Category: Reuse

A big win for right-to-repair

Read the full story at Grist.

President Joe Biden signed an executive order directing the Federal Trade Commission to tackle at repair monopolies.

Biden signs executive order targeting right to repair, ISPs, net neutrality, and more

Read the full story at The Verge.

President Joe Biden has signed an executive order meant to promote competition — with technology directly in the crosshairs.

The order, which the White House outlined earlier this morning, calls on US agencies like the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to implement 72 specific provisions. The topics include restoring net neutrality provisions repealed during the prior administration, codifying “right to repair” rules, and increasing scrutiny of tech monopolies.

The comeback of reuse and the path forward

Read the full story from Closed Loop Partners.

Many feared that the COVID-19 pandemic would push climate and sustainability priorities to the backburner, but the opposite proved true. Setbacks on the use of reusable bags and cups were only temporary as the world adjusted, and overall we witnessed an increase in popularity of reusable packaging solutions that alleviate the waste associated with single-use packaging.

Consumer demand, behavior changes brought on by the pandemic, regulatory shifts, technological developments, the strong business case for resource efficiency and the need to protect our environment are all driving the growth of modern reuse models.

As cities, towns and states across the U.S. start to reopen, and with Starbucks’ recent announcement that personal reusable cups will be accepted once more (on June 22), it’s critical that we examine the potential of these models, why they’re growing and how to remove any potential roadblocks in their pathway to scale. 

The Reusies

UPSTREAM and Closed Loop Partners are launching the first ever virtual awards show for the Reuse Movement in the U.S. in 2021.

This inaugural event celebrates the pioneers, the trailblazers, the innovators and game-changing heroes who are developing a better way than throw-away, advancing systemic change and co-creating a world where we can get what we need and want without all the waste.

The Call for Nominations is open until July 11.

Gear-lending ‘library’ opens door to new generation of outdoor adventurers

Read the full story in the Durango Herald.

Vanessa Saldivar was 5 when her father hiked her up the bunny slope at Mt. Hood Skibowl in Oregon. She didn’t have a fancy jacket. She used socks as mittens. Her dad gave her a nudge. And she was hooked.

“All these barriers just broke down in that moment,” said the new executive director of Get Outdoors Leadville!, which last week opened a new gear library that lends outdoor equipment to Lake County residents. “The gear library is addressing those barriers. How big of a difference would this have made in my community growing up? I could have had gloves!”

Five years after the Get Outdoors Leadville! – or GOL – coalition secured $3 million from Great Outdoors Colorado’s Generation Wild initiative, the long-planned gear cache is opening its own facility on the Colorado Mountain College campus.

Right to repair is on the way

Read the full story at Green Biz.

Beyond enshrining consumer rights, the right to repair could combat planned obsolescence and a throwaway culture that has turned e-waste into the fastest growing waste stream around the globe.

The ‘Buy Nothing Project’ Began as a Social Experiment. Now It’s a Global Movement.

Read the full story at Treehugger.

If you dream of a world where neighbors share with each other and you don’t have to spend money at a store every time you need something, then your local Buy Nothing Group might be the perfect fit. This clever idea began in July 2013, when two friends, Rebecca Rockefeller and Liesl Clark, from Bainbridge Island, Washington, wanted to try something new. They liked the idea of developing a hyper-local gift economy as a way to challenge the consumerist mindset and reconnect neighbors. The Buy Nothing Project has grown rapidly since then, with 6,000 groups now in 44 countries. 

The basic idea is that anyone can ask for what they need and anyone can give it. The official rules are simple: “Post anything you’d like to give away, lend, or share amongst neighbors. Ask for anything you’d like to receive for free or borrow. Keep it legal. No hate speech. No buying or selling, no trades or bartering, we’re strictly a gift economy.” 

5 Inspiring Examples of Zero Waste Gardening

Read the full post at Treehugger.

These case studies show how clever reuse and upcycling can lead to significantly reduced waste.

Artist’s Lace-Like Paper Cut Artworks Are Made With Recycled Newspapers

Read the full story at Treehugger.

These ephemeral, woven paper artworks are inspired by a convergence of traditional handicrafts and the urgency of current affairs.

Plant yourself a great home garden with the Urbana Free Library’s Seed Library

If you live in the Champaign-Urbana area and want to improve your home garden, you can borrow seeds from the Urbana Free Library’s Seed Library.

A seed library is a place where you can “check out” seeds and bring back new seeds from your harvest. You take seeds from the lending library, plant them, grow the plants, let some go to seed, and then return some of these next-generation seeds for others to borrow. They also accept store bought seeds.

For more information, including a list of currently available seeds and instructions for “returning” or donating seeds, visit the Library’s web site.

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