Climate mitigation set to help air pollution

Read the full story at Environmentalresearchweb.

Reigning in both climate change and air pollution is crucial if we are to maintain the planet as a healthy and comfortable environment for humans. But how well do the separate policies for these issues work together? A team from Europe, the US and Japan has investigated.

A huge Antarctic glacier just lost another chunk of ice — and we know because of NASA

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

One of Antarctica’s most rapidly melting glaciers has shed yet another large block of ice in an event that NASA scientists say is “further evidence of the ice shelf’s fragility.” The agency drew attention to the incident in a tweet Wednesday morning.

How the Waste Industry Can Lead on Climate Change

Read the full story at Waste360.

Our inefficiencies in tackling global climate change stem partly from a problem of timing. As a species, we’re predisposed to buy now and pay later, which doesn’t lend itself to long-term problem solving. We measure the impacts of carbon dioxide over centuries while our politics run on four-year cycles.

But our luck may be changing for the better: New science shows our inclination toward short-term actions could actually be a hidden strength because not all greenhouse gas emissions are created equal—some are fast and furious in their impacts while others are slow but steady. Our industry is poised to be front and center in the new short-term climate revolution.

Environmental Groups Say California’s Climate Program Has Not Helped Them

Read the full story from NPR.

In the Wilmington neighborhood of Los Angeles, residential streets dead end at oil refineries. Diesel trucks crawl through, carrying containers from nearby ports. Longtime resident Magali Sanchez Hall says the pollution from all that has taken a toll, right on the street where she lives.

“The people that live here, the mother died of cancer,” she says, pointing to a modest one-story home. “The people that live here, three people died of cancer.”

The state’s own research finds people in Wilmington are about twice as likely to get cancer as the average person in greater Los Angeles. That’s mostly due to diesel fumes, but also the toxic chemicals that mix with the greenhouse gas emissions of refineries.

Sanchez Hall wipes her finger across the hood of a car and holds it up. “Black dust,” she says.

Given all this, you might think Sanchez Hall would be excited about California’s so-called cap-and-trade program, which aims to get polluting companies, like the refineries here, to reduce emissions. But she and others say the state’s signature climate change program is failing them.

How untreated water is making our kids sick: FSU researcher explores possible climate change link

Read the full story from Florida State University.

A Florida State University researcher has drawn a link between the impact of climate change and untreated drinking water on the rate of gastrointestinal illness in children.

Assistant Professor of Geography Chris Uejio has published a first-of-its-kind study, “Drinking-water treatment, climate change, and childhood gastrointestinal illness projections for northern Wisconsin (USA) communities drinking untreated groundwater,” in the Hydrogeology Journal. The study explores the benefits of additional drinking water treatment compared to the risks created by climate change. 

In Vancouver, a Climate Program That’s All About the Neighbors

Read the full story at CityLab.

For all the work that goes into building climate action plans, cities often run up against one problem: Many well-meaning residents are stuck in the same old habits, unsure of how to make meaningful change.

In Vancouver, the solution is starting small. About two and a half years ago, some residents in the Riley Park neighborhood wanted to put the city’s Greenest City Action Plan to work in their community. With support from Evergreen and a grant from the city, they created the Green Bloc initiative and set an ambitious goal: to decrease the carbon footprint of participating households by 25 percent.