A big step toward ‘green’ ammonia and a ‘greener’ fertilizer

Read the full story from the University of California – Berkeley.

Synthesizing ammonia, the key ingredient in fertilizer, is energy intensive and a significant contributor to greenhouse gas warming of the planet. Chemists designed and synthesized porous materials — metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs — that bind and release ammonia at more moderate pressures and temperatures than the standard Haber-Bosch process for making ammonia. The MOF doesn’t bind to any of the reactants, making capture and release of ammonia less energy intensive and greener.

Nestlé pilots recyclable paper in Australia

Read the full story at Environment + Energy Leader.

Nestlé, the parent company of KitKat, has announced a new pilot program to test compostable and recyclable paper packaging for their chocolate bars. The pilot is exclusive to Coles supermarkets in Australia and will provide customers with a convenient and eco-friendly way to enjoy their favorite chocolate. This initiative is part of Nestlé’s commitment to reducing plastic waste by transitioning away from single-use plastic packaging.

The pilot program will feature KitKat bars wrapped in recyclable paper packaging rather than the traditional plastic wrapper. To ensure customer feedback on the new packaging, each bar will include a QR code that customers can scan to leave their comments on the product. Local retailer Coles will have exclusive distribution rights.

Uncommon grounds: Sustainable, ‘beanless’ coffee unveiled

Read the full story at The Food Institute.

Annie Morris, editor in chief of Made in CA magazine, said that sustainable coffee, like the one being launched soon by Minus Coffee, is one way that companies can reduce their environmental footprint while still delivering a delicious product. Sustainable coffee offerings have the potential to really catch on, according to industry insiders.

McCormick is working to make its supply chain more sustainable

Read the full story at Environment + Energy Leader.

McCormick & Company is a food company that manufactures, markets, and distributes spices, seasoning mixes, condiments, and other flavoring products to retail outlets, food manufacturers, and food service businesses. The Baltimore-based company has 14,000 employees based worldwide. Its investments have tangible benefits for farmers and customers and throughout its supply chain.

It is doubling down on its commitment to climate change, environmental compliance, and raw material procurement. It aims to be net zero in 2050, and it has joined the UN”s Science-Based Targets Initiative, which wants to keep temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. At the same time, the company has made significant progress toward its sustainable packaging goals.

ESG Case Study: How corporate purpose strengthens Kellogg’s ESG communications with stakeholders

Read the full story from Thomson Reuters.

Multinational food manufacturing giant the Kellogg Company (Kellogg’s) is among those companies that consistently link their global purpose platform to their sustainability agenda and ensures their purpose is centered on the well-being of their employees and other stakeholders. More specifically, the company, through its Kellogg’s™ Better Days Promise, aims to advance sustainable and equitable access to food by addressing the intersection of well-being, hunger, sustainability, and equity, diversity & inclusion to create better days for 3 billion people by the end of 2030.

Bob’s Red Mill sustainability manager talks food waste reduction initiative

Read the full story at Oregon Business.

Between May and October in 2022, Milwaukie food producer Bob’s Red Mill participated in a case study with Pacific Coast Collaborative, the World Wildlife Fund, and sustainability consultant TripleWin Advisory, with the aim of generating employee-driven, ground-floor ideas for increasing company sustainability through a reduction in food waste.

According to the World Wildlife Fund food waste accounts for approximately 6%-8% of all human-caused greenhouse gas emissions – the carbon dioxide equivalent of 32.6 million cars.

The study, published through the World Wildlife Fund in December, found 22% of employees submitted food waste reduction ideas. For the study, Bob’s Red Mill chose to implement a conveyor belt technique which reduced oat overflow. The result was a 70% reduction in wasted food per pound of food produced on the line, according to the study.

Julia Person, sustainability manager at Bob’s Red Mill, tells Oregon Business the employee response, as well at the results of the study were better than the company could have imagined, and explained how employee-driven sustainability initiatives will be priority for the company moving forward.

Emerging technologies tackle upstream food waste

Read the full story at Food Business News.

Enhancing liquidation processes, reducing the impact of mycotoxins and extending the shelf life of products are just a handful of potential solutions for reducing food waste. ReFED also recommends farmers explore new arrangements with buyers to expand product specifications and enable better upstream communication. Building direct relationships with food recovery organizations and employing tools that track yield patterns also are avenues for mitigating waste at the farm level.

Opportunities exist for manufacturers to create more upcycled product lines using edible byproducts. ReFED also encourages manufacturers to consider reengineering processes and redesigning products to reduce waste during production and product line changeovers.

New federal food donation law seen as welcome and overdue

Read the full story at Waste360.

Food manufacturers, retailers, restaurants, farmers, and schools now have reason to let go of a fear many of them have long harbored: a fear of litigation if they donate their surplus food. The Food Donation Improvement Act (FDIA), signed into law December 2022, amends the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, which was intended to encourage food donation, but had some glitches. A big one was ambiguous language explaining the rules around donation.

The FDIA clarifies and expands liability protections outlined in Emerson; perhaps the most monumental reform is that it lays a more direct path for qualified entities to give away good food they would otherwise throw out. Now they can donate directly to people in need in their communities when prior they had to arrange to get it to nonprofits that distribute it.

FDIA had full bipartisan support, passing unanimously and as a standalone bill, a little over a year after its introduction.

FDA issues guidance to reduce lead exposure in baby food

Read the full story at The Hill.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released new guidelines for the amount of lead that can be in processed food for babies and small children under the age of 2, a move the agency says would result in significant reductions in the exposure to the toxic metal.

The new guidance includes a limit of 10 parts per billion of lead in fruits, some vegetables and yogurts and 20 parts per billion in root vegetables and dry cereals. FDA Commissioner Robert Califf said the new standards could result in a 24 percent to 27 percent reduction in exposure to lead from the foods.

Food solutions for a sustainable tomorrow

Read the full story at New Food Magazine.

With multiple forces acting against global food security, researchers in Singapore have been innovating. Read their solutions that help combat food waste and obesity, while improving health and sustainable food production.