Trash Meets Art with Recology’s Artist in Residence Program

Read the full story at Waste360.

Each year, San Francisco Bay Area artists have the chance to put their creative skills to the test with Recology’s Artist in Residence Program. Established in 1990, the program helps encourage the reuse of materials by allowing residents and artists to look at trash in a different light.

The program, which includes a four-month residency, a stipend, access to Recology’s large art studio, miscellaneous supplies and equipment and a spot in a three-day public exhibition, challenges residents to create artistic works of art from materials found in Recology’s public disposal and recycling area.

These Photos Make Deadly Industrial Pollution Look Eerily Beautiful

Read the full story in Fast Company.

J. Henry Fair’s work documents industrial production from above. It’s a sobering look at how much we’re altering the environment.

Furniture made from recycled newspaper has brick-like strength, marble finish

Read the full story at Curbed.

Sometimes designers make furniture out of paper and leave nothing to the imagination—just look at these lumpy lamps and stools. But such is not the case with a new furniture series from Netherlands-based designer Woojai Lee, who’s managed to transform paper into a polished, brick-like material.

The Bottle Project: What are Youth doing to Reduce Litter?

Read the full story from U.S. EPA.

During a trip to Costa Rica, I saw a recycle bin that was made out of plastic water bottles. This inspired me to start a community initiative called The Bottle Project, which encourages transparency about plastic consumption. My friends and I saw that our society has an unhealthy addiction to disposable plastics and we sought to raise awareness of this issue— specifically calling into question the necessity of plastic water bottles— by marrying creativity and conservation.

Photographs and graphics from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

From the MPCA web site:

The MPCA has a wealth of photos available on the agency’s Flickr site. You don’t need to sign in or have an account to access our Flickr photos. The images are organized by topic and easily downloadable. To download, click the image you want, click on the down arrow icon on the right side under the photo, and choose the image size.

MPCA photos cover topics such agriculture, air pollution, solid waste and recycling, water quality, alternative energy, blue-green algae, stormwater, and more. You can also find images from the MPCA’s annual Eco Experience exhibit at the Minnesota State Fair.

Images on the Flickr site generally have caption and background information included. We request that you attribute the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency as the source of any image you use.

The Melting Ice Sheet, The Artist, And The Space Agency

Read the full story in Fast Company.

Artist Justin Guariglia’s enormous artwork comes from embedding with NASA as it collects climate change data and is meant to last centuries, to serve as an artifact itself of how humanity is reshaping the planet.

Public Art or Renewable Energy? New Designs Aim to Produce Both

Read the full story at E360 Digest.

As cities look to incorporate sustainable technologies into their infrastructure, a design competition is challenging artists and architects to create artwork that can both generate renewable energy and enlighten the public on environmental issues.