We will close the loop on waste by 2030

Read the full story in GreenBiz. On Labor Day, a typical American shopper bought a bag of chips, a tub of salsa and a six-pack to bring to a friend’s barbeque. Behind that purchase are a variety of actors, including brands, retailers and packaging manufacturers. If that shopper does not recycle, instead disposing of the empty bag and tub in …

Air Pollution From Industry Plagues Houston In Harvey’s Wake

Read the full story from NPR. Much of the public health focus in Houston has been on the hazards posed by flood waters, but the city is also facing a crisis in air quality. Even under normal circumstances, "air quality is a big problem in Houston," says Loren Raun, the chief scientist for the Houston …

Storm surges are the worst part of a hurricane — and will get even more destructive

Read the full story in the Washington Post. Because so much water is involved, surges are frequently a hurricane's deadliest symptom. Many of the estimated 1,500 deaths from Hurricane Katrina could be attributed to the storm surge along the Gulf Coast, according to the National Hurricane Center. In Mississippi, the surge achieved “historical proportions,” with the highest elevation marked at more …

240-year-old nautical maps show coral loss is much worse than we knew

Read the full story in the Washington Post. Between 1773 and 1775, George Gauld, a surveyor with the British Admiralty, immortalized the coast of the Florida Keys in ink. Though his most pressing goal was to record the depth of the sea — to prevent future shipwrecks — Gauld embraced his naturalist side, too. He sprinkled his maps with miscellany that …

Flint water crisis led to lower fertility rates, higher fetal death rates, researchers find

Read the full story from the University of Kansas. Flint's lead-contaminated water crisis caused fewer babies being born there — through reduced fertility rates and higher fetal death rates — compared with other Michigan cities during that time, according to a working paper that includes a University of Kansas researcher. "Having children in America is …

Fight over labeling of ‘flushable’ wipes headed to federal court

Read the full story in the Washington Post. The question of whether flushable wipes — used by potty-training toddlers and people looking beyond traditional toilet paper — are clogging sewer systems will be hashed out in federal court, where a manufacturer has sued the District over a new city law regulating when such wipes can …