EPA introduces $22.6M cleanup plan for former DuPont industrial site

Read the full story in Waste Dive. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a 60-day public comment period on a proposed $22.6 million cleanup project for a former DuPont industrial area in East Chicago, IN. The agency is holding a public meeting Jan 10. EPA has proposed removing more than 61,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil …

UPDATE: Lawsuits begin in Michigan sludge dumping case

Read the full story in Waste Dive. The first round of lawsuits against Wolverine World Wide in Michigan have been filed, as reported by MLive. Attorneys who are representing four homeowners with contaminated drinking water say as many as 50 more cases may be filed soon. The litigants are seeking unspecified monetary damages and cleanup of …

Video: Modified sponge mops up oil but not water

Watch the video at Chemical & Engineering News. In an effort to provide a cheap, reusable method to clean up water after oil and chemical spills, Tanmay Das and Debasish Haldar of the Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Kolkata, coated a polystyrene sponge with a compound that allows it to absorb a wide range of oil …

New database catalogues plants that soak up contamination

Read the full story at Phys.org. Hyperaccumulators are unusual plants that can absorb much larger amounts of metal compounds in their leaves and stems than normal plants, and they are very useful for cleaning up contaminated land. As described in a New Phytologist article, researchers have published a database that provides easier access to information on the …

10 examples of why the Superfund program matters

Read the full story from Mother Nature Network. The U.S. Superfund program was created in 1980 to clean up the country's most toxic places. It gave the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) new authority to identify the parties responsible for noxious hazards nationwide, and to make them clean up their messes on their own dime. The …

How Military Outsourcing Turned Toxic

Read the full story in ProPublica. The military is one of the country’s largest polluters, with an inventory of toxic sites on American soil that once topped 39,000. At many locations, the Pentagon has relied on contractors like U.S. Technology to assist in cleaning and restoring land, removing waste, clearing unexploded bombs, and decontaminating buildings, …