Call for Nominations: Landmark Behavior Change Case Studies

Tools of Change is soliciting nominations for its 2017 Landmark behavior change case studies in two topic areas – (1) energy conservation and (2) sustainable transportation. If you know of anyone working on a particularly effective or innovative approach for changing energy or transportation behaviours, please consider nominating them – or yourself. All nominations must include measured impact results.

Designation as a “Landmark” (best practice) case study through this peer selection process recognizes behavior change programs and approaches considered to be among the most successful, innovative, replicable and adaptable in the world. Designated programs gain exposure and credibility, and we prepare and post detailed on-line program case study materials, which may help them attract customers and investors, and maintain or increase program funding.

Nominations are screened by Tools of Change staff and then the most promising are rated by peer selection panels based on a standard scoring grid. Designated programs are highlighted in our webinars and written case studies, and in the accompanying webinar transcripts and video recordings. Program organizers get a Landmark designation logo for use on websites and in electronic newsletters, providing click-through access to the program’s case study materials.

The nomination form, which can be downloaded from www.toolsofchange.com/en/landmark/, must be submitted by June 5, 2017. Designations will be announced by October 2017, and case study webinars will be presented between January and June 2018.

To view Landmark case studies designated in past years, go to www.toolsofchange.com/en/landmark/.

Up for a Challenge? The TRI Program is seeking University Partners!

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program is challenging the academic community to find innovative ways to use TRI data to promote collaboration among communities, manufacturers, and government or between environmental programs.

For the 2017 TRI University Challenge, EPA is looking to academic institutions to help build a diverse portfolio of practical and replicable projects that benefit communities, the environment, TRI-covered industrial facilities, academic institutions, and the TRI Program. This year, we’ll be prioritizing proposals that use chemical pollution release and pollution prevention data to promote collaboration, but students and professors may submit any project ideas that increase the knowledge, use, and understanding of TRI data and other related information. Example project ideas include:

  • Develop specific products that can be used by industry and community stakeholders to increase awareness and use of North American chemical release and pollution prevention data from TRI and from the Commission for Environmental Cooperation’s Taking Stock Online, and develop a plan for distribution of the products;
  • Produce a replicable strategy and tools (e.g., Good Neighbor Agreements) for engaging community members and local reporting facilities in a productive dialogue;
  • Demonstrate the benefits of multi-stakeholder collaboration for reducing the use and releases of toxic chemicals as measured by chemical pollution data;
  • Bring together data from TRI and other data sources to show trends in environmental or human health outcomes in communities, either within the U.S. or across North America; and
  • Identify pollution prevention successes achieved by facilities, and develop strategies for sharing such successes with communities and other facilities

Institutions whose project proposals are selected will serve as 2017 TRI University Challenge partners. Partners will receive direct non-monetary support from EPA TRI staff experts and, depending on the outcome of their project, may receive national recognition for their project as well as speaking opportunities at conferences and events.

Want to join us?

  • Begin developing a proposal! Start thinking about a project that fits the challenge and develop your proposal materials. Submit your proposal to Caitlin Briere by midnight on April 21, 2017.
  • Learn more! Visit the TRI University Challenge webpage to learn more about the challenge and past participants.
  • Spread the word! Distribute this announcement to your colleagues in the academic community who might be interested in joining the TRI University Challenge.
  • Don’t miss an update! Sign-up to receive emails about the TRI University Challenge in your mailbox.

Need more information? Please contact Caitlin Briere, the TRI University Challenge lead.

Chemical Challenge Targets Technologies to Overcome Environmental Management Hurdles

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

How to enable wastewater-free chemical sites? That is the question — or at least one of questions AkzoNobel wants startup firms and other innovators to answer in its Chemicals Startup Challenge.

The aim of the AkzoNobel Chemicals Startup Challenge, launched in conjunction with KPMG, is to identify interesting startups and solutions that have a strategic fit with AkzoNobel’s businesses and develop partnerships with them. The challenge will give the winners the chance to see their ideas become a commercial reality.

Society of Environmental Journalists Awards for Reporting on the Environment now accepting entries

SEJ’s awards honor the best environmental journalism in seven categories, bringing recognition to the most important stories on the planet. TV, radio, print and online journalism about environment or related issues are eligible. $500 offered for first-place winners in all categories.
Deadline to enter: April 1, 11:59PM your local time
Cost to enter: $40 Members or $100.Members must be logged in to access the member rate.
  • Eligible entries: Journalism publisher or aired March 1, 2016 – Feb. 28, 2017.
  • Rachel Carson Environment Book category: Books published in 2016.
For details, rules, FAQs and entry forms, visit http://bit.ly/SEJAwards2017

President’s Environmental Youth Award now accepting applications

The President’s Environmental Youth Award (PEYA) recognizes K-12 students and their efforts to protect the environment. The award promotes awareness of our nation’s natural resources and encourages positive community involvement.

Winning projects have included restoring natural habitats, starting recycling programs at school and in communities, and installing renewable energy projects. Applications are due March 1, 2017.

EPA Announces Groundwater Awareness Week Video Challenge

EPA  announced its first National Groundwater Awareness Week Video Challenge.

Beginning February 1, EPA invites the public to create and submit a video that increases awareness and understanding about the importance of protecting and conserving groundwater. Example video topics may include demonstrating the importance of groundwater, explain where groundwater can be found or what you can do to protect sources of groundwater.

The winning videos will be posted on EPA’s website and recognized during National Groundwater Awareness Week from March 5-11, 2017.

EPA honors Crystal Creamery for reducing waste from Modesto plant

Read the full story in the Modesto Bee.

Crystal Creamery received a national award Tuesday for how it handles the sludge left after making ice cream, yogurt and other dairy foods.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency honored the Modesto-based company for turning the waste into electricity and other byproducts. It presented the annual Food Recovery Challenge National Innovation Award, part of a federal effort to reduce food waste estimated at 37 million tons a year.