Webinar: Measuring Amounts and Causes of Wasted Food

Thursday, November 30, noon-1:30 CST
Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2093131874937191681

This webinar will feature emerging research and insights from pioneering efforts led by the Natural Resource Defense Council (NRDC), and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in collaboration with Portland State University.  This research is intended to help governments, NGOs, businesses and funders better understand opportunities to reduce avoidable wasted food through improved measurement and more effective prevention, rescue, and recovery strategies.

Archives from past webinars available at https://westcoastclimateforum.com/resources/webinars/upcoming

 

Farm to School Grant Program

The purpose of the USDA Farm to School Grant Program is to assist eligible entities in implementing farm to school programs that improve access to local foods in eligible schools. On an annual basis, USDA awards up to $5 million in competitive grants for training, supporting operations, planning, purchasing equipment, developing school gardens, developing partnerships, and implementing farm to school programs. The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 tasked USDA with supporting farm to school efforts through grants, training, technical assistance, and research. For FY 2018, we offer the following grants:

  • Implementation grants are intended to help schools, school districts, state and local agencies, Indian tribal organizations, small- and medium-sized agricultural producers or groups of small- and medium-sized agricultural producers, and non-profit entities working with schools or school districts to scale or further develop existing farm to school initiatives. Implementation awards range from $50,000 – $100,000.
  • Planning grants are for schools or school districts, state and local agencies, Indian tribal organizations, small- and medium-sized agricultural producers or groups of small- and medium-sized agricultural producers, and non-profit entities working with schools or school districts that are just getting started on farm to school activities. These funds are intended to help these entities organize and structure their efforts for maximum impact by embedding known best practices into early design considerations. Planning awards range from $20,000 – $50,000.
  • Training grants are intended for state and local agencies, Indian tribal organizations, small- and medium-sized agricultural producers or groups of small- and medium-sized agricultural producers, and non-profit entities to support trainings that strengthen farm to school supply chains, or trainings that provide technical assistance in the area of local procurement, food safety, culinary education, and/or integration of agriculture‐based curriculum. Training awards range from $20,000 – $50,000.

Elementary school ‘share tables’ keep unwanted lunch food out of trash

Read the full story in the Orlando Sentinel.

As 9-year-old Sabrina Agosto left her school’s lunch line, she dropped her carton of milk on the cafeteria’s “share and donation” table and then snagged an extra yogurt.

“I don’t like milk,” explained the fourth grader at Aloma Elementary School in Orange County. “I really like them,” she said of her twin containers of strawberry yogurt.

Lunchtime at Aloma means a steady stream of youngsters putting items they don’t want on the table and picking up extras of things they do like. On a recent afternoon, containers of milk and yogurt, wrapped cheese sticks, and packages of crackers, orange slices and coleslaw all came to and then left the table.

Whatever isn’t picked up by students is donated to a nearby church that gives the food to the homeless.

By using surplus food, U.S. cities could tackle hunger, waste problems

Read the full story from Reuters.

Apples, bread, pasta and coffee are high on the list of foods worth $218 billion Americans dump in the bin or pour down the drain each year, costing them and the environment dear, a green group said on Wednesday.

Under growing pressure to deal with the 40 percent of food households, restaurants, grocers and others throw away, U.S. cities must find new ways to stop waste going into landfill and get edible food to those who need it, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) said in two reports.

RFP: 2018 California Statewide Waste Characterization Study

Download the request for proposals.

The purpose of this Contract is for CalRecycle to acquire services that include two parts:

  1. A comprehensive disposal facility-based statewide waste characterization study to gather accurate, representative data on the disposed waste stream, and
  2. A generator-based study of food waste disposed by certain business types.

The results of the studies will be used to identify the types and amounts of materials disposed by California residents and businesses so that appropriate policies, strategies and programs can be selected to reduce their disposal. This will allow California to effectively strive toward the statutory mandates of 75 percent statewide recycling and the organics reductions required by SB 1383 (Lara, Chapter 395, Statutes of 2016) while conserving resources and minimizing the environmental, climate, and public health impacts associated with disposal.

Let the Guest-Imator help create the perfect (and less wasteful) Thanksgiving meal

Read the full story at Mother Nature Network.

Buying the right amount of food for Thanksgiving sometimes takes guesswork. You want to have enough, but don’t want to be overwhelmed with leftovers.

Save the Food wants to remove some of that guesswork while helping to eliminate food waste with its Guest-Imator dinner party calculator. Easy-to-use and free, the digital calculator helps determine how much food to buy and serve for holiday meals and other dinner parties. It also helps to prepare for leftovers if you want them. (And who doesn’t want to make sure they have enough extra turkey and trimmings for a few Thanksgiving sandwiches?)

Why Americans have stopped eating leftovers

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

American consumers throw away 27 million tons of food each year, according to the food waste coalition ReFED, clogging landfills, generating greenhouse gasses, and costing the economy an estimated $144 billion.

The solution, however, could be simple: get people to eat leftovers again.

Once the mainstay of weekday lunchboxes and thrifty home cooks, leftovers today constitute the single largest source of edible food waste in U.S. homes, according to a new study by the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental group.