City Ordinances and Policies of Successful Zero Waste Communities

Read the full post from SWEEP.

As the number of communities embracing Zero Waste grows to more than two hundred within the United States, a pattern can be observed from the programs that have achieved success. As new communities consider the bold step forward toward enhancing their diversion programs and declaring Zero Waste goals, planning for the future becomes essential. Watching other communities expand their programs, and engage in the learning processes of collection, processing, marketing of hard to recycle materials, as well as deploying new public education and outreach motivation programs is important for those ready to move forward and explore the new frontiers of Zero Waste.

Leaving the Gray Behind

Read the full story from U.S. EPA.

Researchers with EPA’s Net Zero Program are working with the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas Unified School District 475, and other partners to demonstrate and assess green infrastructure technologies and performance at Fort Riley, an Army base in Kansas.

Greener City Streets Aren’t Just About Traffic. They’re About Rainwater, Too.

Read the full story in Governing.

As cities push to become more environmentally friendly, transportation planners are being asked to consider how both traffic and water flows through their streets.

Can States and Cities Really Uphold the Paris Climate Deal?

Read the full story in Governing.

They have pledged to carry out the landmark accord on behalf of America. We asked environmental experts for the most effective and politically practical ways they can help do that.

Ginger Spencer: The Woman Paid to Talk Trash [Episode 7]

Listen to the podcast at Governing.

Ginger Spencer is an unapologetic trash talker.

As public works director for Phoenix, she oversees all things waste for the nation’s fifth-largest city.

It may be a smelly job, but it’s certainly not small. Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton wants to make the city the most sustainable in the world and to achieve zero waste by 2050. To get there, it’s largely up to Spencer.

A south Phoenix native, Spencer has been a passionate public servant in her hometown for two decades. As she explains in our interview, the federal level is for people who want to write policy, the local level is for people who want to make policy happen.

Listen to the latest episode of “The 23%: Conversations With Women in Government” below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or Stitcher, and check out our archives.

Webinar: The Secret to Managing a Successful Mandatory Recycling Ordinance

June 21, 2017 — noon CDT
Register at https://www.re-trac.com/the-secret-to-managing-a-successful-mandatory-recycling-ordinance-webinar/

Does your community use mandatory recycling to support its waste diversion goals? This presentation will teach you how to work with your community to increase recycling, improve compliance rates, and monitor progress. Register to attend this webinar to discover how local governments use technology to manage and measure their mandatory recycling programs.

After attending this webinar, you will:

  • be ready to apply the 3E Strategy to optimize your MRO
  • be equipped with best practices to improve compliance rates
  • be motivated to implement proven systems to help you manage your MRO
  • be armed with valuable lessons from experienced communities

This presentation is the second webinar in a two-part series about Mandatory Recycling Ordinances. The first webinar in the series had over 250 attendees and received rave reviews. You can read Resource Recycling’s article about it or sign up to receive a link to the recording and the MRO Starter Kit.

How New York Is Turning Food Waste Into Compost and Gas

Read the full story in the New York Times.

New Yorkers already have blue and green bins for recycling glass, metal, paper and plastic. But now brown bins for organic waste are starting to appear all over the city. These plastic totems are part of the city’s multimillion-dollar campaign to cut down on greenhouse gas emissions and reliance on landfills, and to turn food scraps and yard waste into compost and, soon, clean energy.