Creation of a National Urban Wildlife Monitoring Network Helps Build Wildlife-Friendly Cities

Read the full story in National Geographic Magazine.

The entire planet is urbanizing, and every city is different. So ultimately we need data from, well, everywhere. That’s why we’ve been taking lessons we learned in Chicago through the Urban Wildlife Institute at Lincoln Park Zoo and exporting them around the country. We’re creating, for the first time, a worldwide network for urban wildlife research: the Urban Wildlife Information Network (UWIN).

The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary adaptation to toxic pollution in wild fish

Noah M. Reid, Dina A. Proestou, Bryan W. Clark, Wesley C. Warren, John K. Colbourne, Joseph R. Shaw, Sibel I. Karchner, Mark E. Hahn, Diane Nacci, Marjorie F. Oleksiak, Douglas L. Crawford, Andrew Whitehead (2016). “The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary adaptation to toxic pollution in wild fish.” Science 09 Dec 2016 : 1305-1308. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah4993

Abstract: Many organisms have evolved tolerance to natural and human-generated toxins. Reid et al. performed a genomic analysis of killifish, geographically separate and independent populations of which have adapted recently to severe pollution (see the Perspective by Tobler and Culumber). Sequencing multiple sensitive and resistant populations revealed signals of selective sweeps for variants that may confer tolerance to toxins, some of which were shared between resistant populations. Thus, high genetic diversity in killifish seems to allow selection to act on existing variation, driving rapid adaptation to selective forces such as pollution.

Stressed street trees: mapping the urban forests to save them – and us

Read the full story in The Guardian.

City trees are under increased threat but research tools show that looking after them will lower temperatures, prevent flooding and reduce pollution.

iNaturalist.org

Visit the site.

iNaturalist is an online social network of people sharing biodiversity information to help each other learn about nature

It’s also a crowdsourced species identification system and an organism occurrence recording tool. You can use it to record your own observations, get help with identifications, collaborate with others to collect this kind of information for a common purpose, or access the observational data collected by iNaturalist users.

How Global Warming Is Threatening Genetic Diversity

Read the full story at JSTOR Daily.

There is a huge unknown when it comes to protecting the meltwater stonefly and other species. Biologists are missing a huge piece of the puzzle — knowing which genetics will give species the evolutionary lift that allows them to adapt successfully to a warmer world. This hidden DNA and the possibly important traits it represents are known as “cryptic diversity,” and much of it is being lost, experts say, as the range of species contracts, fragments, and otherwise changes. Yet this DNA is vital because it contains information on different lineages and on species that are emerging, the cutting edge of evolution. Losing it will greatly complicate the task of assessing how climate change will affect biodiversity and what to protect.

The endangered listing for the rusty patched bumblebee is finally given wings

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

The rusty patched bumblebee’s path to the endangered list was as up and down as the way it flies.

After a years-long run-up to a determination early this year that it was eligible for the list, and a month-long delay for a newly required review by the Trump administration, the rusty patched on Tuesday became the first bumblebee — and the first bee overall in the continental United States — to be listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Fish and Wildlife Service Coastal Program Grants

Applications due Sep 30, 2017.

For more information: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=289863. Click the Related Documents tab to download the full RFP.

The Coastal Program is a voluntary, incentive-based program that provides direct technical assistance and financial assistance in the form of cooperative agreements to coastal communities and landowners to restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat on public and private lands. Coastal Program staff coordinate with project partners, stakeholders and other Service programs to identify geographic focus areas and develop habitat conservation priorities within these focus areas. Geographic focus areas are where the Coastal Program directs resources to conserve habitat for federal trust species. Project work plans are developed strategically, in coordination with partners, and with substantial involvement from Service field staff. Projects must advance our mission, promote biological diversity, and be based upon sound scientific biological principles. Program strategic plans inform the types of projects funded under this opportunity.

Applicants seeking funding under this program should review the program strategic plan and also contact the regional Coastal Program office prior to submitting an application for funding. Authorizing statues include Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956, 16 U.S.C. 742a-c, 747e-742j; and Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act of 1958, 16 U.S.C. 661 667(e).