Assessing the ecological risk of PFAS: Current state of the science and identification of needs

Ankley, G. Assessing the ecological risk of PFAS: Current state of the science and identification of needs. “EPA-ECOS-ASTHO PFAS Science Call” Webinar, Duluth, MN, February 22, 2021. https://doi.org/10.23645/epacomptox.13705408

Abstract: PFAS are a large, heterogenous group of chemicals of potential concern not just to human health but the environment. Based on information for a few relatively well understood PFAS such as PFOS or PFOA, there is ample basis to suspect that at least a subset can be considered persistent, bioaccumulative, and/or toxic. The Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) recently sponsored a workshop that focused on the state-of-the-science supporting risk assessment of PFAS. This presentation will summarize discussions concerning what is known about the ecotoxicology and ecological risks of PFAS. The talk also will identify data gaps and needs, including the development of more comprehensive monitoring programs to support exposure assessment, an emphasis on research to support the formulation of predictive models for bioaccumulation, and the development of in silico, in vitro, and in vivo methods to efficiently assess biological effects for potentially sensitive species/endpoints. Addressing needs associated with assessing the ecological risk of PFAS will require cross-disciplinary approaches that employ both conventional and new methods in an integrated, resource-effective manner. The contents of this abstract neither constitute nor necessarily reflect US EPA policy.

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