Presentations from the Toxic Use Reduction Institute’s Fall 2017 Continuing Education Meeting now available

The Massachusetts Toxic Use Reduction Institute recently hosted an continuing education meeting. The presentations from that event are now available on their web site. They include: Strategies for Life Cycle Thinking and Product Sustainability at GE Plenary Speaker: Bill Flanagan, Aspire Sustainability Partners Update - November 16, 2017 Session A Materials Accounting Refresher Jeff Bibeau, Tighe & Bond …

The inevitability of chemical substitutions

Download the document (free registration required). It’s only logical that any time hazardous chemicals can be replaced by those potentially less dangerous that they should be. However, because of increasingly stringent regulations, chemical substitutions are not only practical, but inevitable. Even so, many facilities struggle to implement these concepts, despite how essential they are. In …

Tapping sewage as a source of useful materials

Read the full story in Chemical & Engineering News. Sewage treatment plants are chemical factories in waiting. By combining engineering expertise with chemistry and biology, plant operators can convert the solid sludge they generate into an array of useful chemical products. Some wastewater treatment plants already make phosphate and cellulose. But this is no cake walk. …

Turning emissions into fuel

Read the full story from MIT. MIT researchers have developed a new system that could potentially be used for converting power plant emissions of carbon dioxide into useful fuels for cars, trucks, and planes, as well as into chemical feedstocks for a wide variety of products. The new membrane-based system was developed by MIT postdoc …

Pulling iron out of waste printer toner

Read the full story from the American Chemical Society. Someday, left-over toner in discarded printer cartridges could have a second life as bridge or building components instead of as trash, wasting away in landfills and potentially harming the environment. One group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they have devised a method to recycle the …

Are petite poplars the future of biofuels? UW studies say yes

Read the full story from the University of Washington. In the quest to produce affordable biofuels, poplar trees are one of the Pacific Northwest’s best bets — the trees are abundant, fast-growing, adaptable to many terrains and their wood can be transformed into substances used in biofuel and high-value chemicals that we rely on in …