Is Congress about to wreck America’s natural treasures?

Read the full story in The Guardian.

One-hundred-eleven years and a few months ago, Theodore Roosevelt signed the landmark law that helped cement his place as America’s conservation president.

The Antiquities Act is brief – just two sentences allow a president to set aside for federal protection “objects of historic or scientific interest”.

It’s been used dozens of times by 16 presidents from both parties to preserve some of America’s most beloved wild lands and historic landmarks, laying the foundations for national parks and generations of family adventures. Many national parks – including South Dakota’s Badlands, Alaska’s Kenai Fjords and Death Valley in California and Nevada – began as national monuments.

Those lands are now facing a two-headed assault from Congress and the Trump administration, and the act itself faces an uncertain future.

Author: Laura B.

I'm the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center's Sustainability Information Curator, which is a fancy way of saying embedded librarian. I'm also Executive Director of the Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable. When not writing for Environmental News Bits, I'm an avid reader. Visit Laura's Reads to see what I'm currently reading.

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