Category: Solar

Carbon neutrality and solar’s role in ASEAN nations

Read the full story in pv magazine.

The Paris Agreement has been signed by all ASEAN nations and almost all members have declared a carbon emissions reduction target. The diversity in ASEAN’s readiness for energy transition is reflected in the wide-ranging nationally determined contribution targets set for reducing greenhouse gases. An immediate quick win for the renewable energy transition is the harnessing of solar power from an abundance of resources in the region.

Erthos eliminates trackers in utility-scale solar, mounts PV panels on the ground

Read the full story at Canary Media.

If solar panels were free, how would you build the ideal utility-scale solar plant? This startup’s answer: “You’d put them on the ground.”

New process to recycle silicon, silver and glass from end-of-life PV panels

Read the full story from pv magazine.

A €4.8 million (AU$7.5 million) EU-funded research project is aiming to develop a process that allows recovering all components of a photovoltaic module.

Lithium-ion battery soaks up the sun for recharge

Read the full story in Chemical & Engineering News.

Hooking up solar panels to batteries is the norm for storing extra energy produced when the sun is shining. To streamline this process, researchers now report a lithium-ion battery that can be directly charged in sunlight, with no solar cells needed (Nano Lett. 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00298).

Enough solar and wind to clean the U.S. power grid… available yesterday

Read the full story at pv magazine.

Data show that the U.S. has more than 750 GWac of electricity generation capacity in interconnection queues, with 90% of that clean energy-related. But how much actually will be built?

Solar industry launches diverse suppliers database

Read the full story from the Solar Energy Industries Association.

Today the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) is releasing the Diverse Suppliers Database, a free platform that will highlight and elevate minority, women, disabled, veteran, and LGBTQ+ owned businesses operating in the solar and storage industries. More than 120 diverse companies are listed in the database, and the platform will remain open for submissions.

The database will help solar companies more thoughtfully consider their supplier networks and partnerships. The businesses listed in the database represent a variety of companies, including solar and storage installers, roofers, construction companies, electrical contractors, and other vendors or service providers in the solar and energy storage sectors.

ClearGen, GreenStruxure announce $500M partnership on renewable microgrids

Read the full story at Utility Dive.

ClearGen, the Blackstone Group sustainability fund, will commit up to $500 million in partnership with GreenStruxure, a joint venture of Schneider Electric and Huck Capital, to develop renewable energy microgrid solutions for commercial and industrial customers.

GreenStruxure launched in September 2020 and offers no-money-down, modular microgrids installed on-site as part of an energy-as-a-service model. The microgrids serve a variety of users, including small- and medium-sized industrial facilities, schools, hotels and other commercial facilities. 

Through the partnership announced on Tuesday, ClearGen will provide capital and financial expertise, including navigating tax incentives and other market incentives. “This allows us to operate seamlessly for the client as an integrated unit, with transparency and some trusted brand names,” said Clark Wiedetz, chief sales officer for GreenStruxure.

Stop removing your solar panels early, please. It’s creating a huge waste problem for Australia

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by Deepika Mathur (Charles Darwin University) and Imran Muhammad (Massey University)

Installing solar panels is an easy way to lower your carbon footprint and cut electricity bills. But our recent research found there are many incentives to remove them prematurely, adding to Australia’s massive waste problem.

Researchers predict Australia will accumulate 1 million tonnes of solar panel waste by 2047 — the same weight as 19 Sydney Harbour Bridges.

But this number is likely to be higher, as we found people often choose to remove panels after just 10 to 12 years of use. This is much earlier than their estimated end-of-life age of 30 years (and potentially older).

Unfortunately, recycling is just a small part of the solution. So why is this happening, and what can we do about it?

Australia’s shocking ‘material footprint’

Australians have heeded the call to increase renewable energy. The installed capacity of panels across Australia has increased dramatically from 25.3 megawatts in 2007 to 77,078 megawatts in 2017. Likewise, the rooftop solar market capacity has almost doubled between 2014 and 2018.

Australia has committed to the UN Sustainable Development Goal of using fewer resources. And this requires us to use products (like solar panels) efficiently, with less waste. But Australia’s 2020 progress update shows our per capita material footprint is increasing. In fact, it’s one of the highest in the world, at 70% above the OECD average.

It is assumed the primary reason why people remove solar panels is due to technical failures, such as when they’ve reached their expiry after 30 years, or breaking due to extreme weather or during transport. But failing to generate electricity doesn’t explain why many are thrown away prematurely.

So, we interviewed solar panel installers, recycling organisations, advocacy groups and local government waste managers across the Northern Territory. And our resulting qualitative research found social and economic incentives for removing solar panels.

Out with the new, in with the newer

We found a whole system of panels gets removed when only a few panels are damaged, as the new panels must have similar electrical properties to the old.

If the panels are still under warranty, the manufacturer often pays to replace the whole set, even when only a few are faulty. This means working panels are removed alongside the faulty panels, prematurely turning into waste.

Solar panels have also become a commodity item. Many of us dump old phones and cars when newer technology becomes available, and solar panels get the same treatment. After recovering the investment in solar panels through reduced electricity bills, some people are keen to get newer, more efficient models with a new warranty.

Our research also suggests government incentives aimed at rolling out more solar panels have caused consumers to replace their entire solar array. This is because previous rebates didn’t cover the replacement of only one or a few panels.

Finally, the life of solar inverters is usually 10-12 years, much shorter than the 30-year life span of the panels themselves. Some people use this as an opportunity to install a new set of solar panels when they change their inverters.

So why can’t we just recycle them?

There’s currently little research on what we can do with panels when they’re removed for reasons other than technical failure.

Researchers often put forward recycling as the preferred option for removed panels. But sending the growing number of working panels to recycling facilities is a tremendous waste of resources, and increases the burden for panel recycling, which is still in its nascent stages.

But there’s no directive yet at the national level on solar panel disposal, specifically. This means there’s a patchwork of policies across the states and territories for managing this waste.

Victoria, for example, has identified solar panels as the fastest growing waste stream in the state’s overall e-waste flow, and the state government has banned them from landfills.

But such measures wouldn’t work for the Northern Territory, given its lack of processing facilities and the distance to the recycling centres in southern Australia, which are at least 1,500 kilometres away. With ample open land, they’re more likely to end up dumped illegally.

What do we do?

Australia needs clear guidelines at a national level on collecting, transporting, stockpiling and disposing solar panels. A lack of clear policy hampers state, territory and local governments from managing this waste effectively.

By proposing recycling as preferred option to manage this waste, we risk excluding other important options in the waste management hierarchy, such as reducing waste in the first place by making solar panels that last, extending their life.

The federal government has also touted “product stewardship” as a potential solution. This is where those involved in producing, selling, using and disposing products share the responsibility to reduce their environmental impact.

But this model wouldn’t effectively service regional and remote areas, as collecting and transporting goods from remote locations comes at a very high financial and environmental cost.

It’s worth noting some panels do undergo a kind of “second life”. There’s a unique demand for secondhand panels from people who can’t afford new systems, those looking to live off-grid, small organisations keen to reduce energy bills, and mobile home and caravan owners.

But with a number of massive solar farms proposed across northern Australia, it’s more important than ever to explore new strategies to manage removed solar panels, with clear policies and creative solutions.


The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Robin Gregory from Regional Development Australia, Northern Territory to this article.

Deepika Mathur, Research Fellow, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University and Imran Muhammad, Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Massey University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Solar power’s decade of falling costs is thrown into reverse

Read the full story at EnergyWorld.

For the solar industry, the timing couldn’t be worse. Renewable energy finally has a champion in the White House and ambitious climate goals have been announced across Europe and Asia.

Australia’s first solar panel recycling facility is now operational

Read the full story at EQ International.

Australia’s very first solar panel recycling facility is up and running in Thomastown, Melbourne. The plant was completed in September 2020 by Melbourne-based co-operative Lotus Energy.

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