2016 Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature

More information

“New environmental literature” refers to literary works that focus on the environment, animal protection, ecology, and wildlife.

The organizers are looking for work that redefines notions of environmentalism and sustainability, particularly when it comes to animal protection. They are not seeking books about hunting, fishing, or eating animals—unless they are analogous to a good anti-war novel being all about war. Under these basic guidelines, however, they’re open to reading a wide range of fiction and nonfiction with environmental and animal themes.

The winner will receive:

    • A cash award of $1,000

 

  • A four-week residency at PLAYA

 

The contest is open to published or unpublished full-length prose manuscripts, including novels, memoirs, short story collections, and essay collections.

Manuscripts should be approximately 40,000 to 90,000 words (i.e., please do not send novellas or individual essays or stories; please also note the contest is not open to poetry or children’s books).

Published books eligible for the prize must have been published within the past five (5) years; books published in the year 2010 or earlier are not eligible.

Manuscripts must be received between September 1, 2016 and December 31, 2016.

The Afterlife of Cheap Clothes

Read the excerpt from Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion in Slate. Reduce your consumption and find the book at a library near you.

Where do your Target bargains go when you get tired of them? The Salvation Army. Rag bins. And Africa.

A very late book review: John D. MacDonald’s Condominium

Read the full review in Treehugger.

While writing about the Porsche Design Tower tower nearing completion in Sunny Isle Beach, a post about real estate and climate in Florida, I remembered a great old book about real estate and climate in Florida, Condominium, by John D MacDonald, published in 1977.

Here’s your sustainability summer reading list

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Summer is here, hopefully bringing more opportunities to catch up on leisure reading. While you may eat, drink and breathe news and feature articles, a deep dive into a good book can bring deeper knowledge and satisfaction.

Whether postcapitalism, billion-dollar brands, the circular economy or grand strategies pique your interest, there are plenty of great new titles this summer.

Below, find seven new books that should be on every corporate sustainability professional’s radar. (You’ll also find our latest excerpts of books here, which GreenBiz runs on Saturdays.)

The Lorax and Literature’s Moral Obligation

Read the full story in The Atlantic.

Despite critics’ dismissal of activist-minded fiction, the author Lydia Millet believes that Dr. Seuss’s classic children’s book is powerful because of its message, not in spite of it.

Booklist: Books to Celebrate Earth Day and the Environmentalist in All of Us

Read the full post at The Hub.

Friday, April 22, 2016 is National Earth Day, a day celebrated around the globe to demonstrate support for environmental protection. Started in 1970 and gaining momentum in the 1990s, Earth Day is great time to reevaluate the impact that we are having on the planet. Environmentalism has often been a cause taken up with passion by teens and new adults, and one recent study shows that during the recession years, conservations efforts among teens rose.

In honor of Earth Day, here is a list of nonfiction and fiction titles that explore a variety of aspects of environmental issues and conservation actions.

The Subfield That Is Changing the Landscape of Literary Studies

Read the full story in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

A burgeoning subfield of literary studies that focuses on human beings’ impact on the environment is changing the curricula of English departments across the country.

Climate fiction — cli-fi, for short — often depicts a grim future of a changed world, portraying how humanity must deal with years of environmental neglect. The genre, which has seen a fourfold increase in published books in the past six years, according to data collected by Eco-fiction.com, is giving professors and students a bevy of books outside of environmental studies to anchor discussions of climate change and its consequences.