Category: Libraries

Salt Lake City librarian cares for library’s bees in backyard during rooftop renovations

Read the full story in the Salt Lake Tribune.

Amber Lawvor is taking the Beehive State to heart — and home.

Five ways librarians teach science literacy

Read the full post at Elsevier Connect.

It wasn’t until Kristina Hopkins was in her second year of graduate school at Columbia University in the US that she discovered the databases and tools available to support researchers in their work.

Sandia creates global archive of historical renewable energy documents

Read the full story from Sandia National Laboratories.

Sandia’s solar researchers and librarians have spent the past few years collecting, digitizing and cataloging a host of reports, memos, blueprints, photos and more on concentrating solar power, a kind of renewable energy produced by using large mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto a receiver on a tower to generate electricity. These historical research documents are now in a publicly accessible digital archive for other concentrating solar power researchers, historians, corporations and citizens to view.

USDA Community Facilities Direct Loan & Grant Program

This program provides affordable funding to develop essential community facilities in rural areas. An essential community facility is defined as a facility that provides an essential service to the local community for the orderly development of the community in a primarily rural area.

What does this program do?
This program provides affordable funding to develop essential community facilities in rural areas. An essential community facility is defined as a facility that provides an essential service to the local community for the orderly development of the community in a primarily rural area, and does not include private, commercial or business undertakings.

What is an eligible area?
Rural areas including cities, villages, townships, and towns including Federally Recognized Tribal Lands with no more than 20,000 residents according to the latest U.S. Census Data are eligible for this program.

How may funds be used?
Funds can be used to purchase, construct, and / or improve essential community facilities, purchase equipment and pay related project expenses.

What are the funding priorities?
Priority point system based on population, median household income

  • Small communities with a population of 5,500 or less
  • Low-income communities having a median household income below 80% of the state nonmetropolitan median household income

To learn more and to apply, visit the Community Facilities Direct Loan & Grant Program webpage

Library offers food for thought, and for butterflies

Read the full story from the Oak Park Public Library.

At the request of the local environmental club, Earth Action Team, the Oak Park Village Board passed a proclamation Feb. 8 declaring 2021 the “year of the butterfly” to inspire the community to create healthy habitats for monarchs.

The Oak Park Public Library (OPPL) has joined the effort by planting two pollinator gardens on library premises to support monarch butterflies, whose numbers have decreased dramatically in recent years. 

Sculptures that make novel use of books – in pictures

Read the full story at The Guardian.

As a child in Baltimore, graphic designer Stephen Doyle had a babysitter who read newspapers horizontally – across, not down, the columns – to create new meaning. The word play inspired his adult hobby of making book sculptures. “I started the series when ‘hypertext’ was a novel internet term. Linking one text to another seemed rather dada,” says Doyle. “I wondered what it would look like if a book’s lines connected to others elsewhere in the pages.” He’s since made sculptures for publications including the New Yorker and Wired.

Climate Change Library Lab

The Climate Change Library Lab provides information and advice specific to libraries to help them prepare for climate-related disasters or deal with post-disaster recovery within their communities. It includes links to books, videos, articles, and case studies, as well as information about environmental justice and climate literacy.

Why more public libraries are doubling as food distribution hubs

The Los Angeles Regional Food Bank held a distribution event at the LA county library’s headquarters on Jan. 22, 2021. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images

by Noah Lenstra (University of North Carolina – Greensboro)

In the summer of 2021, public libraries everywhere, from Idaho and Oklahoma to Tennessee and Arizona, will offer free meals to families with children in their local communities.

What might look like a new role for libraries builds on their long tradition of serving as innovation spaces, community centers and sanctuaries for people who are homeless or mentally ill.

I’ve been researching how public libraries address food insecurity – what happens when households can’t acquire adequate food because they can’t afford it or can’t access it for other reasons. Across the board, these efforts emerge from community partnerships with organizations that include school districts and food banks.

As Kristin Warzocha, president of the Greater Cleveland Food Bank, explained in 2016, “We have the food, and they have the patrons who need it.”

Libraries have been fighting food insecurity for years.

Lunch at the library

The earliest example of this kind I’ve found dates back 35 years. In 1986, the Nelsonville branch of the Athens County Public Library in southeastern Ohio began serving federally funded lunches in the summertime to children to ensure that they don’t go hungry.

That county has one of Ohio’s highest food-insecurity rates, which helps explain why librarians there sought to provide food access in tandem with summer learning activities.

By 2019, over 2,000 U.S. public libraries – about 1 in 10 – served summer meals.

This practice has largely remained below the radar. The official magazine of the American Library Association didn’t mention this trend until 2008. Since then, though, growing state and national recognition and support has begun to emerge.

The COVID-19 pandemic

When the coronavirus pandemic got underway, public libraries and their staff continued to fight food insecurity, even when their doors were closed.

Some library workers were reassigned to food banks to help process and distribute donations. Others worked with food banks to hand out grab-and-go meals in library parking lots.

Still others established emergency food pantries at libraries.

In St. Louis, the county public library system took part in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farmers to Families program. Libraries everywhere, from Kentucky and Vermont to California and Georgia, participated in the emergency national food distribution program too.

Many libraries have started to host small food pantries located outdoors, in little boxes with doors. These sharing boxes are modeled on the “little free library” movement. These micro-libraries are usually simple cabinets fastened to posts and stocked with books anyone passing by can take for free. The little free pantry movement, which began in 2016 and seems to have expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic, instead seeks to dispatch food to those in need.

In 2021, by the middle of May, at least 491 libraries in 28 states had made plans to serve meals to schoolchildren during their summer vacations. This number is only preliminary and will rise once more states report their data to the USDA.

Noah Lenstra, Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Brown County, Indiana library considering switching to solar energy

Read the full story in the Brown County Democrat.

The Brown County Public Library is exploring the possibility of erecting an array of solar panels in the median of the library’s lower parking lot in an effort to take advantage of utility incentives and renewable energy technologies, and to cut electricity expenses by up to 98 percent.

Meet the activist archivists saving the Internet from the digital dustbin

Read the full story in Discover Magazine.

Websites die constantly. The sheer size of the internet makes it feel like a permanent fixture, but individual pages only live an estimated 90 days before they change or vanish. At the same time, every single page has potential historical value. Maybe a future scholar will want to read a local news article that disappeared when the paper redesigned its website, or a political candidate is purging troublesome old statements. Perhaps someone will just want to revisit a video that made them laugh decades ago.

That anything (and everything) might someday prove valuable is why extensive internet archiving efforts exist. Those include the aptly named Internet Archive, a non-profit digital library that launched in 1996 with the humble mission of providing “universal access to all knowledge.” They’ve since digitized millions of books, videos, audio recordings, and software programs, while their Wayback Machine has saved snapshots of an estimated 544 billion webpages. Here, for example, is what the front page of Discover looked like on June 14, 2007.

The Wayback Machine is an incredible bulwark against websites that die slow deaths wrought from neglect, technological changes, mergers, and other ravages of time. But some websites have their plugs abruptly pulled, and that’s where the Archive Team steps in.

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