Category: Data science

After a Trump-length pause, the EPA is relaunching a major climate change report

Read the full story at Grist.

Drawing on data from 50 government agencies, the EPA has published 54 indicators of global warming.

New DNRC web app provides access to Montana surface water data

Read the full story from the Whitehall Ledger.

A new web application from the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) puts real-time streamflow data at the fingertips of boaters, anglers, water management professionals, and the general public.

UMass Amherst Political Economy Research Institute launches new tool to track air pollution at every U.S. school

Read the full story from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) today unveiled a new interactive, web-based tool for tracking industrial toxic air pollution at every school in the United States. The tool, Air Toxics at School, reports toxicity-weighted concentrations of pollutants to show individual chronic human health risk from industrial toxic air pollutants at the schools’ locations.

NOAA Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaign

The National Integrated Heat Health Information Center (NIHHIC), a partnership between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, is an integrated system that:

  • builds understanding of the problem of extreme heat,
  • defines demand for climate services that enhance societal resilience,
  • develops science-based products and services from a sustained climate science research program, and
  • improves capacity, communication, and societal understanding of the problem in order to reduce morbidity and mortality due to extreme heat. 

One of NIHHIC’s projects is urban heat island mapping. These maps and their underlying data are available on the NIHHIC website.

Online map showcases construction-related careers in booming green sector

Read the full story at Utility Dive.

A group of energy-efficiency organizations has launched an online tool designed to help U.S. workers research career paths in the booming field of green building.

The interactive Green Buildings Career Map highlights career opportunities in building energy efficiency, with 55 jobs across four industry sectors, as well as over 300 potential advancement routes. It was developed with input from industry subject matter experts to help interested candidates learn about quality jobs related to energy efficiency in buildings.

The initiative, supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, was designed to foster a robust and inclusive pipeline of qualified workers to meet employer demand, said Larry Sherwood, CEO of the Interstate Renewable Energy Council, one of its developers. “This is crucially important to sustaining the rapid growth of this important industry and ensuring the benefits of employment in this sector are accessible to more people,” he said in a release.

New U.S. Carbon Monitor website compares emissions among the 50 states

Read the full story from the University of California-Irvine.

Following last year’s successful launch of a global carbon monitor website to track and display greenhouse gas emissions from a variety of sources, an international team led by Earth system scientists from the University of California, Irvine is unveiling this week a new data resource focused on the United States.

Near real-time, state-level emissions estimates are now available at the U.S. Carbon Monitor website to serve the academic community, policy makers, the news media and the general public. As a companion to launch of the public website, the team today also released an explanatory paper on the EarthArXiv preprint server.

IMF Launches Climate Change Indicators Dashboard

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has launched a new Climate Change Indicators Dashboard—an international statistical initiative to address the growing need for data in macroeconomic and financial policy analysis to facilitate climate change mitigation and adaptation.

The Dashboard is a single platform that brings together experimental climate change indicators that allows comparison across countries. The indicators have been developed in cooperation with international organizations and other agencies including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the World Bank Group (WBG), the United Nations (UN), the European Commission, the European Statistical Office (Eurostat), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The indicators presented are the result of estimates from IMF staff and other publicly available data sources.

The selection and development of the experimental indicators are driven by the IMF’s need for member countries surveillance, monitoring, policy making, and research. The Dashboard covers greenhouse gas emissions from economic activity, trade in environmental goods, green finance, government policies, and physical and transition risks.

“To develop the right measures to tackle climate change, governments need robust and comparable data. The new IMF Dashboard will help fill data gaps, so policymakers can undertake the macroeconomic and financial analysis that underpins effective policies,” IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva said.

The indicators are grouped into 4 categories: Economic Activity and ClimateCross-BorderFinancial, Physical and Transition Risks; and Government Policy indicators. The four categories broadly reflect four dimensions: production, consumption and final demand, financing, and government policies. Additional indicators, country coverage and granularity are planned to be added over time.

Offshore Wind Data Release Propels Wind Prospecting

Read the full story from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

At first glance, today’s atmospheric scientists and mining prospectors of the past seem quite different. Look closer and you will find some striking similarities. Notably, a willingness to sift through volumes of information to dig up resource nuggets worth their weight in gold.

Unlike the past, however, today’s wind resource prospectors share their findings with the world. Using state-of-the-art modeling tools and sophisticated resource assessment technologies, the Wind Resource Characterization team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) makes available new offshore wind data sets.

“Existing offshore wind data are largely outdated, lacking precise, real-world observations,” said NREL researcher Mike Optis, who is leading efforts to update publicly available offshore wind data. “Our goal is to provide more accurate data sets to the public that can improve offshore wind plant site selection, design, and operational decisions.” 

Energy policy Simulator

The Energy Policy Simulator (EPS) is an open-source model for estimating the environmental, economic, and human health impacts of hundreds of climate and energy policies. EPS offers unparalleled accessibility to the model through an easy-to-use web interface that allows non-technical users to model their own policy scenarios. In partnership with Energy Innovation, RMI is developing state-level versions of the EPS to make robust modeling tools and insights freely available to a diverse group of stakeholders including advocates, policymakers, and researchers.

In each state where the EPS becomes available, RMI and Energy Innovation publish insights and conduct stakeholder engagement to support use of the tool and drive focus on the highest impact policies that can bring emissions down in line with limiting atmospheric warming to 1.5°C. To date, the EPS is available in five states.

Read more about the Rocky Mountain Institute’s State Policy Analysis and Modeling initiative.

This clever app turns your spreadsheets into slick interactive web tools

Read the full story at Fast Company.

Grid gives new life to Excel and Google Sheets, without making you give up the apps you know. It even has the support of one of the spreadsheet’s inventors.

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