Warriors Against Waste: These Restaurants And Bars Are Aiming For Zero

Read the full story from NPR.

Zero waste has become a sort of buzzword in the foodie world recently. From San Francisco to New York, London to Amsterdam, restaurateurs are challenging themselves to reduce the staggering amount of food waste that the industry generates (an estimated 571,000 tons annually by U.S. restaurants alone) and the amount of other resources they use — including electricity and water. From rejecting plastic straws to making byproducts like whey the star of a meal — restaurants are approaching that challenge in different ways.

Why Restaurants are Going Straw-less in Seattle by 2018

Read the full story in Waste360.

Around the world scientists, environmentalists and even manufacturers are looking at plastics and their impact on ocean life, the environment and the health of human life as well. While banning plastic disposable straws seems like a rather small step in a complex ecosystem, environmentalists and local government officials are finding it something that can be acted on in a simple way.

The city of Seattle passed a law nearly a decade ago requiring food service vendors to switch to compostable or recyclable wares when available for use. By July 1, 2018, disposable plastic straws and cutlery will be replaced in all Seattle food service venues with compostable or recyclable options.

Waste360 sat down with Sego Jackson, strategic advisor of waste prevention and product stewardship for the city of Seattle’s Public Utilities, to discuss how an ordinance passed eight years ago laid the foundation for replacing the plastic straws and cutlery in city restaurants.

A Step-by-Step Guide to Conducting a Wasted Food Assessment with the Reducing Wasted Food and Packaging Toolkit

This webinar series, part of U.S. EPA’s Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Web Academy, provides comprehensive guidance on conducting a tracking assessment using EPA’s Reducing Wasted Food & Packaging Toolkit. The toolkit includes a guide and a tracking spreadsheet to assist commercial and institutional food services in tracking and reducing their food and packaging waste by implementing reduction strategies. Reducing food and packaging waste saves money, reduces the environmental impacts of waste, and improves organizational image.

For more resources on reducing food waste, visit EPA’s Sustainable Management of Food site. The Tools for Preventing and Diverting Wasted Food page is particularly useful.

Food Loss Prevention Options for Grade Schools, Manufacturers, Restaurants, Universities and Grocery Stores

Businesses and organizations can learn to effectively prevent wasted food by taking source reduction steps such as inventorying supplies, changing processes and buying less. EPA has developed tip sheets for grade schools, food manufacturers, restaurants, universities and grocery stores that provide suggestions for ways these sectors can prevent food loss and waste.

Anthony Bourdain Would Like To Talk To You About Food Waste

Read the full post at Gothamist.

If anyone can make the very important and urgent topic of food waste sexy and interesting maybe it’s Anthony Bourdain? The chef and TV host is the executive producer Wasted! The Story Of Food Waste, a documentary film on the subject that premiered at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival, with a wider release coming in October. Sorry John Oliver; maybe get some more tattoos?

The film—directed by The Mind of a Chef and Bourdain properties The Layover and Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown producers/directors Anna Chai and Nari Kye— draws attention to the crisis while also offering solutions from industry luminaries like chef Dan Barber, who’s been a local champion of the cause at his Blue Hill restaurants. The film also includes appearances and insights from the likes of Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura and Danny Bowien, among others.

Potato waste processing may be the road to enhanced food waste conversion

Read the full story from Penn State University.

With more than two dozen companies in Pennsylvania manufacturing potato chips, it is no wonder that researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel approach to more efficiently convert potato waste into ethanol. This process may lead to reduced production costs for biofuel in the future and add extra value for chip makers.

Using potato mash made from the peelings and potato residuals from a Pennsylvania food-processor, researchers triggered simultaneous saccharification — the process of breaking down the complex carbohydrate starch into simple sugars — and fermentation — the process in which sugars are converted to ethanol by yeasts or other microorganisms in bioreactors.

Beermaker Carlsberg zeroes in on zero

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

The obvious way to start a feature about Carlsberg’s sustainability strategy would be to jokingly refer to it as “probably the best sustainability strategy in the world.” But could the advert-inspired hyperbole actually be justified?

That is the question prompted by a recently unveiled set of goals that promise to turn the global brewing giant into an organization with “zero carbon footprint, zero water waste, zero irresponsible drinking and a zero accidents culture.” The ambitions are commendable and are backed by a host of specific medium and long-term targets, but are they achievable? Can a multinational with a complex supply chain and sites in 36 countries really eradicate its carbon footprint? Can one company convince populations around the world to give up irresponsible drinking for good?