Thinking Outside the Bulb: Innovative Companies Switch on Lumens as a Service

Read the full post from the Rocky Mountain Institute.

The transition to low-cost, highly efficient clean energy technology is being accelerated by an accompanying revolution in innovative business models to deploy that technology. This new approach can be seen in a number of clean energy markets; whether the underlying technology is a recent innovation, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), or well established, like automobiles. As with other similar industry shifts, the fundamental drivers are sound economics combined with the right business model.

A recent example is Lumens as a Service (LaaS), which is the subject of a May 2017 report from RMI. The opportunity is enormous. According to one study, potential building energy efficiency savings could exceed $1 trillion over a decade. The opportunity is particularly compelling for lighting, as it represents about 10 percent of commercial electricity consumption, as reported by the U.S. Energy Information Administration in 2016.

Does Wasting Home Heating Make You See (Infra)red?

Read the full post from the Rocky Mountain Institute.

Have you ever wanted x-ray vision, or to see the hidden features of your home? The City of Vancouver has launched a new effort to make energy use more visible to its residents, complete with rainbow-colored images of their homes that show details invisible to the naked eye. Using thermal imaging to show heat loss in roughly 15,000 homes in five neighborhoods, Vancouver aims to help residents uncover wasted energy. How can making invisible aspects of a home visible drive energy savings and economic development?

Living Green 365: Greening your home’s exterior

Read the full story from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.

Summer is an ideal time to work on home improvements that will help your home last longer, keep you healthy, and increase energy efficiency. Take a walk around your home and assess what improvements need doing this summer.

Rainwater Harvesting Increasingly Helps Companies Reduce Stormwater Fees & Energy Use

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

Commercial enterprises are increasingly installing various rainwater harvesting systems for water conservation purposes. Harvesting can also reduce stormwater runoff and fees, and helps solve potable, non-potable, and energy challenges. Commercial property owners are beginning to realize how much stormwater fees are costing them, says Zachary Popkin, program manager for the Energy Coordinating Agency in Philadelphia (via the Forester Network).

The case for office buildings with windows that open

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Well-designed, naturally ventilated buildings can cut the energy of air-conditioned buildings in half, as they don’t suffer from energy-intensive heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems.

Silent Saver Under Attack: Why We Need the Building Technologies Office

Read the full story from ACEEE.

Are you happy to have cheap, efficient light bulbs that don’t flicker and hum? How about a large refrigerator that uses less electricity than the old incandescent bulb? A small government office has played a key role in all of these innovations and now helps the average American family save almost $500 each year in lower energy bills.

Yet this silent saver is under attack. Like ENERGY STAR® and other effective federal energy efficiency programs, the Building Technologies Office (BTO) would be slashed in the administration’s proposed budget for 2018. It may not be “sexy,” as the last president once called insulation. But few offices are more important to consumers.

Our recent fact sheet shows how BTO helps consumers save money, creates jobs, fosters innovation, makes businesses more competitive, and helps states and local governments. BTO is one of 11 program offices in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office, which in turn is a small part of the Department of Energy.

At a cost of less than $2 per household, BTO is helping you save almost $500. Actually, that’s just in appliances, equipment, and lighting covered by efficiency standards that BTO issues. BTO helps throughout what I call the virtuous spiral of energy efficiency market transformation.

American households use a variety of lightbulbs as CFL and LED adoption increases

Read the full story from the Energy Information Administration.

As lighting technologies evolve and adapt to federal standards, lighting in U.S. homes is in a state of transition. Data from the 2015 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) show that, as of 2015, most homes in the United States used more than one type of lightbulb, primarily a mix of incandescent and compact fluorescent (CFL). Adoption of light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs has been increasing, with 29% of U.S. households reporting at least one LED bulb installed.