Portland to fuel city vehicles with sewage fumes

Read the full story at Mother Nature Network. Portland, Oregon’s reputation for setting itself apart from the pack — and then some — is well deserved. And while not the first city to capture noxious sewage gas and convert it into vehicle fuel, Portland’s newly approved $9 million "poop-to-power" scheme is certainly ambitious, aiming to …

Webinar: Rethinking Thinking about Sustainability Curriculum

June 7 from 2:00-3:00 pm CDT Register at http://www.aashe.org/calendar/rethinking-thinking-sustainability-curriculum/ If a snap of the fingers could reverse the environmental destruction of the past 400 years, we would start repeating our mistakes tomorrow, unless we have changed. The environmental crisis is a symptom of human thinking and we need to think differently to resolve it. Split …

Upcoming RCRA Changes and How They’ll Affect Your Business

Read the full story from the Iowa Waste Reduction Center. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the law that oversees the proper management of hazardous and non-hazardous solid waste, is seeing some major updates go into effect on May 30, 2017. A majority of the rules within RCRA are from amendments made in 1984 …

By the Numbers: The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste

Read the full story from the World Resources Institute. We are all interested in seeing value for money – whether we are individuals, businesses or government. Now, a new report makes plain the very sound business case for reducing food loss and waste. The figures will turn the head of even the hardest-nosed budget director.

Cities Boost Efforts to Reduce Energy Waste: Here’s How They Rank

Read the full post from ACEEE. As the federal government weighs budget cuts to energy efficiency programs, cities are stepping up efforts to reduce energy waste. More mayors and local lawmakers in America’s largest cities are turning to energy efficiency to reduce energy costs for consumers and businesses, strengthen the resilience of their communities, and …

Treating wastewater wastes energy, but it doesn’t have to

Read the full story in GreenBiz. Wastewater treatment plants are energy hogs. A 2013 study by the Electric Power Research Institute and Water Research Foundation reported that they consumed about 30 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity per year, or about 0.8 percent of the total electricity used in the United States. Wastewater treatment’s high energy footprint …