calleryana are an increasing environmental and land management concern.

Abundance, exploitation, recovery: A portrait of South Georgia

Read the full story from the New York Times.

A series of ecological initiatives, including the eradication of several invasive species, has dramatically revived the life and landscape of this remote sub-Antarctic island.

If at first you don’t succeed, flush flush again

Ship flushing ballast tank

Read the full story at Anthropocene Magazine.

After decades of failure, the tide has finally turned in the battle against invasive species in the Great Lakes. Scientists say the main reason is mandatory saltwater flushing of ship ballast tanks.