Over Half a Trillion Soybeans Later, Ford Marks 10-Year Anniversary of Bio-based Foam

Read the full story in Triple Pundit.

It has been 10 years since Ford Motor Company rolled out the 2008 Mustang with seats comprised of soy-based foam. Since then, the automaker says it has installed this bio-based form in at least 18.5 million cars that have rolled off the company’s assembly lines.

Wheat straw waste could be basis for greener chemicals

Read the full story at Horizon.

The straw leftover from harvested wheat could be turned into bio-based chemicals that offer high greenhouse gas savings and do not compete with food supplies or damage ecosystems.

Instead Of Throwing Out This Plastic Wrapper, You Eat It

Read the full story in Fast Company.

If you buy a Belgian waffle at a food festival this weekend in Ubud, Bali, you’ll be able to eat the wrapper it comes in. A waffle vendor is one of the early customers testing new food packaging made from seaweed instead of plastic: The wrapper is nutritious if it’s eaten, and if it ends up as litter, it naturally biodegrades.

Webinar: Chemical Footprint Project (CFP)- Empowering Companies and Investors

October 11, 2017, 3 pm CDT
Register at http://www.chemicalfootprint.org/news/event/webinar-empowering-companies-investors

Join CPA, Trillium Asset Management, and Walmart to hear how CFP evaluates businesses holistically on their journey to safer chemicals, thereby enabling participating companies to benchmark their progress, and empower investors and purchasers to evaluate and hold companies accountable.

Non-toxic flame retardant enters market, study suggests

Read the full story from Empa.

Chemists have developed and patented an environmentally friendly way to produce flame retardants for foams that can be used in mattresses and upholstery. Unlike previous flame retardants made of chemicals containing chlorine, the new material is non-toxic and effective, researchers say.

Valspar: How we engaged stakeholders to solve the BPA dilemma

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Bisphenol A (BPA)-based epoxy coatings are the most commonly used protective lining for metal food and beverage packaging. BPA-free campaigns from organizations such as the Breast Cancer Protection Partners, Clean Production Action and the Natural Resources Defense Council have raised awareness of and consumer demand for BPA-free products.

Consumer-facing food processors, can manufacturers and others who have relied on epoxy-lined cans for decades need to respond, but face the challenge of finding safe substitutes for BPA-based coatings that provide all the same functional benefits at reasonable cost.

Responding to this market opportunity, our company, Valspar, a major provider of linings to can manufacturers, undertook a novel approach to finding a safe, functional alternative that provides a promising model for how other companies might approach such challenges and opportunities.

GreenMantra Technologies, Sun Chemical Partner to Develop Polymers from Polystyrene Waste

Read the full story at Waste360.

GreenMantra Technologies, a clean technology company that produces polymer products from waste plastics, and Sun Chemical, a producer of printing inks, have agreed to partner to jointly develop polymers from recycled polystyrene waste for use in ink formulations.