The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary adaptation to toxic pollution in wild fish

Noah M. Reid, Dina A. Proestou, Bryan W. Clark, Wesley C. Warren, John K. Colbourne, Joseph R. Shaw, Sibel I. Karchner, Mark E. Hahn, Diane Nacci, Marjorie F. Oleksiak, Douglas L. Crawford, Andrew Whitehead (2016). “The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary adaptation to toxic pollution in wild fish.” Science 09 Dec 2016 : 1305-1308. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah4993

Abstract: Many organisms have evolved tolerance to natural and human-generated toxins. Reid et al. performed a genomic analysis of killifish, geographically separate and independent populations of which have adapted recently to severe pollution (see the Perspective by Tobler and Culumber). Sequencing multiple sensitive and resistant populations revealed signals of selective sweeps for variants that may confer tolerance to toxins, some of which were shared between resistant populations. Thus, high genetic diversity in killifish seems to allow selection to act on existing variation, driving rapid adaptation to selective forces such as pollution.

Author: Laura B.

I'm the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center's Sustainability Information Curator, which is a fancy way of saying embedded librarian. I'm also Executive Director of the Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable. When not writing for Environmental News Bits, I'm an avid reader. Visit Laura's Reads to see what I'm currently reading.

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