Accelerating reuse models to achieve a world free of plastic waste

Read the full story from the World Economic Forum.

The World Economic Forum’s Consumers Beyond Waste initiative is driving a shift towards reuse models through the standardization of measurement and is elevating reuse as a critical aspect of the UN agreement on plastic pollution.

Half of global plastic production is for single-use and only 14% of plastic packaging is collected for recycling; reliance on recycling alone will not solve the waste problem.

The production of plastic also increases carbon emissions since it is a by-product of petroleum and it impacts health, with microplastics recently found in human blood.

Nestlé pilots recyclable paper in Australia

Read the full story at Environment + Energy Leader.

Nestlé, the parent company of KitKat, has announced a new pilot program to test compostable and recyclable paper packaging for their chocolate bars. The pilot is exclusive to Coles supermarkets in Australia and will provide customers with a convenient and eco-friendly way to enjoy their favorite chocolate. This initiative is part of Nestlé’s commitment to reducing plastic waste by transitioning away from single-use plastic packaging.

The pilot program will feature KitKat bars wrapped in recyclable paper packaging rather than the traditional plastic wrapper. To ensure customer feedback on the new packaging, each bar will include a QR code that customers can scan to leave their comments on the product. Local retailer Coles will have exclusive distribution rights.

Loop touts retail store expansion as standalone e-commerce program sunsets

Read the full story at Waste Dive.

Loop, TerraCycle’s reusable packaging program, ended 2022 with about 150 active retail locations worldwide. This includes about three dozen U.S. locations, with grocery pilots at Fred Meyer in Oregon and Giant Food in Washington, D.C., and home delivery for Walmart customers in Arkansas.

Loop launched in 2019 as a standalone e-commerce platform to manage reusable container distribution and collection, but that concept largely is being phased out as the retail program gains traction. Going forward, Loop’s e-commerce presence will be integrated with partners, such as Walmart’s home delivery website, according to the company.

Loop plans for further growth in 2023, with announced expansions coming in France and Japan. It will also work with U.S. retail partners to build the reuse ecosystem and increase product distribution, although concrete plans haven’t yet been made public, according to Clem Schmid, general manager at Loop Global.

USask-developed bio-glitter ‘green’ alternative to persistent plastics

Read the full story from the University of Saskatchewan.

In everything from shiny gift wrapping to kids’ dance costumes to makeup for adults heading to parties, glitter is everywhere this time of year. But custodians and environmentalists hate the stuff, because it’s almost impossible to clean up, both indoors and especially outdoors.

Now, a University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has developed an innovative glitter product that is biodegradable and uses light-reflecting shapes to create sparkles unlike any other – with the potential to mitigate plastic pollution around the world.

Product environmental footprinting: Will the EU pave the way?

Read the full story at Food Navigator.

As the environmental impact of food becomes an important indicator for consumers all around the world, private and public initiatives have multiplied. These initiatives use several methodologies to calculate the environmental impact of a product, which means that one product can have different results depending on the method used.

In the European Union, the Commission has decided to address this fragmentation by announcing the publication of a proposal for a regulation on the substantiation of claims relating to the environmental performance of products and businesses.

EPA adds nine chemicals and removes one PFAS from the Safer Chemical Ingredients List

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is updating the Safer Chemical Ingredients List (SCIL), a living list of chemicals organized by functional-use class that EPA’s Safer Choice program has evaluated and determined meet Safer Choice criteria. This update is part of an effort to expand and maintain the SCIL. With this update, there are a total of 1,064 chemicals listed on the SCIL.

In this update, EPA is adding nine chemicals to the SCIL. To expand the number of chemicals and functional-use categories on the SCIL, EPA encourages manufacturers to submit their safer chemicals to EPA for review and listing on the SCIL. In support of the Biden-Harris Administration’s goals, the addition of chemicals to the SCIL incentivizes further innovation in safer chemistry, which can promote environmental justice, bolster resilience to the impacts of climate change, and improve water quality. Chemicals on the SCIL are among the safest for their functional use.

EPA is also changing the status for one chemical (CASRN 27619-97-2, 1-Octanesulfonic acid, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-tridecafluoro-) that has recently been identified on the SCIL as a per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS). 1-Octanesulfonic acid, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-tridecafluoro- is not used in any Safer Choice-certified products. The chemical was added to the SCIL in 2012 based on the data available and the state of the Agency’s knowledge at the time. EPA has now updated the SCIL listing for this chemical to a grey square because of a growing understanding of the toxicological profiles for certain PFAS and incomplete information on the potential health and environmental effects of these substances.

EPA’s process for removing a chemical from the SCIL is to first mark the chemical with a grey square on the SCIL webpage to provide notice to chemical and product manufacturers that this chemical may no longer be acceptable for use in Safer Choice-certified products. A grey square notation on the SCIL means that the chemical may not be allowed for use in products that are candidates for the Safer Choice label, and any current Safer Choice-certified products that contain this chemical must be reformulated unless relevant health and safety data is provided to justify continuing to list this chemical on the SCIL. The data required would be determined on a case-by-case basis. In general, data useful for making such a determination would provide evidence of low concern for human health and environmental impacts. Unless information provided to EPA adequately justifies continued listing, the chemical would then be removed from the SCIL 12 months after the grey square designation.

The SCIL is a resource that can help many different stakeholders.

  • Product manufacturers use the SCIL to help make high-functioning products that contain safer ingredients. 
  • Chemical manufacturers use this list to promote the safer chemicals they manufacture.
  • Retailers use the list to help shape their sustainability programs.
  • Environmental and health advocates use the list to support their work with industry to encourage the use of the safest possible chemistry.

EPA’s Safer Choice program certifies products containing ingredients that have met the program’s rigorous human health and environmental safety criteria. The Safer Choice program allows companies to use its label on products that meet the Safer Choice Standard. The EPA website contains a complete list of Safer Choice-certified products.

Learn more

In pursuit of clean packaging with no chemicals of concern

Read the full story in Food Safety Magazine.

The food industry is just beginning to address PFAS derivatives as EPA has done, but it is making slow progress.

The industry gets serious about sustainability

Read the full story at Packaging Strategies.

More CPG companies than ever before are done talking about sustainability and are ready for action.

PepsiCo to double use of reusable packaging to 20% by 2030

Read the full story at Food Dive.

PepsiCo plans to double the percentage of all beverage servings it sells delivered through reusable models from a current 10% to 20% by 2030, the company said in a statement.

PepsiCo said it will focus on four areas to meet its goal: expand the company’s SodaStream business, build out refillable plastic (PET) and glass bottle offerings, grow its fountain drinks platform with reusable cups; and accelerate growth in powders and concentrates.

As consumers place a greater importance on the role food and beverage companies play in the environment, nearly every large CPG has announced some type of commitment to reducing their footprint.

PepsiCo to increase reusable beverage packaging

Read the full story at Food Navigator.

PepsiCo wants to see 20% of its beverages served via reusable models by 2030: highlighting the four approaches it will focus on to achieve this goal.