Fast fashion giant Shein aims to cut emissions 25% by 2030

Read the full story at Supply Chain Dive.

Online retailer Shein plans to cut emissions across its supply chain by 25% by 2030, the company announced in September.

The targets are among the first public steps to cut carbon emissions for the company, which has become a formidable player in the U.S. fast fashion market. The growth has come with a heavy carbon footprint. Last year, Shein’s operations produced 6.3 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

H&M Group wants all of its clothing to be made using recycled, sustainable components

Read the full story at Environment + Energy Leader.

The H&M Group is a multinational clothing company. The Swedish retailer is known for “fast fashion,” which is clothing that is made and sold cheaply. The company has shops in 75 locations worldwide with 4,702 stores, although they are marketed under different brands. The company positions itself as a leader in the area of sustainability. Its goal is to be carbon positive by 2040. In the nearer term, it wants to reduce its emissions by 56% by 2030, using 2019 as a baseline, and to make its clothing using sustainable components.

For Shein and other fast fashion offenders, ESG-washing is not the answer

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

If reports are to be believed, Chinese fast-fashion behemoth Shein is trying to make amends, shifting its image to justify a steadily dropping $100 billion valuation ahead of an ambitious IPO in 2024. It’s got a lot of work to do. While the company controls most of the category at 28 percent, racking in $15.7 billion in sales 2021, it’s also among the worst in environmental sustainability, social justice and corporate governance (ESG). To keep prices low, and to stay relatively free of regulation, it relies on suppliers in China, where the Uyghur populations suffer forced labor and dangerous working conditions. Also, with wasteful environmental practices ingrained in its model, fast fashion is so harmful that most regulators believe it is irredeemable. As the king of fast fashion, Shein has a lot to answer for.

Still, as the company hires new sustainability-focused leaders and promises a new conscious approach, its efforts to market an enthusiastic ambition to jump on the ESG bandwagon should put it on the path to redemption, right? Not quite.

Closing the loop on commercial textile waste

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Founded by Jessica Schreiber and Camille Tagle, FABSCRAP was created to meet New York City’s commercial textile recycling needs. With the expansion of fast-fashion companies and the demand for trendy clothing growing every day, a company such as FABSCRAP coming alongside corporations to responsibly handle textile waste is more needed than ever. 

Through their work, materials that traditionally would have gone to landfill are being properly recycled and made available for reuse. 

Their volunteer network has grown from just crafters to anyone with a passion to help the industry become more sustainable. FABSCRAP provides convenient pickup and recycling of textiles for businesses in New York City and Philadelphia. 

Schreiber and Tagle met with the Impact Report to discuss their careers in waste management and fashion, textile waste from mills to landfills, and to tell us about their new FABSCRAP Philadelphia location. 

Read more about their impact in their most recent report: FABSCRAP 2020 Annual Report.

Why microplastic pollution is still fashion’s concern

Read the full story at Sourcing Journal.

Although numerous residents of New Jersey are still openly bemoaning the plastic bag ban that took effect in May, millions of people around the globe are participating in Plastic Free July, an initiative of the Plastic Free Foundation, an organization whose vision is “seeing a world free of plastic waste.” Included in that waste is microplastic ocean pollution, more than a third of which stems from apparel made synthetic fibers.

‘The golden age of thrifting is over’

Read the full story in the New York Times.

A glut of fast fashion has made its way into local thrift stores, making it hard for women who have been purchasing secondhand for decades to find quality garments they can wear.

How fashion giants recast plastic as good for the planet

Read the full story from the New York Times.

An influential system overseen by retailers and clothing makers ranks petroleum-based synthetics like “vegan leather” as more environmentally sound than natural fibers.

H&M, Lululemon back $250 million fund to decarbonize fashion supply chain

Read the full story in ESG Today.

Fashion sustainability-focused nonprofit Apparel Impact Institute (Aii) announced today the launch of a new $250 million Fashion Climate Fund, with lead funders including Lululemon, H&M Group, H&M Foundation, and the Schmidt Family Foundation.

The new fund aims to drive actions and solutions supporting the industry’s goal to halve emissions by 2030, with a particular focus on the supply chain, which accounts for the vast majority of the fashion industry’s emissions, according to Aii.

Can I buy fast fashion and not feel guilty?

Read the full story in the New York Times.

I often hear about avoiding fast fashion because it’s better for the planet, in part because it is highly disposable and people cycle it through to the landfill too quickly. But can I feel just a little less guilty about my fast fashion if I hold on to my clothes until they wear out? I’m a budget-minded shopper, and though I can occasionally afford to buy a piece from an ethical brand, the truth is that fast fashion is what keeps me clothed.

Can fashion designers really learn to be sustainable?

Read the full story at The Cut.

Most traditional fashion programs now offer sustainability courses but approach the subject inside silos — students take biology and broad offerings on “ecology and environmental problems” — while issues of neocolonialism and human rights go unexplored.