What Will Happen If The U.S. Withdraws From The Paris Climate Agreement

Read the full story in Fast Company.

Trump’s EPA transition leader says the administration will soon move to leave the groundbreaking climate agreement. How will that work, and what will it mean for clean energy in America, and the fate of the world?

Obama in scientific journal: ‘The trend toward clean energy is irreversible’

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

President Obama has long made a moral case for investing in clean energy technologies such as wind and solar, saying the United States and other countries must slash their emissions of greenhouse gases to stave off the worse effects of global warming.

But writing Monday in the journal Science, the president also makes an economic argument for a national policy that embraces renewable energy, rather than the renewed focus on fossil fuel production that his successor has promised.

How many jobs does clean energy create?

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Declining costs of wind, solar power and energy efficiency is helping to drive a shift from fossil fuels generally — and coal in particular — to renewable energy and energy efficiency. From the first half of 2015 to the first half of 2016, renewable energy use rose by 9 percent while coal use in the U.S. dropped by 18 percent, according to the Energy Information Administration.

What does this shift mean for jobs? From 2014 to 2015 solar employment increased by 6 percent while employment in upstream oil and gas and support services dropped by 18 percent. This reduction reflects both declining coal consumption and continued reduction in labor intensity. There are now more jobs in the U.S. in solar than in either oil and gas extraction or coal mining.

U.S. Department of Energy Guide to Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles

View the Guide.

More than a dozen alternative fuels are in production or under development for use in alternative fuel vehicles and advanced technology vehicles. Government and private-sector vehicle fleets are the primary users of these fuels and vehicles, but consumers are increasingly interested in them. Using alternative fuels and advanced vehicles instead of conventional fuels and vehicles helps the United States reduce petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

Funding opp: Deployment of Energy Efficiency and Clean Energy on Indian Lands – 2017

Proposals due February 7, 2017
More information available here.

Under this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), DOE’s Office of Indian Energy is soliciting applications from Indian Tribes (including Alaska Native Regional Corporations and Village Corporations) and Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations to:

  1. Install energy efficiency measures and clean energy systems on tribal buildings (Topic Area 1) through:
    1. Deep energy retrofits (Topic Area 1.a.), or
    2. Energy efficiency measures and clean energy systems (Topic Area 1.b.); and/or
  2. Deploy clean energy systems on a community-scale (Topic Area 2).

For purposes of this FOA, an eligible “Indian Tribe” (including Alaska Native villages, but not Alaska Native Regional Corporations or Village Corporations), must be federally recognized as listed in Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive Services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. Applications may also be submitted on behalf of an Indian Tribe(s) by an authorized Tribal Organization or Inter-Tribal Organization, provided evidence of that authority is provided as part of the application.

Under Topic Area 1, DOE is seeking applications for the installation in tribal buildings of (a) deep energy retrofits (multiple energy efficiency measures) to meet at least a 15% reduction in the total of all energy and fuel sources used; and (b) energy efficiency measures and clean energy systems (renewable energy power systems or combined heat and power systems) of at least 10kW or equivalent for heating and/or cooling to meet at least a 20% reduction in the total of all energy and fuel sources used.

Under Topic Area 2, DOE is soliciting applications for the deployment on a community-scale of at least 250 kW (or equivalent for heating and/or cooling) of clean energy systems on Indian lands to provide electricity and/or heating or cooling too many buildings or to an entire tribal community. Any technology proposed must be commercially-proven and warrantied, and the projects proposed under Topic Area 1 must be based on a prior energy audit or industrial energy assessment.

The intended results of the 50% cost shared projects selected under this Funding Opportunity Announcement are immediate cost savings, reduced energy use, and increased energy security for Indian Tribes, Alaskan Native villages, and tribal members.

DOE expects to make approximately $4 million to $6 million of Federal funding available for new awards under this FOA, subject to the availability of appropriated funds. The actual level of funding, if any, depends on Congressional appropriations. DOE anticipates making approximately 6 to 10 awards under this FOA. DOE may issue awards in one, multiple, or none of the topic areas.

Informational Webinar

The DOE Office of Indian Energy will conduct an informational webinar on December 1, 2016 (3:00 Eastern) to provide information on the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to potential applicants. In addition to describing the FOA in detail, information will be provided on who is eligible to apply, what an application needs to include, cost share and other requirements, how to ask questions, and how applications will be selected for funding. If you are unable to attend the webinar, it will be recorded and posted for later viewing.

Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3954444524942948612

 

Trump Can’t Stop the Energy Revolution

Read the full column at Bloomberg.

The planet is warming, dangerously so, and burning more coal will make it worse. President-elect Donald Trump thinks man-made climate change is a hoax and he’s promised to revive the US coal industry by cutting regulation. So renewables are dead in the water, right? Maybe not.