Positioning the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Region as a Leader in the Voluntary Carbon Offset Market

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The conclusion of this report is that the region has many possibilities to supply both nature-based and engineered carbon projects into the voluntary carbon offset markets (VCMs). 52 gigatonnes (gtons) of at-scale, environmentally sound, high quality additional, durable, and unclaimed) carbon dioxide storage is available in the Great Lakes region by 2050 with a revenue potential
of at least $783B USD.

New system creates bioplastics, consumes CO2

Read the full story from Washington University in St. Louis.

A team of researchers has developed a system that uses carbon dioxide, CO2, to produce biodegradable plastics, or bioplastics, that could replace the nondegradable plastics used today. The research addresses two challenges: the accumulation of nondegradable plastics and the remediation of greenhouse gas emissions. The work was published in the Sept. 28 edition of the journal Chem.

Efficient carbon dioxide reduction under visible light with a novel, inexpensive catalyst

Read the full story from the Tokyo Institute of Technology.

A novel coordination polymer-based photocatalyst for CO2 reduction exhibits unprecedented performance, giving scientists new hope in the fight against global warming. Made from abundant elements and requiring no complex post-synthesis treatment or modifications, this promising photocatalyst could pave the way for a new class of photocatalysts for efficiently converting CO2 into useful chemicals.

Implementing CO2 capture and utilization at scale and speed: The path to achieving its potential

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CO2 capture and utilization (CCU) is an essential tool in the global carbon management toolkit. CCU can contribute to gigaton-scale removal of CO2 from the atmosphere and can serve as a source of carbon for many essential products made with carbon. It is important to understand, however, that effectively using CCU to help meet our climate goals means that we need to build an entirely new industry coupling carbon capture with carbon utilization. This report assesses the state of the emerging industry, identifies key actions that are needed, and projects market share for key products up to 2050 for a range of scenarios.

LanzaTech and Brookfield form strategic partnership with an initial $500 million commitment

Read the full story at Waste360.

LanzaTech NZ, Inc. (“LanzaTech”), an innovative Carbon Capture and Transformation (“CCT”) company that transforms waste carbon into materials such as sustainable fuels, fabrics, packaging, and other products that people use in their daily lives, announces today a funding partnership with Brookfield Renewable, and its institutional partners, to co-develop and build new commercial-scale production plants that will employ LanzaTech’s CCT technology, which transforms captured carbon into valuable raw material commodities.

Texas A&M AgriLife designs system to create bioplastics

Read the full story from Texas A&M.

A team of Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists has developed a system that uses carbon dioxide, CO2, to produce biodegradable plastics, or bioplastics, that could replace the nondegradable plastics used today. The research addresses two challenges: the accumulation of nondegradable plastics and the remediation of greenhouse gas emissions.

Published Sept. 28 in Chem, the research was a collaboration of Susie Dai, Ph.D., associate professor in the Texas A&M Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, and Joshua Yuan, Ph.D., formerly with the Texas A&M Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology as chair for synthetic biology and renewable products and now Lopata professor and chair in the Washington University in St. Louis Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering.

Legal and Regulatory Frameworks for CCUS

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Carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) technologies are set to play an important role in putting the global energy system on a path to net zero. Successfully deploying CCUS relies on the establishment of legal and regulatory frameworks to ensure the effective stewardship of CCUS activities and the safe and secure storage of CO2.

Several countries have already developed comprehensive legal and regulatory frameworks for CCUS. These form a valuable knowledge base for the growing number of countries that have identified a role for CCUS in meeting their climate goals, but which are yet to establish a legal foundation for CCUS, and particularly for CO2 storage. Increasingly, existing frameworks are also being tested as more commercial CCUS projects are developed, with important learnings for regulators.  

This IEA CCUS Handbook is a resource for policy makers and regulators on establishing and updating legal and regulatory frameworks for CCUS. It identifies 25 priority issues that frameworks should address for CCUS deployment, presenting global case studies and examining how different jurisdictions have approached these issues. The handbook is supported by a web-based legal and regulatory database, and model legislative text that is found at the end of this report.

See also: CCUS legal and regulatory database, which provides examples of legislative approaches to CCUS from around the world. It is organized by priority issues impacting CCUS activities – such as permitting and authorization or long-term liability – across various regions, countries and states/ provinces. Where applicable, the base legislation from which the relevant law or regulation is derived is referenced and linked.

Using CO2 to create carbon-negative chemicals

Read the full story at Azo Cleantech.

AZoCleantech speaks to Dr. Melis Duyar from the University of Surrey about their contribution to clean technology research. Duyar has worked with her team to develop materials and processes to capture carbon dioxide, perform a chemical transformation of the captured carbon dioxide with hydrogen, and release the final product, which would be a carbon negative chemical.

ISTC leads extensive portfolio of carbon capture projects

ISTC engineer Stephanie Brownstein gestures toward equipment for the biphasic solvent carbon capture project at Abbott Power Plant while speaking to visitors from the Department of Energy and Doosan Corporation. Photo by Travis Tate, U of I Facilities & Services.

by Trish Barker, Prairie Research Institute

Visitors from the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) recently toured multiple carbon capture projects led by the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC).

Because the unique geology of Illinois provides extensive potential to store carbon dioxide deep underground, the state is also an ideal location to develop, demonstrate, and deploy technologies to  capture CO2 from point sources, remove CO2 from the ambient air, and beneficially use CO2. ISTC scientists and engineers lead a number of carbon capture, removal, and use projects backed by funding from the Department of Energy.

map of ISTC carbon capture project locations across Illinois and Missouri

The tour included carbon capture projects at Abbott Power Plant at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; City Water, Light & Power in Springfield, Prairie State Generating Company in Marissa, Illinois; and the Ste. Genevieve Cement Plant in Missouri. 

Abbott Power Plant

The University’s Abbott Power Plant , a cogeneration facility that simultaneously produces both steam and electricity to meet 70-75% of the Urbana campus’s energy needs, is a partner on two ISTC-led carbon capture projects.  

ISTC led a project, supported by $3.4 million from DOE-NETL, to evaluate an innovative biphasic solvent system for its efficiency and effectiveness in absorbing CO₂ from flue gas at Abbott. The system was designed based on the testing results at the laboratory scale under a previous DOE cooperative agreement. Read more about the biphasic solvent system.

A second project is based on a mixed-salt carbon capture technology developed by SRI International. This technology is being tested at engineering scale at Abbott in a 0.5 megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent pilot campaign. This project is supported by a grant of more than $18 million from DOE-NETL. Read more about the mixed-salt capture technology.

City Water, Light & Power

ISTC leads the large-scale pilot testing of a Linde-BASF CO2 solvent-based carbon capture technology at City Water, Light & Power (CWLP) in Springfield, Illinois. When the 10-megawatt capture system is built and begins to process 5 percent of the Dallman Unit 4 flue gas, it will capture more than 90 percent of those CO2 emissions. DOE has provided $47 million for this build-operate project, and the State of Illinois has pledged an additional $20 million. Read more about the large pilot project at CWLP.

A second project led by ISTC and backed by $25 million from DOE aims to design a next-generation power plant at CWLP that both reduces emissions and captures and uses carbon dioxide. The design combines a 270-megawatt ultra-supercritical coal boiler, an 87-megawatt natural gas combustion turbine generator, a 50-megawatt energy storage subsystem, and a post-combustion carbon capture subsystem. Read more about the next-generation power plant project.

ISTC is investigating the use of CO2 captured from CWLP, as well as nutrients from wastewater treatment plants to grow algae. The cultivated high-protein Spirulina can be used in animal feeds. This engineering-scale algae project is supported by $2.5 million from DOE. Read more about the algae project

Prairie State Generating Company

ISTC leads a front-end engineering design (FEED) study to retrofit the Prairie State Generating Company (PSGC) in Marissa, Illinois, with a solvent-based post-combustion carbon capture technology from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. At 816 megawatts, this is the largest carbon capture FEED study in the world, with a system projected to be capable of capturing 8.5 million tonnes of CO2 each year.Read more about the FEED study at Prairie State Generating Company.

Kevin OBrien gestures as he describes ISTC carbon capture projects for visitors from DOE and Doosan
ISTC director Kevin OBrien gestures as he describes ISTC carbon capture projects for visitors from DOE and Doosan. Photo by Travis Tate, U of I Facilities & Services. 

Ste. Genevieve Cement Plant

Cement is a ubiquitous construction material, and its production produces tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. While scientists are working on alternative cements and lower-carbon production processes, it is likely that capturing and either using or storing emissions from cement production will be necessary to meet carbon reduction targets.

ISTC leads a front-end engineering and design (FEED) study for a commercial-scale carbon capture retrofit of Holcim’s Ste. Genevieve Cement Plant in Bloomsdale, Missouri. The project focuses on Air Liquide’s CrycocapTM FG system for carbon capture and is backed by $4 million from DOE-NETL. Read more about the Ste. Genevieve carbon capture project.

Carbon removal through direct air capture

Projects to remove carbon dioxide from ambient air, called direct air capture (DAC), were not included in the recent tour but are a growing part of ISTC’s carbon management portfolio. 

ISTC leads a project, backed by a grant of nearly $2.5 million from DOE-NETL, to develop preliminary designs and determine feasibility for the first commercial-scale direct air capture and storage system (DAC+S) for CO2 removal in the United States. This 18-month project will explore the possibility of pulling 100,000 tonnes of CO2 from the air annually, using technology from the Swiss company Climeworks, which has built and operated several DAC plants in various climates across Europe. The ISTC-led team will test the large-scale DAC systems at three sites across the U.S. in order to assess how different climate conditions impact the process. Read more about the DAC+S project

ISTC and Climeworks also are collaborating on a $2.5 million FEED study of a DAC system to capture CO2 for underground storage. The California host site, a geothermal plant, will provide thermal energy to drive the DAC process; the site also is close to a proposed geological storage facility in the Joaquin Basin.   

ISTC also leads a FEED study of direct air capture technology developed by CarbonCapture Inc. at U. S. Steel’s Gary Works Plant in Gary, Indiana. This project incorporates use of the captured carbon dioxide at a nearby Ozinga ready mix concrete plant. Injecting the CO2 into the concrete as it is being mixed causes the CO2 to mineralize, locking it in the concrete and preventing it from returning to the atmosphere. By using the U. S. Steel plant’s waste heat, energy needs can be reduced. Read more about the carbon capture and use FEED study at U. S. Steel’s Gary Works Plant.  

Finally, ISTC is a partner on a project that is exploring the benefits of constructing DAC technology at Constellation Energy’s Byron nuclear energy plant in Northern Illinois. Although nuclear plants do not produce carbon emissions, the plant can provide energy to power the DAC system, which could capture 250,000 tons of CO2 each year. 

Read more about sustainable energy research and development at the Prairie Research Institute.

Worldwide carbon capture, utilization, and storage industry expected to reach $9.4B by 2027

Read the full story from Environment + Energy Leader.

The Global Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) Market is estimated to be $2.84 billion in 2022 and is projected to reach $9.43 billion by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 27.14%. That’s according to a new report by ResearchandMarkets.com.