Pulverizing e-waste is green, clean — and cold

Read the full story from Rice University.

Researchers at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science have an idea to simplify electronic waste recycling: Crush it into nanodust.

Specifically, they want to make the particles so small that separating different components is relatively simple compared with processes used to recycle electronic junk now…

The process is the subject of a Materials Today paper by Tiwary, Rice materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan and Indian Institute professors Kamanio Chattopadhyay and D.P. Mahapatra.

Minnesota worries about what’s in the water

Read the full story from MPR News.

Minnesota’s identity is closely linked to the state’s beautiful and abundant waters. But for all its beauty, deep concerns lie just below the surface.

According to the latest impaired waters list, about 40 percent of Minnesota’s lakes and streams are contaminated by pollutants.

How Global Warming Is Threatening Genetic Diversity

Read the full story at JSTOR Daily.

There is a huge unknown when it comes to protecting the meltwater stonefly and other species. Biologists are missing a huge piece of the puzzle — knowing which genetics will give species the evolutionary lift that allows them to adapt successfully to a warmer world. This hidden DNA and the possibly important traits it represents are known as “cryptic diversity,” and much of it is being lost, experts say, as the range of species contracts, fragments, and otherwise changes. Yet this DNA is vital because it contains information on different lineages and on species that are emerging, the cutting edge of evolution. Losing it will greatly complicate the task of assessing how climate change will affect biodiversity and what to protect.

California Upholds Auto Emissions Standards, Setting Up Face-Off With Trump

Read the full story in the New York Times.

California’s clean-air agency voted on Friday to push ahead with stricter emissions standards for cars and trucks, setting up a potential legal battle with the Trump administration over the state’s plan to reduce planet-warming gases.

Exploring the Green Infrastructure Workforce

Download the report.

Public demand has surged for “green” innovations that make cities more environmentally friendly and more pleasant places to live. JFF examined the workforce needed to keep up with demand for green infrastructure systems and found that projected employment growth provides valuable opportunities for low-income, low-skilled workers to earn competitive wages. Our research found good entry-level jobs with some advancement potential, ranging from maintenance of urban gardens to installation of natural systems that manage stormwater flooding. Industry-led efforts to develop the first national green infrastructure certification program may professionalize the field and accelerate job growth. This report is part of NatureWORKS, a national initiative to understand the skills, credentials, and potential of the U.S. green infrastructure workforce.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeJIFXQH3RA

University of Illinois to offer Undergraduate Certificate in Environmental Writing

The Undergraduate Certificate in Environmental Writing (CEW) is a new offering for University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign students wanting to engage the latest research in sustainability science — and to build their skills in environmental communication.

The Certificate is a joint venture of iSEE, the School for Earth, Society, and Environment, and the English Department…

The motto of the CEW is “turning data into narrative” — learning about the latest scientific research on the environment and how to communicate that research effectively to the public.