The Myth That ‘Business’ Hated Obama’s Clean Power Plan

Read the full story in The Atlantic.

But the Clean Power Plan, which which would have required states to meet certain individualized targets to limit emissions from existing power plants, was also supported by a wide array of businesses. Many big companies that have publicly pledged to reduce their environmental footprint would have been happy to see a shift toward more renewable energy, and even stood to benefit from it if it brought their energy costs down. The divide highlights something that is becoming increasingly obvious as the Trump administration rolls back various Obama-era policies: The business world isn’t a monolith, and some benefit from regulations that others detest.

What does it look like to embed sustainability across an organization?

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

A recent GreenBiz article by Joel Makower described how Cargill is preparing all of its employees to understand the concept of sustainability. The giant food and agricultural chemical company is also one of the largest private companies in the United States.

One of its managers who was very knowledgeable in sustainability felt it was time to build the profile of sustainability within the organization. The company organized a summit and invited employees from a variety of roles — supply chain, procurement, plant managers, finance, IT, sales, marketing, communications, legal, R&D, corporate affairs and government relations.

The invitation made it clear that attendees wouldn’t just be passive listeners but active participants. One goal of the event was to “create champions” throughout the company on sustainability. The summit was so successful that it was even expanded to its supply chain.

If a company is committed to integrating sustainability into its operations, it cannot do so effectively just by assigning the responsibility to a chief sustainability officer or comparable position. As Cargill got employees from all of its departments to understand and thus implement sustainability in the various departments, all companies should follow this pattern.

Tetra Pak makes strides toward sustainability goals

Read the full story at Food Dive.

Delivering on its brand promise — Protect What’s Good — Tetra Pak is expanding carton recycling, creating bio-based caps for its products and increasing consumer-related initiatives regarding sustainability issues, according to the company’s just-released 2017 Sustainability Report.

SC Johnson’s Buy of Method and Ecover Latest in Becoming Sustainable by Acquisition

Read the full story at Triple Pundit.

Earlier this month, SC Johnson announced its acquisition of Ecover and Method, two brands that proved sustainable cleaning products could be hip, competitively-priced and effective.

Wal-Mart Steps Up Push to Shed Potentially Harmful Chemicals

Read the full story from Bloomberg News.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is expanding its program to clean up the products it sells, setting a 2022 target for reducing potentially harmful substances and widening the list of chemicals it wants to avoid.

Growing Trees and Growing Profit: Is Your Business a “Restoration Enterprise?”

Read the full story from the World Resources Institute.

As one of our most powerful natural climate solutions, forest and landscape restoration is among the cheapest and most effective ways to store carbon and curb climate change. What’s more, expanding restoration can create enticing investment opportunities in a “restoration economy.”

Valspar: How we engaged stakeholders to solve the BPA dilemma

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Bisphenol A (BPA)-based epoxy coatings are the most commonly used protective lining for metal food and beverage packaging. BPA-free campaigns from organizations such as the Breast Cancer Protection Partners, Clean Production Action and the Natural Resources Defense Council have raised awareness of and consumer demand for BPA-free products.

Consumer-facing food processors, can manufacturers and others who have relied on epoxy-lined cans for decades need to respond, but face the challenge of finding safe substitutes for BPA-based coatings that provide all the same functional benefits at reasonable cost.

Responding to this market opportunity, our company, Valspar, a major provider of linings to can manufacturers, undertook a novel approach to finding a safe, functional alternative that provides a promising model for how other companies might approach such challenges and opportunities.