Category: Electronics manufacturing

New chemical safety assessment tools developed to help the electronics sector clean up its supply chains

Read the full story at Environment + Energy Leader.

Last week, green chemical solutions advocate Clean Production Action unveiled GreenScreen Certified for Cleaners & Degreasers in Manufacturing, a tool to assess chemical safety in the industrial sector.

GreenScreen Certified™ for Cleaners & Degreasers in Manufacturing launched

Clean Production Action has released GreenScreen Certified,™ for Cleaners & Degreasers in Manufacturing to promote safer chemical use and innovation in the electronics sector and beyond.

Industrial cleaners and degreasers account for some of the highest use materials in the electronics sector and are under increasing scrutiny from regulators and environmental health and safety organizations. Clean Production Action developed the new certification with Apple, a leader in safer chemistry adoption, to create clear criteria for assessing the safety of cleaners used in the electronics industry and beyond. 

For years, Apple has used GreenScreen® for Safer Chemicals to assess and promote safer chemicals in their supply chain and 100% of their supplier final assembly sites now utilize only approved safer cleaners. Today’s launch of GreenScreen Certified creates a path towards an industry-wide transformation by making information about safer alternatives readily available throughout the electronics industry.   

“These standards represent a new playbook to help companies everywhere use safer chemicals that are better for people’s health and for the planet,” said Kathleen Shaver, Apple’s director of environment and supply chain innovation. “We’re always innovating and glad to work with our partners to help drive the use of safer chemicals across industries.”

GreenScreen Certified™ for Cleaners & Degreasers in Manufacturing joins the family of GreenScreen certifications that are advancing safer chemicals in products. The criteria for GreenScreen certifications are freely and publicly available and build upon the well-established GreenScreen® for Safer Chemicals benchmark scores. Certification requirements include full ingredient disclosure, compliance with a comprehensive list of prohibited substances including per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), and testing to demonstrate the absence of priority restricted chemicals and chemical classes.

“Knowing which products are safer for workers in the electronics sector is a complicated task,” said Shari Franjevic, GreenScreen Program Manager. “GreenScreen Certified for Cleaners & Degreasers in Manufacturing now provides assurance that these products are third party certified and free of thousands of chemicals of high concern. We are very proud to supply another tool in the toolbox for safer chemistry innovation.”

For further information on the certification go to: https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/certified/cleaners-degreasers-standard

Register for the webinar November 18, 2021 at 3:00 PM EDT: https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/resources/entry/webinar-safer-cleaners-degreasers-for-electronics


About Clean Production Action

Clean Production Action is an independent, non-profit organization based in the United States. Our mission is to design and deliver strategic solutions for green chemicals, sustainable materials, and environmentally preferable products. Our core programs are: GreenScreen® for Safer Chemicals, BizNGO, Chemical Footprint Project, and Investor Environmental Health Network.

About GreenScreen® for Safer Chemicals

GreenScreen is a globally recognized tool designed to assess and benchmark chemicals based on hazard. Companies, governments, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) use GreenScreen benchmark scores to identify chemicals of concern to human health and the environment, select safer alternatives, and to track and communicate their progress. GreenScreen criteria and guidance are fully transparent and available for anyone to use.

About GreenScreen Certified™

Built upon GreenScreen® for Safer Chemicals, GreenScreen Certified™ is an independent, non-profit certification that promotes the use of inherently safer chemicals in products and manufacturing.

The computer chip industry has a dirty climate secret

Read the full story from The Guardian.

The semiconductor industry has a problem. Demand is booming for silicon chips, which are embedded in everything from smartphones and televisions to wind turbines, but it comes at a big cost: a huge carbon footprint.

DOE announces $54 million to increase energy efficiency in microelectronics technologies

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced nearly $54 million for 10 new projects led by DOE’s National Laboratories to increase energy efficiency in microelectronics design and production. Microelectronics are critical to nearly all modern technology, including smartphones, medical equipment, power plant and electricity grids, and automobiles. Advanced microelectronics hold the potential to power innovative solutions to challenges in clean energy, climate, and national security. 

“Thanks to microelectronics, technologies that used to swallow entire buildings now fit in the palms of our hands — and now they are supporting climate solutions in electricity, transportation, and renewable energy. DOE’s world-class scientists are stepping up to reduce the carbon footprint of micro technologies used by billions of people around the world to secure our clean energy future, increase American competitiveness, and lead on climate action and innovation.” 

Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm.

Miniaturization of microelectronic devices has spawned a digital revolution in recent decades, resulting in smaller and more powerful devices, like phones and computers, which has improved convenience and advanced scientific advancement and innovation. That continual shrinking, commonly known as Moore’s Law, is now facing technological and economic obstacles. As devices have shrunk in size, the energy required for their production has not been reduced at the same pace. Significant investments in R&D are now required to increase energy efficiency and create more sustainable technology systems that can carry the field into the future.    

The projects, led by diverse groups of researchers at DOE National Labs and experts in academia and industry, will aim to increase energy efficiency and functionality while stimulating US-based innovation as the foundation for future domestic technology development and manufacturing. These projects are “co-design” microelectronics projects, involving multi-disciplinary collaboration that takes into account the interdependencies among materials, physics, architectures, and software.  

Projects will explore

  • New computing architectures based on human brain design 
  • Ultra-low power electronics 
  • Low-temperature, nanoscale, and quantum sensors 

Projects were chosen based on peer review under the DOE National Laboratory Announcement “Microelectronics Co-Design Research.” Total funding is $54 million for projects lasting up to three years, with $18 million in Fiscal Year 2021 dollars and outyear funding contingent on congressional appropriations. A list of awards can be found here.

Electronics industry leaders advance toward zero exposure to workers throughout the supply chain

Read the full story from the Clean Electronics Production Network.

The Clean Electronics Production Network is pleased to announce the Toward Zero Exposure program, which has been developed with noted sustainability and social responsibility leaders. As Founding Signatories, Apple, Dell Technologies and HP Inc., commit to accelerating existing efforts in chemical safety and boosting awareness of the need to improve chemical management practices across the global electronics manufacturing industry to eliminate workers’ exposure to hazardous chemicals.

What’s the buzz? Magnetic properties for more energy-efficient computer chips

Read the full story at Centered.

Magnetostriction is a property of magnetic materials that causes fluorescent lights and electrical transformers to buzz. This property causes the materials to change shape or dimensions as the magnetic field changes. 

Magnetostriction also plays a big part in a new material that could lead to more energy-efficient computing. The research team that developed the material is led by the University of Michigan, and researchers from the University of Wisconsin and Purdue University also are participating.

The new material is twice as magnetostrictive and much cheaper than similar materials. It could contribute to magnetostrictive chips, which would cut the energy consumption of a wide range of electronics from cell phones to huge data centers.

New conductive polymer ink opens for next-generation printed electronics

Read the full story from Linköping University.

Researchers have developed a stable high-conductivity polymer ink. The advance paves the way for innovative printed electronics with high energy efficiency.

Purdue to co-lead U.S. Department of Defense-funded project to advance adoption of lead-free electronics

Read the full story from Purdue University.

A new consortium funded by an award from the U.S. Department of Defense has selected Purdue University to co-lead its first project aimed at advancing the adoption of lead-free electronics in defense systems.

The Defense Electronics Consortium (DEC), to be established and managed by the U.S. Partnership for Assured Electronics (USPAE), is designed to address the defense risks created by the contraction of the U.S. electronics manufacturing sector over the last 20 years.

Purdue, the University of Maryland and Auburn University will lead the consortium’s Lead-Free Defense Electronics Project, which has received $40 million to be distributed over a period of five to seven years. Of the $3.9 million in funds for the first year of the project, approximately $1 million has been awarded to researchers at Purdue’s West Lafayette and Northwest campuses.

The project’s goal is to foster research and action to accelerate the transition to lead-free electronics in aerospace, defense and other high-performance electronics. Consumer and automotive electronics have been transitioning to lead-free technologies since 2006 when the European Union banned the sale of lead-containing electronics. Japan, India and China followed suit with similar bans.

Tackiling ‘shoddy’ electronics can significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Read the full story in Resource.

A new report produced by Green Alliance highlights the potential to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions by tackling the sale of electronics that do not meet ecodesign standards.

Design for a circular economy looks at the composition of the estimated 727,000 tonnes of e-waste that is not recycled in the UK each year. The report cites data that Britons each generate 23.9 kg of e-waste a year, the second largest amount in the world.

A Fishy Solution To Sustainable Wearable Tech

Read the full story at Asian Scientist.

Films derived from fish scales could represent a promising alternative for more sustainable flexible electronics, including wearables and folding displays.

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