Category: Green infrastructure

10 Years of Innovative Stormwater Solutions: The Campus RainWorks Challenge Brings the Next Generation of Environmentalists to the Table

Read the full story from U.S. EPA.

In 2012, EPA’s Office of Water began the Campus RainWorks Challenge, a green infrastructure design competition open to undergraduate and graduate students at colleges and universities in the United States and its territories. The challenge requires multidisciplinary student teams specializing in engineering, landscape architecture, life sciences, and other disciplines to identify a stormwater management problem on campus or at a local elementary or high school. Student teams work with a faculty advisor to help design green infrastructure solutions. Students can compete in either of the challenge’s two competition categories, demonstration projects or master plan. Demonstration projects focus on site specific applications for green infrastructure. Master plan entries apply green infrastructure across a broader area of campus.

Since the inception of this challenge, more than 700 teams from 272 academic institutions across 48 states and Puerto Rico have participated. The challenge helps EPA engage the next generation of environmental professionals and showcases the environmental, economic, and social benefits of green infrastructure practices.

5 ways the infrastructure bill would improve America’s flood resilience

Read the full story from Pew.

The $1 trillion-dollar infrastructure bill passed Aug. 10 by the Senate contains disaster and flood-resilience provisions of historic proportions. The once-in-a-generation investment would include billions of dollars in resilience measures that would help protect communities from flooding and other disasters at a time when people across the country, and around the world, are struggling to combat the increasing severity of deadly storms and rising seas. The bill’s emphasis on getting communities flood-ready shows that, to Congress and the White House, resilience is no longer an afterthought but a national priority. Here are five key ways the bill would help lower the risks and costs of flooding and other disasters across the U.S.:

Webinar: Nature-based pollution prevention – Tactics for implementation, reporting, and partnerships

Sep 15, 2021 noon-1 pm CDT
Register here.

From strategic tree plantings to wetland restoration projects, nature-based solutions (NbS) are quickly becoming a key part of many pollution prevention strategies. These solutions are accessible, scalable and offer many co-benefits, like increased biodiversity and climate resilience. In this webinar, experts and advocates from a federal agency, the private sector and a nonprofit will explore how NbS can advance pollution prevention goals on corporate lands while enhancing ecosystem services and contributing to local, regional and large-scale restoration efforts. The panelists will explain how their respective organizations approach pollution prevention, provide insights on implementation and share success stories from their work.

What you’ll learn

  • Best practices for nature-based pollution prevention
  • How pollution prevention tactics can translate into key metrics
  • The benefits of forming inter-sector partnerships for pollution prevention initiatives

Who should take this webinar

  • Corporate teams looking to implement site-based pollution prevention work
  • Representatives from nonprofits and government agencies who want to learn how corporations are utilizing NbS for pollution prevention

This porous pavement helps prevent flooding by absorbing rain

Read the full story in Fast Company.

When cities are covered in pavement, they more easily flood because stormwater can’t get into the ground. This alternative has tiny little holes to let rainwater through, while keeping pollution out.

This porous pavement helps prevent flooding by absorbing rain

Read the full story in Fast Company.

When cities are covered in pavement, they more easily flood because stormwater can’t get into the ground. This alternative has tiny little holes to let rainwater through, while keeping pollution out.

Sylvan Lake Dam overdue for updates; officials offer ‘nature-based solutions’ to combat increased rainfall, climate change effects

Read the full story in the Chicago Tribune.

It’s named Lake County for a reason.

The suburban Illinois county has more square miles of water than land, with more than 170 lakes and rivers, 400 miles of streams and thousands of acres of wetland, according to the latest U.S. census data.

But modern infrastructure problems and climate change threaten the waterways, sparking efforts — like the intergovernmental Sylvan Lake Dam Modification Project, which passed in the U.S. House of Representatives last week — that aim to restore the health of the ecosystem.

The $1.3 million proposal would renovate the more than 100-year-old dam in Mundelein to meet current safety standards, according to the office of Rep. Lauren Underwood, who represents the 14th District including Lake County.

Indiana to test highways that can charge moving EVs

Read the full story at Auto Blog.

Magnetized concrete slabs can charge electric cars driving overhead.

Billions more needed to address climate infrastructure needs of US cities: report

Read the full story at Utility Dive.

new report from the nonprofit CDP identified more than 300 sustainable infrastructure projects across 97 U.S. cities, with a collective funding and financing gap of at least $10.6 billion. 

The report, based on 2020 data from the CDP-ICLEI Unified Reporting System, found a total of $25.6 billion in sustainable infrastructure funding, ranging from climate adaptation and clean transportation to energy efficiency and water system upgrades. The true national scope of the infrastructure needs across the country is likely much larger, said Katie Walsh, CDP North America head of cities, states and regions.  

Walsh said the findings should demonstrate to federal policymakers and investors the scale of infrastructure funding needs in cities. “We want to show how these projects can make an impact on emissions … but also in growing local economies, creating jobs and racial and social equity,” Walsh said. 

Billions more needed to address climate infrastructure needs of US cities: report

Read the full story from Smart Cities Dive.

new report from the nonprofit CDP identified more than 300 sustainable infrastructure projects across 97 U.S. cities, with a collective funding and financing gap of at least $10.6 billion. 

The report, based on 2020 data from the CDP-ICLEI Unified Reporting System, found a total of $25.6 billion in sustainable infrastructure funding, ranging from climate adaptation and clean transportation to energy efficiency and water system upgrades. The true national scope of the infrastructure needs across the country is likely much larger, said Katie Walsh, CDP North America head of cities, states and regions.  

Walsh said the findings should demonstrate to federal policymakers and investors the scale of infrastructure funding needs in cities. “We want to show how these projects can make an impact on emissions … but also in growing local economies, creating jobs and racial and social equity,” Walsh said.

Throwing nitrogen out with the stormwater: UConn Extension educator, team helps coastal communities reduce runoff pollution

Read the full story from the University of Connecticut.

A team of UConn researchers is training students and providing coastal municipalities in Connecticut with green infrastructure plans to reduce stormwater runoff.

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