Natural drainage: More bioswales coming to Waukegan lakefront

Read the full story in the Lake County News-Sun.

Waukegan’s Sustainable Shoreline Plan received a $375,000 boost from a federal grant that will be used to construct bioswales — drainage systems aimed at using nature as a natural filter for rainwater runoff — along the Waukegan Municipal Beach parking lot and Sea Horse Drive.

Architects Speak Out Against Trump’s Latest Executive Order

Read the full story in FastCompany.

One issue that the right and left agreed upon in the 2016 election? Infrastructure. The country’s roads, bridges, highways, hospitals, railways, and water systems need immediate attention. President Trump promised to spend $1 trillion to improve the situation; so far, no comprehensive plan has been released–but the president is implementing policy that will impact how these projects are designed and built. And according to environmentalists and architects, it might make infrastructure weaker, not stronger.

Leaving the Gray Behind

Read the full story from U.S. EPA.

Researchers with EPA’s Net Zero Program are working with the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas Unified School District 475, and other partners to demonstrate and assess green infrastructure technologies and performance at Fort Riley, an Army base in Kansas.

How Houston Can Become More Resilient To Future Floods

Read the full story in Fast Company.

All coastal cities need to understand that water is going to be coming more frequently than ever, and design systems that absorb and store flood waters safely.

Architects Speak Out Against Trump’s Latest Executive Order

Read the full story in Fast Company.

One issue that the right and left agreed upon in the 2016 election? Infrastructure. The country’s roads, bridges, highways, hospitals, railways, and water systems need immediate attention. President Trump promised to spend $1 trillion to improve the situation; so far, no comprehensive plan has been released–but the president is implementing policy that will impact how these projects are designed and built. And according to environmentalists and architects, it might make infrastructure weaker, not stronger.

Webinar: Exploring the Link Between Green Infrastructure and Air Quality

Wed, Aug 9, 2017 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM CDT
Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6073101179717540355

In this webcast, speakers will discuss innovative research into the multiple benefits of green infrastructure, specifically projects involving vegetative plantings near roads and green roofs to improve air quality.

While green infrastructure can help communities manage stormwater, using vegetated systems like green roofs and tree boxes can also help improve air quality and reduce urban heat island effects. These practices shade building surfaces, deflect radiation from the sun, and release moisture into the atmosphere.  Additionally, natural features such as urban forests and vegetative barriers planted near roads, in parking lots and around city centers, assist in reducing particulate pollution and ground-level ozone, improving air quality and reducing cases of respiratory illness and other health impacts related to air pollution.

Details

Session 1: Recommendations for Constructing Roadside Vegetation Barriers to Improve Near-Road Air Quality
Richard Baldauf, Senior Engineer, U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development

Richard will present EPA’s Office of Research and Development report published in August 2016, Recommendations for Constructing Roadside Vegetation Barriers to Improve Near-Road Air Quality, about how roadside vegetation affects local air quality. The report was developed to support projects planting roadside vegetation with recommendations that can be used by states, communities and individuals interested in reducing roadside pollution.

Session 2: Estimating the Environmental Effects of Green Roofs: A Case Study in Kansas City
Robyn DeYoung, Environmental Specialist, U.S. EPA, Office of Air and Radiation

Robyn will present a case study demonstrating the environmental benefits of green roofs in Kansas City, Missouri (KCMO). She will describe how any local jurisdiction can use free and easily accessible tools to quantify the benefits of green roofs for stormwater management, air pollution, energy savings and public health. The presentation will highlight a replicable methodology using EPA’s AVERT tool and the Green Roof Energy Calculator  as well as results from Kansas City’s case study.

Speakers

Richard Baldauf, PhD, PE, a Senior Research Engineer who investigates the impacts of transportation sources on air quality, works for EPA’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, NC, as well as the Office of Transportation and Air Quality in the Office of Air and Radiation. He holds a Master’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a PhD from University of Kansas, both in Environmental Engineering. He earned a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from Virginia Tech. Richard has published more than 75 peer-reviewed journal articles during his 15 years at EPA.

Robyn DeYoung, an Environmental Specialist for the Office of Air and Radiation at US EPA Headquarters in Washington, DC, collaborates with and provides tools and resources for state and local governments to help them make the case for sustainability initiatives, such as green infrastructure, energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. She trains others on using EPA’s tool AVERT as well as other environmental monitoring tools. Robyn has a BA in Environmental Science and MA in Energy and Environmental Analysis from Boston University.

Greener City Streets Aren’t Just About Traffic. They’re About Rainwater, Too.

Read the full story in Governing.

As cities push to become more environmentally friendly, transportation planners are being asked to consider how both traffic and water flows through their streets.