‘This is a holistic approach’: Danone unveils details behind its industry-first methane reduction program

Read the full story at Dairy Reporter.

The dairy giant’s director of sustainability spoke of the ‘important precedent’ its initiative has set – and how it’s planning to enact it.

Spotlight on 2022’s Product Winner: ADEQ

Read the full story in Environment + Energy Leader.

As a result of the Pandemic, ADEQ developed and launched a new telecommute emissions reduction calculator that allows employers to estimate how telecommuting programs reduce pollutants that contribute to regional air quality problems. Developed with community/local business input, the calculator was included as an upgrade to a regional transportation demand management platform and includes the following innovative features: Telework emissions reductions calculations for regionally specific pollutants (NOx, VOC and PM10) to show how telework prevents air pollution — the first program in the region to share such detail. Easy to understand, presentation-ready emissions reduction totals are translated into equivalencies for more widely understood activities (e.g., decommissioning leaf blowers), and plug-and-play telework emissions reduction tables simplify employer sustainability reports.

Building A Clean Energy Economy: A Guidebook to the Inflation Reduction Act’s Investments In Clean Energy And Climate Action

Download the guide.

This guidebook provides an overview of the clean energy, climate mitigation and resilience, agriculture, and conservation-related tax incentives and investment programs in President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act, including who is eligible to apply for funding and for what activities. The Biden-Harris Administration is working quickly to design, develop, and implement these programs; as such, the information in this guidebook is current as of publication. In the coming weeks and months, we will publish new developments on www.CleanEnergy.gov to keep stakeholders and potential beneficiaries of these programs up to date on the latest deadlines and details. This guidebook does not cover the Inflation Reduction Act’s health care provisions or certain corporate tax reforms.

The guidebook groups the Inflation Reduction Act’s tax incentives and investment programs into thematic chapters and explains how the law will deliver on the President’s commitments to the American people. Each chapter outlines the significance of these programs and includes a one-page summary of each program’s eligible uses, potential beneficiaries, and other important information. Given the cross-cutting nature of energy and climate issues, many of these Inflation Reduction Act programs and tax provisions could fall under more than one chapter. For ease of presentation, each program or provision is featured only once in the guidebook. 

Significant reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions still possible

Read the full story from McGill University.

About a quarter of the world’s electricity currently comes from power plants fired by natural gas. These contribute significantly to global greenhouse gas emissions (amounting to 10% of energy-related emissions according to the most recent figures from 2017) and climate change. By gathering data from 108 countries around the world and quantifying the emissions by country, a team has estimated that total global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the life cycle of gas-fired power is 3.6 billion tonnes each year. They found that this amount could be reduced by as much as 71% if a variety of mitigation options were used around the world.

EPA seeks input on decarbonizing construction materials and products

On January 19, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the first opportunities for public input on new programs focused on lower carbon construction materials made possible by a $350 million investment from President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act. The Agency will hold three public webinars and will accept written feedback on establishing new grant and technical assistance programs, and a carbon labeling program for construction materials with substantially lower levels of embodied greenhouse gas emissions.

EPA’s new programs will provide grants, technical assistance, and tools to help states and Tribal Nations, manufacturers, institutional buyers, real estate developers, builders, and others measure, report, and substantially lower the levels of embodied carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production, use, and disposal of construction materials and products. These new programs, funded by the Inflation Reduction Act, will build upon EPA’s work in the ENERGY STAR Industrial Program and the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program, among others, to protect human health and the planet.

EPA will hold three public engagement webinars to solicit feedback from experts and stakeholders, including institutional buyers, developers, builders, manufacturers, and representatives from states, Tribal Nations, non-profit organizations, trade associations, and others.

  • March 2, 2023, 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. EST: Reducing Embodied Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Construction Materials Prioritization and Environmental Data Improvement – This webinar will ask for feedback on how to prioritize construction materials and products and how to improve data on embodied greenhouse gas emissions through measurement, standardization, transparency and reporting criteria. Register here.
  • March 22, 2023, 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. EST: Reducing Embodied Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Grants and Technical Assistance for Environmental Product Declarations – This webinar will ask for feedback on new grant and technical assistance programs to help businesses calculate and report the greenhouse gas emissions data for construction materials and products through Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs). Register here.
  • April 19, 2023, 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. EST: Reducing Embodied Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Carbon Labeling – This webinar will ask for feedback on how EPA could develop a carbon labeling program for construction materials and products with substantially lower embodied greenhouse gas emissions. Register here.

In addition, EPA will issue a Request for Information to solicit written comments on the design of these new programs. Upon publication of the Federal Register notice, comments on any of the questions outlined should be submitted to docket EPA-HQ-OPPT-2022-0924 on Regulations.gov by May 1, 2023. The Agency also published an interim determination under Inflation Reduction Act Sections 60503 and 60506 that was provided in December 2022 to the Department of Transportation and the General Services Administration on their Inflation Reduction Act funded procurement of construction materials and products with substantially lower embodied greenhouse gas emissions.

EPA will use the public input received during the webinars and in writing to guide the development and implementation of its programs.

These actions support President Biden’s Buy Clean Initiative, which leverages the Federal Government’s power as the largest purchaser in the world to advance low-carbon construction materials across its procurement and funded infrastructure projects.

Learn more about these new programs funded by the Inflation Reduction Act.

Background

In August 2022, Congress passed, and President Biden signed, the Inflation Reduction Act into law, creating the largest investment to combat the climate crisis in U.S. history. The Inflation Reduction Act will bolster U.S. energy security, help families save money on energy costs and prescription drugs, reduce the deficit, and create good-paying jobs. EPA received $41.5 billion in appropriations to develop and support 24 new and existing programs that monitor and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, protect health and advance environmental justice.

2023 Net Zero Report: Decarbonization Momentum Falters with Corporate Implementation Challenges

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The collective experience of the 505 organizational leaders in our 2023 Net Zero Report drills down on the most significant implementation barriers organizations are facing, and the approaches they are taking to overcome these challenges. We find that now more than ever it is vital for organizations to double-down on their decarbonization investments and to use the levers at their disposal to accelerate their impact.

The U.S. National Blueprint for Transportation Decarbonization: A Joint Strategy to Transform Transportation

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The U.S. National Blueprint for Transportation Decarbonization is a first-of-its-kind strategy for federal leadership
and partnerships to decarbonize the entire U.S. transportation sector. Decarbonizing the transportation sector will
require multiple strategies and resources to deliver safe, effective, affordable, and sustainable solutions to existing
and emerging challenges.

Washington state just started capping carbon emissions. Here’s how it works.

Read the full story at Grist.

Washington state rang in the New Year with the launch of its most ambitious plan to slash carbon pollution. The new “cap-and-invest” program is designed to follow in the footsteps of California, where a cap-and-trade system began in 2013, while trying to learn from its missteps.

Signed into law by Washington Governor Jay Inslee in 2021, the Climate Commitment Act works by setting a statewide “cap” on greenhouse gas emissions that steadily lowers over time. Washington, like California, is establishing a market for businesses to buy pollution “allowances” that will become increasingly expensive — an incentive to cut emissions and a way to raise money to counter climate change.

The first auction to sell off these allowances is scheduled at the end of February, and if all goes according to plan, Washington’s emissions will drop to 95 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, an even steeper cut than California’s, which aims for an 80 percent reduction by the same year.

NASA satellite used to monitor methane from landfill sites

Read the full story at E&T.

Observations from a NASA satellite will be used by nonprofit group Carbon Mapper to discover the landfill sites responsible for emitting the most methane.

White House releases climate guidance for permitting

Read the full story from E&E News.

The White House issued a new policy directive Friday that aims to spur clean energy development and fulfill President Joe Biden’s pledge to strengthen the green economy.

The greenhouse gas guidance directs federal planners to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions “to the greatest extent possible” when surveying the impacts of projects like highways, pipelines, transmissions, bridges and renewable energy ventures. The documents builds on an Obama-era edict that former President Donald Trump scrapped.