Funding opp: Modular Chemical Process Intensification Institute for Clean Energy Manufacturing

Read the complete RFP at https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/default.aspx#FoaId9121dd0f-ea3d-48b2-89d5-f51c6d379bf1

  • Concept Paper Submission Deadline: 6/15/2016 5:00 PM ET
  • Full Application Submission Deadline: 8/17/2016 5:00 PM ET

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), invests in cutting-edge research, development, and demonstration activities focused on sustainable transportation, renewable power, and energy efficiency. A core element of EERE’s mission is to enhance U.S. global competitiveness in innovation and manufacturing in emerging clean energy industries. To address this core element, EERE launched its Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI) in 2013 with the goal of significantly increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness in the production of clean energy products and in domestic manufacturing across the board by increasing industrial energy productivity. EERE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) plays a key role in executing the mission for CEMI by supporting research and development projects, shared research facilities and technical consortia, and technical assistance programs.

AMO partners with private and public stakeholders to support the research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) of innovative technologies that can improve U.S. competitiveness, save energy, and ensure global leadership in manufacturing of clean energy technologies as well as improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption in manufacturing. Specifically, AMO invests in cost‐shared RD&D activities in support of cross-cutting next generation materials and manufacturing processes that hold high potential to significantly improve energy efficiency and reduce energy-related emissions, industrial waste, and the life‐cycle energy consumption of manufactured products.

EERE’s AMO establishes Manufacturing Innovation Institutes in the President’s National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) as shared research, development, and demonstration facilities to overcome cross-cutting challenges related to the manufacturing of clean energy and energy efficiency products, in addition to challenges associated with improving the energy efficiency of the manufacturing sector across the board.

This FOA supports the establishment of a Manufacturing Innovation Institute on Modular Chemical Process Intensification for Clean Energy Manufacturing. Modular chemical process intensification represents an emerging opportunity for processing industries in the U.S. manufacturing sector to improve energy efficiency, reduce feedstock waste, and improve productivity by merging and integrating separate unit processes (mixing, reactions, separation) into single modular hardware elements of reduced size, with higher efficiency and providing inherent scalability.

Just How Much Power Do Your Electronics Use When They Are ‘Off’?

Read the full story in the New York Times.

Once upon a time, there was a difference between on and off. Now, it’s more complicated: Roughly 50 devices and appliances in the typical American household are always drawing power, even when they appear to be off, estimates Alan Meier, a senior scientist at the Department of Energy’s Berkeley Lab.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: Modular Chemical Process Intensification Institute for Clean Energy Manufacturing

The Energy Department requested proposals for a new Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute as part of the Administration’s broader National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI), which drives collaboration between small- and medium-sized companies, academic institutions, industrial research organizations, and national laboratories.

The Modular Chemical Process Intensification Institute – the fourth led by the Energy Department within the NNMI – represents a critical step in the Administration’s effort to double U.S. energy productivity by 2030. It will focus on developing breakthrough technologies to increase the energy efficiency of manufacturing processes used across an array of U.S. industries.

Proposals for this $70 million funding opportunity announcement are due June 15, 2016.

The Department will also conduct an informational webinar on May 11, 2016 at 3:00pm EDT. This webinar will provide an opportunity to learn more about the program and current solicitation, and ask questions regarding funding opportunity announcement procedures.

To register for this informational webinar, please click here.

In addition to today’s request for proposals, the Department is announcing that the topic of the fifth Energy Department-led institute will be Reducing Embodied Energy and Emissions of Manufactured Materials, focused on lowering energy use through the development of innovative recycling and remanufacturing technologies. More information about the fifth institute will be announced by the end of May 2016.

To access the full funding opportunity announcement, please click here.

To access the official DOE press announcement, please click here.

Can energy efficiency rise to its $279 billion potential and help meet climate goals?

Read the full story from ACEEE.

Energy efficiency financing has seen record growth over the past year. Property-assessed clean energy (PACE) hit a billion dollar milestone, the nation’s largest green bank has roughly $4 billion of projects in the pipeline, and green bond issuance grew from $3 billion four years ago to over $40 billion in 2015. Total energy efficiency investment in buildings is slated to reach $125 billion by 2020, which is still less than half of the estimated $279 billion available.

But is it enough? On one hand, the market is telling us that we are poised to leave hundreds of billions of dollars on the table, while the Paris climate negotiations earlier this year set investment targets of over $200 billion to help avoid climate change. Energy efficiency financing is growing fast, but can it grow fast enough?

Tight budget? Consider other options to fund energy-efficiency projects

Read the full story in Health Facilities Management.

Sustainability groups discuss four financing alternatives to help health care facilities get green initiatives off the ground.

Lifting the High Energy Burden in America’s Largest Cities: How Energy Efficiency Can Improve Low Income and Underserved Communities

Download the document.

Energy burden is the percentage of household income spent on home energy bills. In this report we measure the energy burden of households in 48 of the largest American cities. We find that low-income, African-American, Latino, low-income multifamily, and renter households all spend a greater proportion of their income on utilities than the average family. We also identify energy efficiency as an underutilized strategy that can help reduce high energy burdens by as much as 30%. Given this potential, we describe policies and programs to ramp up energy efficiency investments in low-income and underserved communities.

Critiques of Energy Efficiency Policies and Programs: Some Truth But Also Substantial Mistakes and Bias

Download the white paper.

Several recent studies purport to show that particular energy efficiency programs and policies do not work or are too expensive. This short paper is written for people who are not evaluation experts and are trying to understand what conclusions they can take from these studies. We examine many of these papers and find that while they do have some useful findings, they often include a variety of unreasonable assumptions or outright mistakes that undermine their conclusions. Based on this review, we offer several recommendations on ways we can constructively move forward.