Del Monte Foods doubles down on upcycled foods by reusing pineapple juice

Read the full story at Food Dive.

UPDATE: April 20, 2022: Del Monte Foods said its Del Monte Gut Love and Boost Me Fruit Infusions have been declared Upcycled Certified by the Upcycled Food Association, the latest of the company’s offerings to receive the designation.

The canned fruit and vegetable company estimated the products will redirect about 130,000 pounds of pineapple juice each year, helping to provide nutritious and affordable food while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The liquid comes from pineapple used in Gut Love, Boost Me and other products.

Del Monte Foods has announced what it said is the industry’s first canned vegetable product to be certified by the Upcycled Food Association under its new upcycled certification program.

The company’s Blue Lake Petite Cut and Blue Lake Farmhouse Cut Green Beans are made with 100% upcycled and sustainably grown green beans from Wisconsin and Illinois. Both products have been on the market for years. Del Monte said it is looking into reflecting the new certification on future cans.

Del Monte is among countless other companies in the CPG space looking to curtail product waste and find new ways to use foods that would otherwise be thrown out as the issue becomes more important to shoppers.

License to Greenwash: How Certification Schemes and Voluntary Initiatives Are Fueling Fossil Fashion

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The fashion sector is awash with certification schemes, sustainability labels and multi-stakeholder initiatives all seeking to steer the industry onto a greener course. As public and political awareness of the high environmental and social toll of the fashion industry has climbed the agenda, and scrutiny on brands has intensified, so has the visibility of certification schemes and voluntary initiatives pitched as holding the solutions.

The existence of such schemes serves a dual purpose for the brands. As the fashion industry is one of the least regulated sectors in the world, these schemes partially exist as a genuine attempt to move towards sustainability in the absence of environmental legislation. But they also enable the proliferation of ‘greenwashing’ on a remarkable scale. Whether it is the use of certification labels on individual products – assuring customers that they can shop guilt free by putting their money where their values lie – or brands proudly communicating their membership of various fashion-related voluntary initiatives, the existence of these schemes and the inherent lack of accountability within them are a key part of the greenwashing machinery of the modern fashion industry. Moreover, the level of influence exercised by fashion brands in these initiatives and the lack of any independent oversight, inevitably means that they end up promoting industry interests.

Plastic labelling needs ‘sustainability scale’

Read the full story from the University of Exeter.

Labelling of plastic products needs a drastic overhaul including a new ‘sustainability scale’ to help consumers, researchers say.

EPA updates resources to help federal purchasers meet the Biden administration’s sustainability goals

Read the full story at National Law Review.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on February 4, 2022, the release of a “new and improved” Framework for the Assessment of Environmental Performance Standards and Ecolabels for Federal Purchasing under its Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) program, as well as a webpage highlighting ecolabel criteria that address per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). EPA states that “[t]hese actions are a key step in implementing President Biden’s Executive Order on Catalyzing Clean Energy Industries and Jobs through Federal Sustainability and the accompanying Federal Sustainability Plan.

Food labeling failing to drive sustainable consumer behavior, finds Wageningen review

Read the full story at Packaging Insights.

Sustainability labels and classifications on F&B packaging could have a greater impact by combining labels and labeling systems, linking to other drivers of behavior and emphasizing other benefits such as health. These conclusions come as part of a recent literature review by Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands. 

Eco-Products earns GreenScreen certification for plant-based packaging with no PFAS added

Read the company news release.

Eco-Products® announced today that it has earned the coveted GreenScreen Certified™ Silver designation for its groundbreaking line of compostable plates and containers made from sugarcane.

Called Vanguard™, the award-winning line uses a proprietary chemistry to achieve grease resistance without the use of PFAS, a class of materials sometimes referred to as “forever chemicals.” In addition, GreenScreen Certified products do not contain other chemicals of high concern or known regrettable substitutes.

Will eco labelling truly help the food sector win consumer trust?

Read the full story from Food Navigator.

Labels displaying a product’s environmental impact could be an important piece of the puzzle as the industry attempts to cut its environmental impact.

Industry’s first carbon label: Foodsteps helps restaurants and food businesses quantify CO2 impact

Read the full story at Food Ingredients First.

Foodsteps, a food-tech start-up established by Cambridge University scientists and alumni, has formally launched in the UK. It’s the first British tech firm to provide carbon tracking and impact labeling to restaurants, caterers and food businesses. This initiative helps companies calculate, reduce and label the environmental impact of their food.

Carbon labels for food businesses and restaurants launched in ‘world first’

Read the full story in Food Navigator.

A company claims it is the first to make eco-labels widely available to all food businesses.

“Carbon score is the next big thing,” predicts CGC co-head, industry experts gathered by FoodBytes!

Read the full story at Food Navigator.

Carbon labeling for food and beverage may be coming faster than originally predicted, and soon may hold more sway with consumers than other popular certifications as the ongoing pandemic accelerates consumer interest in sustainable diets, predict industry stakeholders gathered by FoodBytes! during a recent roundtable discussion about transparency in the supply chain.