Day: January 9, 2020

Lessons From a ‘Local Food’ Scam Artist

Read the full story at Narratively.

Working summers at an authentically quaint roadside produce stand, a teenage salesperson is schooled in the not-so-subtle art of how to con a foodie from the big city.

Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat

Read the full story in the New York Times.

The golf course in Jersey City, N.J., says it needs the land to compete for tournaments. A birder counters, “It’s really just an obscenity.”

Apply Now for Student and Teacher Environmental Education Award Programs

EPA’s Office of Environmental Education is now accepting applications for the 2020 President’s Environmental Youth Awards (PEYA) and Presidential Innovation Awards for Environmental Educators (PIAEE). Winners will be invited to Washington, D.C. in mid-2020 to be honored by the agency and present their work in a poster session.

Applications for both awards programs are due no later than January 15, 2020.

Established by the 1990 National Environmental Education Act (NEEA), PEYA recognizes outstanding environmental stewardship projects from Kindergarten to 12th grade, by promoting environmental awareness and encouraging community involvement. Also established by the 1990 National Environmental Education Act, PIAEE recognizes outstanding K-12 grade educators who integrate environmental and place-based, experiential learning into school curricula and school facility management across the country. Under NEAA, the White House Council on Environmental Quality assists EPA in administering the PIAEE awards program.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE 2020 AWARDS

EPA is seeking 2020 PEYA and PIAEE award applications for projects on a variety of environmental topics, including (but not limited to), projects on: 

  • reducing food waste and loss and excess food recovery efforts;
  • reducing contributions to ocean and marine litter;
  • solutions in recycling;
  • using science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) to teach environmental education;
  • environmental sustainability;
  • sustainable agricultural practices; and
  • healthy school environments.

The President’s Environmental Youth Awards (PEYA) recognizes outstanding environmental stewardship projects from grades K-12, by promoting environmental awareness and encouraging community involvement. EPA will select up to two winners in each of EPA’s 10 Regions – one regional winner for grades K-5, and one regional winner for grades 6-12. Winners of next year’s awards will be invited to participate in an awards ceremony and poster session in Washington, D.C. in mid-2020, and their projects will also be highlighted on EPA’s website. All student projects must be sponsored by at least one adult over the age of 21. And, if the sponsor is not a teacher, the project must have a teacher as a co-sponsor. The application and eligibility information are available at https://www.epa.gov/education/presidents-environmental-youth-award.

The Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators (PIAEE) recognizes outstanding teachers for K-12 who employ innovative approaches to environmental education. Up to two teachers from each of EPA’s 10 regions, from different states, will be selected to receive this award. Teachers will receive a Presidential plaque and an award of up to $2,500 to be used to further professional development in environmental education. Winning teachers’ local education agencies will also receive awards of up to $2,500 to fund environmental educational activities and programs. Winners of next year’s awards will be invited to participate in an awards ceremony and poster session in Washington, D.C. in mid-2020, and their projects will also be highlighted on EPA’s website. The application and eligibility information are available at https://www.epa.gov/education/presidential-innovation-award-environmental-educators.

For more information on the youth awards (PEYA), please contact: PEYA@epa.gov  

For more information on the teacher (PIAEE) award, please contact: PIAEE@epa.gov

A better way for countries to track their progress on sustainability

Read the full story in Nature.

A US–Chinese team shows how sustainability metrics can be improved.

Urgent new ‘roadmap to recovery’ could reverse insect apocalypse

Read the full story in The Guardian.

Phasing out synthetic pesticides and fertilisers and aggressive emission reductions among series of solutions outlined by scientists

How can we adapt to climate change? This online hub has answers.

Read the full story at Ensia.

If the 2010s were the decade when we confirmed we were right about climate change — with a growing number of people worried as fires, floods and droughts announce a climate emergency here and now — then the 2020s will be the decade when we’ll need to face the crisis head on.

Even as we strive to stop the globe from getting hotter still in order to avoid another “lost decade,” we’ll also have to adjust to changes already happening.

The good news: There’s no need to start from scratch, thanks to the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), a collection of more than 2,000 vetted resources on climate adaptation compiled since 2010 by EcoAdapt, a nonprofit based in Washington state.

Check for publication integrity before misconduct

Read the full story in Nature.

A tool that focuses on papers — not researcher behaviour — can help readers, editors and institutions assess which publications to trust.

Nonprofit Gets Hotel Soap into Hands That Need It Most

Read the full story in Hotel Business.

A bar of soap can save someone’s life. Soap is a basic necessity, yet many people don’t have access to it. Soap Aid USA’s new Hotel to Hands Program aims to transform lives globally by registering more than 120,000 guestrooms, recycling 2.3 million new bars of soap, and delivering soap to 200,000 children in critical need for a full year.

BVSD participates in national food waste study

Read the full story in the Daily Camera.

Boulder Valley is one of nine districts around the country that took part in a World Wildlife Fund school lunch food waste audit, which found a district student tosses an average of 43 pounds of food a year.

Heat or eat? How one energy conservation strategy may hurt vulnerable populations

Read the full story from Ohio State University.

Any economic and conservation benefits associated with time-of-use electricity billing could be achieved at the expense of some of the most vulnerable citizens in our society: people with disabilities and the elderly, new research suggests.

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