For Your Next Adult Coloring Book, Shade In Data On Climate Change

Read the full story in Fast Company.

In a new coloring book, you can trace a line around the border of arctic sea ice in 1996 and shade in what has been lost since then–an area the size of India–or you can color-code each day of 2015 based on the level of air pollution in Beijing. You can also color in coastlines to show the land that will be lost to sea level rise, or challenge yourself to color in 20 football fields in a minute, the rate at which global forests are disappearing.

London sculpture spotlights the deadly relationship between seabirds and plastic

Read the full story at Mother Nature Network.

The last time environmental activist and underwater sculptor par excellence Jason deCaires Taylor worked in London, it was on “Rising Tides,” a hauntingly ephemeral installation positioned in the River Thames that served as commentary on rising sea levels and our unquenchable thirst for fossil fuels.

Taking the form of four prophetic horsemen — two children, two bureaucratic-looking gents in suits and ties — straddling oil pumpjack-headed equines, “Rising Tides” was as provocative as urban statuary gets. Centered around plastic-barfing seabirds, Taylor’s latest work — a somewhat rare terrestrial piece that’s not fully or partially submerged underwater — is no different, perhaps even a bit more startling than its predecessor. As it should be.

Artist Turns Old CDs Into Amazing Sculptures Instead Of Throwing Them Away

Read the full story at Bored Panda.

A broken CD isn’t much good to anyone. Unless you’re Sean Avery that is. Because while most of us would just throw them in the trash, the South Africa-born, Australia-based artist turns them into various dazzling animal sculptures. He makes them by gluing CD shards to wire mesh frames shaped like different animals, and as you can see from his iridescent animal kingdom, there seems to be no limit to the types of creatures he can create.

Husky made from recycled CDs by artist Sean Avery.
Photo of Sean Avery’s husky sculpture from his web site.

Trash Meets Art with Recology’s Artist in Residence Program

Read the full story at Waste360.

Each year, San Francisco Bay Area artists have the chance to put their creative skills to the test with Recology’s Artist in Residence Program. Established in 1990, the program helps encourage the reuse of materials by allowing residents and artists to look at trash in a different light.

The program, which includes a four-month residency, a stipend, access to Recology’s large art studio, miscellaneous supplies and equipment and a spot in a three-day public exhibition, challenges residents to create artistic works of art from materials found in Recology’s public disposal and recycling area.

These Photos Make Deadly Industrial Pollution Look Eerily Beautiful

Read the full story in Fast Company.

J. Henry Fair’s work documents industrial production from above. It’s a sobering look at how much we’re altering the environment.

Furniture made from recycled newspaper has brick-like strength, marble finish

Read the full story at Curbed.

Sometimes designers make furniture out of paper and leave nothing to the imagination—just look at these lumpy lamps and stools. But such is not the case with a new furniture series from Netherlands-based designer Woojai Lee, who’s managed to transform paper into a polished, brick-like material.

The Bottle Project: What are Youth doing to Reduce Litter?

Read the full story from U.S. EPA.

During a trip to Costa Rica, I saw a recycle bin that was made out of plastic water bottles. This inspired me to start a community initiative called The Bottle Project, which encourages transparency about plastic consumption. My friends and I saw that our society has an unhealthy addiction to disposable plastics and we sought to raise awareness of this issue— specifically calling into question the necessity of plastic water bottles— by marrying creativity and conservation.