Watch your waste: The problem with airline food and packaging

Read the full story from CNN.

According to the International Air Transport Association, airlines produced 5.2 million tons of waste last year, and will produce over 10 million tons annually by 2030. While the statistic includes a host of disposable products — from wine bottles to plastic toothbrushes — a large chunk is directly related to food service. From harnessing behavioral data and using cups that can be composted to donating nonperishable food items and on-board recycling, here’s what airlines are doing to divert cabin waste from landfills.

NYC Food Waste Fair to offer businesses ‘soup to nuts’ display of reduction and diversion

Read the full story in Waste Dive.

Anyone in New York’s service industry is well-acquainted with the vast amounts of food waste coming out of kitchens and businesses on a daily basis. Though unless that business is big enough to be covered by the city’s organics diversion mandate, they may not know why or how to do anything about it yet. An upcoming city-organized event aims to give those businesses so much information that they’ll have no excuse but to start.

On July 25, the NYC Food Waste Fair will bring together professionals from the recycling industry and the food service industry for a “soup to nuts” display of what’s possible. Organized by the Foundation for New York’s Strongest and the Department of Sanitation (DSNY), the event will feature exhibitions, workshops and demonstrations about every major step of the food recovery process.

Restaurants Are Returning Their Empty Oyster Shells To The Ocean To Rebuild Decimated Reefs

Read the full story in Fast Company.

A partnership between a nonprofit and a waste-management company in Mobile, Alabama has already diverted 2.8 million oyster shells from landfill.

Is It Really So Offal? ‘Ugly Food’ Boot Camp Entices Chefs And Diners

Read the full story from NPR.

This meal taps into JBF’s boot camp initiative and hits more than one sweet spot for chefs. Most obviously, the less food that goes in the trash, the more money a chef saves in an industry notorious for tight margins. But even before that, if a chef can buy the produce that a farm otherwise cannot sell — as in the case of the fruit and vegetables used for tonight’s dinner, which was supplied by food-rescue organization Hungry Harvest — that chef is helping farmers earn a living wage. And offering up an animal that promotes healthy agriculture can help cooks work toward saving the planet to boot. Win-win-win.

Ikea aims to halve food waste at its restaurants by mid-2020

Read the full story at CNBC.

Ikea, which as well as being the No.1 furniture retailer also runs one of the world’s biggest restaurant chains, aims to halve its food waste in three years to save money and reduce its environmental footprint.

I Want To Eat Fish Responsibly. But The Seafood Guides Are So Confusing!

Read the full story from NPR.

This month, I ventured to ask the man behind the counter at a Whole Foods Market what kind of shrimp he was selling. “I don’t know,” he replied. “I think they’re just normal shrimp.” I glanced at the sustainable seafood guide on my phone. There were 80 entries for shrimp, none of them listed “normal.”

What about the cod? Was it Atlantic or Pacific? Atlantic. How was it caught? I asked. “I’m not sure,” he said, looking doubtfully at a creamy fish slab. “With nets, I think. Not with harpoons.”

The shrimp had a blue sticker shaped like a fish on it, which appeared to be some type of official approval. Plus, they were on sale. I bought half a pound.

I was using the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch app, one of a handful of sustainable seafood guides which base their recommendations of sustainable seafood on a range of factors, including where the fish came from, how it was caught or farmed and how the local environment was affected. Spend an hour trying to make sense of these guides, and you may feel more confused than when you started — and guilty about putting an unsuspecting grocery employee on the spot.

Bacardi Circular Economy Initiative Diverts Fruit Waste from Bars, Produces Soap

Read the full story at Environmental Leader.

Bacardi’s 42Below Vodka brand’s circular economy initiative — the project collects used lemons, martini olives and other fruit waste from bars, turns it into liquid soap and sends it back to the bars for free — has diverted 400 kilograms of fruit waste from landfills since it launched in December 2016.