Photographers don’t (always) harm bird nesting behavior

Read the full story from Treehugger.

The newfound interest in bird-watching and bird photography might be great for human mental health and social distancing. But scientists have been concerned about how all this up-close observation is affecting birds in their nests.

New research finds they didn’t have to worry as much as they thought.

A ceramics artist transformed seafood scraps from a UK restaurant into stylish plates and bowls

Read the full story at the Robb Report.

Restaurants are notorious for the amount of food waste they create. One ceramics designer is hoping to change that, though.

The London-based Carly Breame created a recent collection titled “Off the Menu,” which consists of ceramics made from a local restaurant’s food scraps. Fish bones, fruit peels and oyster shells all feature in the crockery, which is intended to be used as servingware in the same restaurant.

Plastic pollution: Birds all over the world are living in our rubbish

Read the full story from the BBC.

Birds from every continent except Antarctica have been photographed nesting or tangled in our rubbish. Photos were submitted by people from all over the world to an online project called Birds and Debris. The scientists running the project say they see birds ensnared – or nesting – in everything from rope and fishing line to balloon ribbon and a flip-flop. Nearly a quarter of the photographs show birds nesting or entangled in disposable face masks. The focus of the project is on capturing the impact of waste – particularly plastic pollution – on the avian world.

City critters are focus of Urban Wildlife Photo Awards

Read the full story at Treehugger.

Two coyotes pass in the night on a street in Ontario. An amateur photographer was there to capture the moment, earning top honors in a wildlife competition.

Andrew Interisano won the inaugural Urban Wildlife Photography Awards with his image “Date Night.”

Winners of the 2022 Audubon Photography Awards celebrate the beauty of our feathered friends

Read the full story at My Modern Met.

Now in its 13th year, the Audubon Photography Awards are a celebration of bird photography. Arranged by the National Audubon Society, an organization whose mission is to protect birds and their environment, the contest had 2,500 entries from across the United States and Canada. This year’s grand prize went to Jack Zhi for his image of two raptors in flight.

Young artists capture the beauty of endangered species

Read the full story at Treehugger.

Colorful bumblebees flit among flowers. Water birds strut along the shore. A garter snake protects her eggs.

These are some of the winning images in the 2022 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest, sponsored by the Endangered Species Coalition.

A botanical mystery solved, after 146 years

Read the full story at Atlas Obscura.

How a young illustrator’s attention to detail—and a determined Victorian woman’s legacy—led to the discovery of a new species in an old painting.

How should art reckon with climate change?

Read the full story in the New York Times.

As the environmental crisis accelerates, contemporary artists have taken up the mantle of addressing the precarious present.

This play is touring Europe. But no one’s going anywhere.

Read the full story in the New York Times.

How can theaters adapt to prevent climate change? The British director Katie Mitchell and a Swiss playhouse have developed a new model for taking a production on the road.

Climate fiction is the future. Write it.

Read the full story from Grist.

Fix, Grist’s solutions lab, is excited to announce that we are accepting submissions for our second annual climate fiction short-story contest, Imagine 2200: Climate Fiction for Future Ancestors. There is no cost to enter.

Fix was founded on the simple premise that promising solutions to the climate crisis exist — they just haven’t gained enough momentum to take off. With Imagine 2200, we’re inviting writers to envision a future in which those solutions soar, and our world is radically better. Our hope is that this fiction contest, and the collection of stories we publish, will be part of an uprising of imagination — something we believe is necessary to get us out of this climate crisis.

Ready to get inspired? Check out the winning stories from the inaugural year of Imagine 2200.

This initiative celebrates short stories rooted in hope, justice, creative solutions, and cultural authenticity, while amplifying voices that have been, and continue to be, affected by systems of oppression. 

Imagine 2200 is inspired and informed by literary movements like Afrofuturism and Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, disabled, feminist, and queer futurisms, along with hopepunk and solarpunk. We hope writers look to these genres for inspiration, and we urge writers within these communities to submit stories. A truly clean, green, just future is about so much more than slashing carbon emissions. It means upending the status quo of colonialism, extraction, and oppression. We’re eager to share your visions for achieving that.

Submissions for year two are now open. We’re looking for stories of 3,000 to 5,000 words that envision the next 180 years of climate progress — roughly seven generations. The winning writer will be awarded $3,000, with the second- and third-place winners receiving $2,000 and $1,000, respectively. An additional nine finalists will each receive $300. Winners and finalists will be published in Fall 2022 in an immersive collection on Fix’s website and celebrated during a virtual event.

The deadline for submission is May 5, 2022, by 11:59 p.m. U.S. Pacific Standard Time.