Bacardi Circular Economy Initiative Diverts Fruit Waste from Bars, Produces Soap

Read the full story at Environmental Leader.

Bacardi’s 42Below Vodka brand’s circular economy initiative — the project collects used lemons, martini olives and other fruit waste from bars, turns it into liquid soap and sends it back to the bars for free — has diverted 400 kilograms of fruit waste from landfills since it launched in December 2016.

New study finds extensive use of fluorinated chemicals in fast food wrappers

Read the full story from the University of Notre Dame.

Americans may be consuming fast food wrapped in paper treated with perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) — the same chemicals used in stain-resistant products, firefighting materials and nonstick cookware, according to a new study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Further with Food: Center for Food Loss and Waste Solutions

Further With Food is a website to find and share information and tools dedicated to reducing food loss and waste in the United States. This site provides a broad spectrum of users — from experts to novices — with high-quality information and proven solutions to reduce food loss and waste as well as a platform to share research, experiences, innovative approaches, and tools.

The 10 most sustainable coffee businesses in the United States

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

While most specialty coffee pros obsess over the transformative quality of the world’s favorite drupe, it’s not every day you find a roasting brand equally focused on the environment. And yet some forward-thinking coffee roasters and retailers are asking what they can do to reduce their carbon footprint — for good reason.

Experts tell us that climate change is already beginning to have a substantial impact on the coffee-producing regions of the world. As temperatures rise and weather patterns change, existing coffee lands could decrease in size by as much as 50 percent over the next three decades, say organizations such as Conservation International. As coffee farms move up mountains to escape rising temperatures, the resulting deforestation could exacerbate the problem even more.

Ironically, coffee is one of a number of industries that are aggravating the problem by producing large quantities of greenhouse gas (GHG). A 2012 study (PDF) that followed coffee from Costa Rica to Europe showed that 53 percent of GHGs produced by the coffee industry occur on the roaster side, in cafes, through activities such as heating water, turning on the lights and producing waste in the form of to-go materials.

Lessons In Leftovers

Read the full story in Full Service Restaurants.

In June, five of the top Bay Area chefs collaborated on a “Waste Not, Want Not” dinner, held at The Perennial in San Francisco. Organized by the Natural Resources Defense Council (nrdc), the benefit had a two-fold goal: to raise money and to showcase a stellar meal made largely using leftover foods.

The chefs—Dominique Crenn of Atelier Crenn, Nick Balla and Cortney Burns of Bar Tartine, Traci Des Jardins of Jardinière, and Chris Kiyuna of The Perennial—each prepared an appetizer and an entrée, and Chef Kiyuna prepared a dessert.

During the event, the chefs talked to guests about the food and the chefs’ personal philosophies about food waste.

Feed People, Not the Garbage

Read the full post from U.S. EPA.

The Green Dining Alliance (GDA) has always encouraged our member restaurants to minimize their food waste by reducing portion sizes and composting food waste. So when we heard that EPA was co-leading a new initiative to reduce U.S. food waste by 50 percent by 2030, we had to get involved. The GDA joined EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge as an Endorser, promoting the challenge by suggesting our members to join up as Participants.

Farm to cafeteria table: The new local food frontier

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

The next time someone points to the need for more farmers’ markets as a way to help move local food from a trend to a substantive cultural shift, you might consider telling them about the power of institutional purchasing. It may sound less interesting and, on the surface, it certainly is. (Who doesn’t love buying purple carrots to the sound of a didgeridoo?) But bear with us.