Day: March 27, 2017

Webinar: Upcoming Research on the Impacts of Water Conservation on Water Quality in Premise Plumbing

March 29, 2017, 1-2 p.m. CDT
Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5773508450972951043.

This webinar, presented by two recently awarded National Priorities grantees, will describe upcoming research and new science on the impacts of water conservation on water quality in premise plumbing systems. The projects are intended to inform how to better design, renovate, and manage building drinking water systems so that water can be delivered efficiently while protecting public health.

EPA’s Safe and Sustainable Water Resources research program provides the science and innovative technologies that the Agency and the nation need to maintain drinking water resources and systems, as well as to protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the nation’s waters. It uses an integrated, systems approach to support the availability of the clean, adequate, and equitable water supplies necessary for human well-being and resilient aquatic ecosystems. Safe and Sustainable Water Resources Strategic Research Action Plan: http://www2.epa.gov/research/safe-and-sustainable-water-resources-strategic-research-action-plan-2016-2019.

Methane Regulation Under Trump: New Administration Looks to Remove Obama-Era Controls

Read the full story at the Climate Law Blog.

Around this time of year, back in 1859, the first oil well was drilled by Edwin Drake in north-west Pennsylvania. After a slow start – drilling initially progressed at a rate of just three feet per day – Drake struck it lucky and hit oil at a depth of 69.5 feet. The oil was brought to
the surface with a primitive hand pump and collected in a bathtub while the associated natural gas escaped into the atmosphere.

A lot has changed in the subsequent 150 years. The oil and gas industry has developed into one of the country’s most technologically advanced, able to drill deeper and access reserves that Drake never would have foreseen. Despite these advances, however, some things have remained the same. To this day, oil drillers still often allow natural gas to escape into the atmosphere, rather than capturing it. Releases also occur during gas production due to accidental leaks, intentional venting, and incomplete flaring at well sites, storage facilities, and transport systems. The Obama Administration had tried to change that, adopting various regulations to reduce gas leaks, venting, and flaring. These regulations are unlikely to survive under President Trump, however. That’s bad news for anyone concerned about climate change. Or the environment and public health more generally.

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