Working lands play a key role in protecting biodiversity

Read the full story from Phys.org.

With a body the size of a fist and wings that span more than a foot, the big brown bat must gorge on 6,000 to 8,000 bugs a night to maintain its stature. This mighty appetite can be a boon to farmers battling crop-eating pests.

But few types of bats live on American farms. That’s because the current practice of monoculture—dedicating large swathes of land to a single crop—doesn’t give the bats many places to land or to nest.

Diversifying working lands—including farmland, rangeland and forests—may be key to preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change, says a new review paper published this week in Science by conservation biologists at the University of California, Berkeley.

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