Corporate Procurement Officers Say Sustainability Now Key Criteria For Purchases

Read the full story at Ecosystem Marketplace.

More and more companies are incorporating sustainability criteria into their procurement activities, according to new research released February 7.

The 2017 Sustainable Procurement Barometer, published jointly by Paris-based sustainability consultancy EcoVadis, and the Hautes études commerciales de Paris (HEC Paris) business school, is the first Barometer report since 2013, and it shows a sharp increase in sustainability awareness. The findings echo those of the Forest Trends Supply Change project, which shows steadily increasing corporate action to halt deforestation.

You can’t have lasting sustainability without social inclusion

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Solar panels that only the rich can afford. Urban bike-share programs that limit participation to those using credit cards. Pricey organic grocery stores for communities where many people rely on SNAP benefits. No matter how well-intentioned, if a solution isn’t appropriate for part of the population, then it is not truly a sustainable solution.

In the five videos below, all produced at GreenBiz events, we hear a constant refrain: If we want sustainability solutions to be effective and lasting, and sustainable in their own right, they must address diverse interests. This involves reaching out to low-income communities and communities of color as bases of knowledge and experience. This also makes business sense — companies that consider these communities with their sustainability strategy have the opportunity to grow their customer base and markets.

If nothing else, these videos entreat us to stop for a moment when we hear a proposed solution, be it a new city policy or a new mobile app, and to ask ourselves, “A solution for whom?”

Why Won’t American Business Push for Action on Climate?

Read the full story at E360.

Many U.S. corporations have adopted environmentally friendly practices and touted themselves as green companies. But when it comes to government climate policy, these businesses have been largely silent and support politicians who oppose taking any action.

Gore to Phase Out Perfluorinated Chemicals, Develop New Waterproofing Coatings

Read the full story from Environmental Leader.

Gore Fabrics says it will eliminate perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) of environmental concern from its products by 2023.

Gore, which supplies products including jackets and shoes to major outdoor apparel makers including Patagonia and The North Face, calls the move an “important milestone in its long-term journey towards continuously reducing the environmental footprint of its products throughout their full life cycle.”

Sustainable Procurement Increases Revenue Growth, Study Says

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

Fifty percent of sustainable procurement leaders increased their revenue from sustainability initiatives, a 33 percent increase over non-leaders, according to the results of the latest EcoVadis/HEC Sustainable Procurement Barometer.

The research, which was compiled through a survey of 120 supply chain professionals globally, found that almost all organizations (97 percent) place a high level of importance on sustainable procurement. This continues the upward trajectory of previous years, illustrating how established the field has become in less than 10 years’ time, EcoVadis says.

‘Greenwashing’ Costing Walmart $1 Million

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

Walmart has agreed to pay $1 million to settle greenwashing claims that allege the nation’s largest retailer sold plastic products that were misleadingly labeled “biodegradable” or “compostable” in violation of California law.

Chemical Challenge Targets Technologies to Overcome Environmental Management Hurdles

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

How to enable wastewater-free chemical sites? That is the question — or at least one of questions AkzoNobel wants startup firms and other innovators to answer in its Chemicals Startup Challenge.

The aim of the AkzoNobel Chemicals Startup Challenge, launched in conjunction with KPMG, is to identify interesting startups and solutions that have a strategic fit with AkzoNobel’s businesses and develop partnerships with them. The challenge will give the winners the chance to see their ideas become a commercial reality.