You’re about to see a big change to the sell-by dates on food

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

The majority of Americans have no clear idea what “sell by” labels are trying to tell them. But after 40 years of letting us guess, the grocery industry has made moves to clear up the confusion.

On Wednesday, the Food Marketing Institute and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, the two largest trade groups for the grocery industry, announced that they’ve adopted standardized, voluntary regulations to clear up what product date labels mean. Where manufacturers now use any of 10 separate label phrases, ranging from “expires on” to “better if used by,” they’ll now be encouraged to use only two: “Use By” and “Best if Used By.”

The former is a safety designation, meant to indicate when perishable foods are no longer good. “Best if Used By” is a quality descriptor — a subjective guess of when the manufacturer thinks the product should be consumed for peak flavor.

Supermarkets should be cutting food waste, not relying on charities

Read the full story in The Guardian.

As public outrage over food waste grows, almost every British supermarket has responded to consumer pressure and linked up with food redistribution organisations such as FareShare and Foodcycle.

But while good practice is emerging, supermarkets’ work with charities is barely denting the waste problem. Fareshare, for example, estimates it accesses just 2% of supermarkets’ available food surplus.

Bacardi Circular Economy Initiative Diverts Fruit Waste from Bars, Produces Soap

Read the full story at Environmental Leader.

Bacardi’s 42Below Vodka brand’s circular economy initiative — the project collects used lemons, martini olives and other fruit waste from bars, turns it into liquid soap and sends it back to the bars for free — has diverted 400 kilograms of fruit waste from landfills since it launched in December 2016.

Supermarket selling only salvaged food waste opens in Germany

Read the full story in Deutsche Welle.

The first supermarket to sell only salvaged food waste has opened in Germany. It marks a small step towards a zero-waste society – but a major shift in social awareness, says DW reporter Irene Banos Ruiz.

Illinois: Area stores join movement to sell ‘ugly’ foods, reduce waste

Read the full story in the Daily Review Atlas.

Hy-Vee has partnered with global produce company Robinson Fresh to offer a line of “Misfits,” or “ugly” produce, at almost all of its more than 240 stores, according to a news release from Hy-Vee. The items are delivered weekly based on what’s available, and are sold on average at a 30 percent discount, the release said.