We’re not lion: The 2022 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards are a good laugh

Read the full story from NPR.

From a salmon punching a bear in the face to a penguin that seems to have no head, the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards announced its winners this year.

The organization fields thousands of submissions for each of its photo categories: creatures of the land, creatures of the air, creatures of the sea, a junior award for photographers 18 years old or under, an internet portfolio award, and a people’s choice award.

Science without Borders® Challenge: International Student Art Contest

Application deadline: Monday, March 6, 2023, midnight ET.

The Science Without Borders® Challenge is an international contest that engages students and teachers in ocean conservation through art. This annual competition inspires students to be creative while promoting public awareness of the need to preserve, protect, and restore the world’s oceans and aquatic resources, contributing to the overarching goals of the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. The Challenge is open to primary and secondary school students 11-19 years old, with scholarships of up to $500 awarded to the winning entries.

The theme for the 2023 Science without Borders® Challenge is “The Sixth Extinction.” For this year’s contest, you can help create awareness about endangered species. Students will create a piece of artwork that highlights the beauty and importance of a marine species that is on the brink of extinction. Learn about the theme.

To apply, fill out the online entry form, upload a picture of your artwork, and make sure everything is submitted before the deadline. If you are under the age of 13, your parents will be asked to provide consent. Before applying, check out Tips for Success for suggestions on how to make the most of your application, such as how to write a compelling artist’s statement and describing how your artwork relates to this year’s theme.

Learn more on the Living Oceans Foundation website.

Art Connection: Air

Air, an exhibit at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, invites the community to learn about the Wasatch Front’s air quality issues. Air features recent works by sixteen artists, poets, engineers, and designers from around the globe and Utah. It also includes posters by sixteen student artists, winners of the 2020 Utah High School Clean Air Marketing Contest. As we explore Air, we learn how this exhibition is intended to enter and move through people, past gallery walls and exit signs, and into your everyday conversations, classrooms, and the lives of the people who are impacted by the quality of air where they live.

Photographers don’t (always) harm bird nesting behavior

Read the full story from Treehugger.

The newfound interest in bird-watching and bird photography might be great for human mental health and social distancing. But scientists have been concerned about how all this up-close observation is affecting birds in their nests.

New research finds they didn’t have to worry as much as they thought.

A ceramics artist transformed seafood scraps from a UK restaurant into stylish plates and bowls

Read the full story at the Robb Report.

Restaurants are notorious for the amount of food waste they create. One ceramics designer is hoping to change that, though.

The London-based Carly Breame created a recent collection titled “Off the Menu,” which consists of ceramics made from a local restaurant’s food scraps. Fish bones, fruit peels and oyster shells all feature in the crockery, which is intended to be used as servingware in the same restaurant.

Plastic pollution: Birds all over the world are living in our rubbish

Read the full story from the BBC.

Birds from every continent except Antarctica have been photographed nesting or tangled in our rubbish. Photos were submitted by people from all over the world to an online project called Birds and Debris. The scientists running the project say they see birds ensnared – or nesting – in everything from rope and fishing line to balloon ribbon and a flip-flop. Nearly a quarter of the photographs show birds nesting or entangled in disposable face masks. The focus of the project is on capturing the impact of waste – particularly plastic pollution – on the avian world.

City critters are focus of Urban Wildlife Photo Awards

Read the full story at Treehugger.

Two coyotes pass in the night on a street in Ontario. An amateur photographer was there to capture the moment, earning top honors in a wildlife competition.

Andrew Interisano won the inaugural Urban Wildlife Photography Awards with his image “Date Night.”

Winners of the 2022 Audubon Photography Awards celebrate the beauty of our feathered friends

Read the full story at My Modern Met.

Now in its 13th year, the Audubon Photography Awards are a celebration of bird photography. Arranged by the National Audubon Society, an organization whose mission is to protect birds and their environment, the contest had 2,500 entries from across the United States and Canada. This year’s grand prize went to Jack Zhi for his image of two raptors in flight.

Young artists capture the beauty of endangered species

Read the full story at Treehugger.

Colorful bumblebees flit among flowers. Water birds strut along the shore. A garter snake protects her eggs.

These are some of the winning images in the 2022 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest, sponsored by the Endangered Species Coalition.

A botanical mystery solved, after 146 years

Read the full story at Atlas Obscura.

How a young illustrator’s attention to detail—and a determined Victorian woman’s legacy—led to the discovery of a new species in an old painting.