Greener City Streets Aren’t Just About Traffic. They’re About Rainwater, Too.

Read the full story in Governing.

As cities push to become more environmentally friendly, transportation planners are being asked to consider how both traffic and water flows through their streets.

Putting Green Infrastructure on Private Property in New York City

Download the document.

This paper proceeds in four sections. The first provides an overview of the problems confronting New York City as a result of existing stormwater management infrastructure and regulation, and also summarizes the City’s current green infrastructure (GI) goals. The second section summarizes the benefits and costs that are expected to accompany GI in the New York City context. The third describes the City’s goals for creating GI on public and private property, as well as the timeframes currently envisioned for the task. It also notes the particular importance — and difficulty — of scaling up GI installations on private property. Finally, the fourth section examines the knotty administrative and legal issues involved in using public money to increase the volume of GI on private property.

A Green Infrastructure Guidebook for City Planners

Read the full story in CityLab.

Ninety-six percent of the country’s population lives in counties where federally declared weather-related disasters have occurred since 2010. Federal programs help mitigate these scenarios: EPA programs study climate change and issue guidelines about combating global warming; FEMA provides disaster assistance to mitigate these effects. But under Trump’s budget plan, these programs stand to lose their funding.

Ninety-six percent of the country’s population lives in counties where federally declared weather-related disasters have occurred since 2010. Federal programs help mitigate these scenarios: EPA programs study climate change and issue guidelines about combating global warming; FEMA provides disaster assistance to mitigate these effects. But under Trump’s budget plan, these programs stand to lose their funding.

Webinar: EPA STAR Grants: Moving Green Infrastructure Forward

Tue, Mar 14, 2017 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM CDT
Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3953613296781500163

EPA’s Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grant program funds research grants in numerous environmental programs, including stormwater management. This webcast will feature the work of two STAR grantees who are working to achieve new insights and promote continued green infrastructure implementation and innovation in communities across the country. Don Katnik and Amanda Shearin with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife will illustrate how urban planners can use geospatial information systems (GIS) to map regional development for the purpose of preserving and enhancing green infrastructure. Robert Traver with Villanova University will focus on the performance monitoring of urban green infrastructure practices in Philadelphia.

Want Green Infrastructure? First, Invest in Infrastructure

Read the full story in Pacific Standard.

Throughout the election, one of the few points Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton could agree on was the country’s need for improved infrastructure—transportation systems, energy, and so on. But tradeoffs between sustainability and economic growth make it unclear how exactly to proceed. Now, researchers argue that, to create environmentally sustainable infrastructure, we need to pay attention to what’s keeping us from investing in infrastructure more broadly.

Webinar: Greening Vacant Lots

Greening Vacant Lots
February 9, 2016, 1:00pm – 2:30pm EST
Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1502243317604092417.

In this webcast, speakers from the Cleveland Botanical Garden, the Buffalo Sewer Authority, and the City of Baltimore will highlight vacant lot greening programs and specific landscape treatments that they have used in their communities. These programs and practices utilize vacant lots as sponges to hold and soak in rainwater, which helps to keep local waterways clean. Implementing green infrastructure on vacant lots can also reduce the incidence of combined sewer overflows and the quantity of stormwater that municipal sewer districts treat and manage. By creatively using vacant lots as an asset, these cities are addressing legacy environmental challenges in new ways that create multiple community co-benefits.

Green Infrastructure Wizard (GIWiz)

GIWiz, EPA’s new green infrastructure information tool, offers you access to a repository of EPA-sourced Green Infrastructure tools and resources designed to support and promote sustainable water management and community planning decisions. The tools and resources available through GIWiz will help you analyze problems, understand management options, calculate design parameters, analyze costs and benefits, evaluate tradeoffs, engage stakeholders, and/or develop education and outreach campaigns.

Click on Quick Links to select Learn, Research, Design, or Assess options. When you select an option, the tool will ask you questions to help narrow your focus.

Click on Explore to browse resources. Again, the tool asks you who you are, what you’d like to do, what resources you’re interested in, etc. It also gives you a keyword search option.