Who Invests in Energy Efficiency and Why?

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This blog post is the second in a three-post series on understanding and increasing investments by businesses and individuals in energy efficiency. In the first post, we discussed current energy efficiency investments in the United States, which we estimate total about $60-115 billion per year. This number includes investments driven by policy, private market investments, and a mix of the two. In this post, we explore who invests in energy efficiency and why, focusing on mainstream businesses and consumers. The third and final post will build on the first two and discuss approaches that could increase efficiency investments in the future.

How many billions do US businesses and individuals invest in energy efficiency each year?

Read the full story from ACEEE.

Energy efficiency investments occur in virtually every sector of the economy. When combined, their total number is substantial — estimates range from about $60 to $115 billion a year in the United States. In this post, we look at some recent estimates of energy efficiency spending, updating and expanding information we compiled earlier this year so that we may better understand the magnitude of these investments and where they occur. These findings provide a foundation for two subsequent posts we will publish in the next month on “Who invests in energy efficiency and why?” and “How can we increase energy efficiency investments?”

State Level Electric Energy Efficiency Potential Estimates

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This report reflects work performed under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The research focused on applying the result of EPRI’s 2014 US Energy Efficiency Potential Study which was conducted at the Census division level and developing a method to apply the division level results to the state level by customer class and by end-use.

The state allocation shows that every state has a large amount of electric energy efficiency potential that can be utilized as a cost-effective energy resource. This cost-effective electric potential grows over time as equipment reaches the end of its useful life and is replaced by a cost-effective efficient replacement. In total GWh, this energy efficiency economic potential in 2035 ranges from 901 GWh in Vermont to 87,336 GWh in Texas, reflective of the both electric loads and the types electric services in each state.

Finally, to understand the potential to bring additional technologies to market and the impact that added incentives can have on energy efficiency potential, the national model and state allocations were re-run with differing levels of incentives. These results, which vary by state, show both the direct impact of incentives as well as potential opportunities to increase energy efficiency through cost reductions.

Save Energy, Save Lives: Announcing ACEEE’s newest program, Health and Environment

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Energy efficiency doesn’t just protect indoor health; it cleans outside air by reducing pollution from fossil fuel combustion. Power plants and vehicles create pollution by burning fossil fuels, causing hospitalizations and premature deaths. Energy efficiency policies have reduced the pollution of hundreds of power plants and improved the fuel economy of tens of millions of new vehicles. Yet four out of every 10 people in the US still live where the air is unhealthy

At ACEEE we recognize that increasing energy efficiency doesn’t just save us money; it improves public health. Today ACEEE is launching a Health and Environment program with a team dedicated to helping people understand how energy efficiency affects our health–both indoors and out.

4 Technologies Driving Energy Efficiency Jobs

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When you think of energy jobs, you may first picture someone fixing a wind turbine or installing a solar panel.

These jobs are certainly on the rise. But as businesses and home owners increasingly seek cost savings on their utility bills, a large portion of energy jobs today – almost a third in fact – are focused on efficiency.

More than 133,000 energy efficiency jobs were added in 2016, bringing the total number of Americans working in the sector to 2.2 million people. More than half of those jobs (1.4 million) are in the construction industry alone. Whether it’s construction, manufacturing, or wholesale trade, much of this job growth has been driven by four technology areas.

2017 ACEEE Champion of Energy Efficiency in Industry Awards

ACEEE is proud to announce that the nomination process is open for the 2017 ACEEE Champion of Energy Efficiency Awards to be presented at the 2017 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry in Denver, Colorado, August 15 – 18, 2017.

Champion awards recognize leadership and accomplishment in the energy efficiency field. Winners will be selected based on demonstrated excellence and lasting impact. Nominees’ work may be centered in areas such as: research and development (R&D), implementation and deployment, energy policy, industrial leadership, and lifetime achievement. Thank you for taking the time to nominate outstanding individuals in the field of energy efficiency.

Nomination(s) must be received by ACEEE no later than June 9, 2017.

Cities Boost Efforts to Reduce Energy Waste: Here’s How They Rank

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As the federal government weighs budget cuts to energy efficiency programs, cities are stepping up efforts to reduce energy waste. More mayors and local lawmakers in America’s largest cities are turning to energy efficiency to reduce energy costs for consumers and businesses, strengthen the resilience of their communities, and reduce pollution, according to the third edition of the City Energy Efficiency Scorecard, released today by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.