Extra food is rotting on farms while Americans go hungry. This group is trying to fix that.

Read the full story in the Washington Post.

Food banks in the United States are grappling with unprecedented need — a direct symptom of widespread unemployment, as roughly 16 percent of Americans are still without a paycheck. In 30 percent of U.S. households that have lost income because of the coronavirus, meals have been missed and families have relied heavily on food handouts.

James Kanoff, 21, a sophomore at Stanford University, took note of the troubling paradox: Farms have a surplus of food from canceled restaurant contracts and a shattered supply chain, while food banks are experiencing a staggering surge in demand.

The supply of produce was there, said Kanoff, and so was the demand for it — but the link connecting the two was missing.

So Kanoff and a group of college students from Stanford and Brown universities started FarmLink, a grass-roots movement to prevent food waste while also working to address food insecurity. FarmLink raises money to pay farmers for produce and dairy that would otherwise be wasted, then funds the transportation to send the goods to food banks in the neediest areas around the country.

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