Puerto Ricans are powering their own rooftop solar boom

Read the full story at Canary Media.

Residents and shop owners are installing solar-plus-battery systems in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Will the government get on board?

Renewable energy projects power up in tribal nations

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

From Florida to Alaska, dozens of tribes are working to harness energy from wind, sun and water to generate millions of dollars in revenue, create short- and long-term jobs and reduce utility costs for citizens, while also helping combat climate change and boost energy independence.

Solar energy is leading the way in Indian Country, with projects underway by the Navajo Nation, the Northern Cheyenne Tribe in eastern Montana, the Spokane Tribe in Washington, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and others.

Former Illinois Superfund site to be reused for solar energy

Read the full story at Waste Today.

A former hazardous waste landfill in Waukegan, Illinois, is getting a second life as a renewable energy facility after decades of mitigation efforts by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Located 42 miles north of Chicago, the Yeoman Creek Landfill has been on the federal Superfund list since its closure in the late 1960s. Cleanup to address high levels of methane and other toxic gasses is largely complete, though EPA is still monitoring the site.

While a site of this nature can come with several restrictions and regulations, BQ Energy CEO Paul Curran views it as a business opportunity. As reported by WBEZ, the New York-based company will be installing 20,000 solar panels on the Yeoman Creek site—a project that will cost roughly $10 million.

Hospitals use less fossil fuel but energy use hasn’t slipped much

Read the full story at Environment + Energy Leader.

Over the past 25 years, hospitals have decreased fossil fuel use, but electricity use isn’t declining as much. According to a survey by Grumman|Butkus Associates, the average combined Btu/ft2 (electricity plus gas/steam) for participating facilities was 236,743 in this year’s survey, up from 233,491 in 2019.

Local Clean Energy Self-Scoring Tool, Version 6.0

This updated version of ACEEE’s Local Clean Energy Self-Scoring Tool lets you score your community’s efforts to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions using the metrics from ACEEE’s 2021 City Clean Energy Scorecard.

The User Guide explains how to use the tool to evaluate community-wide initiatives, buildings policies, transportation policies, energy and water utilities, and local government operations.

Through the scoring process, you can compare your community’s clean energy efforts with median scores from the 2021 City Clean Energy Scorecard. By identifying both strengths and areas for improvement, the Self-Scoring Tool can help you create a clean energy roadmap that is designed to serve all members of your community.

New model finds best sites for electric vehicle charging stations

Read the full story from North Carolina State University.

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a computational model that can be used to determine the optimal places for locating electric vehicle (EV) charging facilities, as well as how powerful the charging stations can be without placing an undue burden on the local power grid.

Recycling renewables: A special series

As the world rolls out more solar panels, wind turbines and batteries, we’re cleaning up electricity — and generating a lot of equipment that will ultimately need to be recycled. The clean energy sector has drastically lower impacts on the environment than fossil fuels, but still needs to do its part to conserve resources and curb waste. In this week of special coverage, Canary Media reports on the technologies, policies and companies that can make clean energy even cleaner.

Articles in the series include:

Methods to evaluate the aging of photovoltaics

Read the full story at AZO Materials.

A paper recently published a paper in the journal Energies demonstrated a novel method to accurately evaluate photovoltaic (PV) module degradation rates for aging diagnosis through the on-site measurement of PV power output. 

DOE’s manufactured home efficiency rule disappoints conservation advocates, manufacturers

Read the full story at Utility Dive.

The U.S. Department of Energy on Wednesday adopted new energy efficiency standards for manufactured homes, also known as mobile homes, setting different conservation requirements for single- and multi-section structures to balance up-front affordability against long-term cost savings.

The rules, including new insulation and sealing requirements, could save residents up to $450 annually on utility bills, DOE estimated. About 17 million Americans live in manufactured homes, which are constructed off-site as opposed to traditional stick-built homes.

DOE’s new rules have been criticized by both efficiency advocates, who argue the tiered standard is too lax, and home manufacturers, who say it will drive up costs.

Webinar: Development of Battery Collection Best Practices and Labeling Feedback

Jun 30, 2022 11 am CDT
Register here.

EPA is hosting virtual feedback sessions to provide input on new Bipartisan Infrastructure Law initiatives about end-of-life battery collection and labeling. This session is for all stakeholders involved in the battery lifecycle to provide input on new battery recycling initiatives. This includes:

  • battery manufacturers;
  • battery retailers;
  • battery recyclers;
  • consumers and businesses that purchase batteries;
  • companies in the electric vehicle management chain; and
  • tribal, state, and local government agencies.

EPA is seeking feedback on:

  • What types of batteries should EPA include in the best practices for collection (e.g., small consumer batteries, electric vehicle and grid storage batteries, industrial batteries, etc.)?
  • What are the current barriers to safe and effective battery collection and recycling?
  • What practices exist to improve battery collection and recycling, especially to increase the safe recovery of critical minerals?
  • What types of communication and outreach activities are most useful to reach key battery stakeholders?
  • What existing labeling programs should EPA use to inform a new labeling program?