Chemicals from Air Force base seep into wells, Lake Huron

Read the full story from WBFO.

Residents near an abandoned military base in Michigan are worried about an unseen invader: toxic chemicals that have contaminated wells in the town of Oscoda. Now the chemicals are spreading farther — and have even reached Lake Huron.

 

Public Meeting on Collecting Chemical Use Information — Preliminary Summaries of Information Now Available

On February 14th, EPA will hold a public meeting to receive public input and information on uses and conditions of use for the initial ten chemicals to be evaluated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), as amended by the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act.  Information on uses and the conditions of use will assist EPA in identifying potential exposure scenarios for the ten chemicals.

In preparation for the public meeting, EPA is making available the preliminary summaries of information collected thus far on the manufacturing (including importing), processing, distribution in commerce, use, and disposal of the initial ten chemicals subject to risk evaluation under TSCA.

These documents contain publicly available information submitted to EPA, including Chemical Data Reporting and Toxics Release Inventory information, as well as information provided by a range of stakeholders the Agency consulted with, including other government agencies, states, NGOs, manufacturers, users, and from the published literature.x

The information summaries are available on EPA’s web site.

The meeting will be held on February 14, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, Polaris Room, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20004. Read more.

To participate, please register online at https://tscachemicaluse.eventbrite.comThe meeting will also be available by remote access for registered participants.  EPA has also established public dockets for those who wish to submit information.  Written comments and materials will also be accepted and should be submitted before March 15, 2017.

Read more about managing chemicals under TSCA.

Energy-Water Nexus: The Water Sector’s Energy Use

Download the document.

Water and energy are resources that are reciprocally and mutually linked, because meeting energy needs requires water, often in large quantities, for mining, fuel production, hydropower, and power plant cooling, and energy is needed for pumping, treatment, and distribution of water and for collection, treatment, and discharge of wastewater. This interrelationship is often referred to as the energy-water nexus, or the water-energy nexus. There is growing recognition that “saving water saves energy.” Energy efficiency initiatives offer opportunities for delivering significant water savings, and likewise, water efficiency initiatives offer opportunities for delivering significant energy savings. In addition, saving water also reduces carbon emissions by saving energy otherwise gene rated to move and treat water.

This report provides background on energy for facilities that treat and deliver water to end users and also dispose of and discharge wastewater. Energy use for water is a function of many variables, including water source (surface water pumping typically requires less energy than groundwater pumping), treatment (high ambient quality raw water requires less treatment than brackish or seawater), intended end-use, distribution (water pumped long distances requires more energy), amount of water loss in the system through leakage and evaporation, and level of wastewater treatment (stringency of water quality regulations to meet discharge standards). Likewise, the intensity of energy use of water, which is the relative amount of energy needed for a task such as pumping water, varies depending on characteristics such as topography (affecting groundwater recharge), climate, seasonal temperature, and rainfall. Most of the energy used for water-related purposes is in the form of electricity. Water-related energy is estimated to account for about 4% of the nation’s electricity generation, but many data gaps exist. Also, regional differences can be significant. In California, for example, as much as 19% of the state’s electricity consumption is for pumping, treating, collecting, and discharging water and wastewater.

Some EPA, State Dept climate pages changing under Trump administration

Read the full story from Michigan Radio.

Shortly after the election, researchers from the U.S. and Canada got together to start backing up scientific data from federal agencies in the U.S.

They’re also keeping a close eye on how the Trump Administration is changing federal websites, and they’re already finding some changes.

One of the groups heading up this effort is called the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative. (You can see EDGI’s report on changes to some EPA websites here, and its report on the State Department and Department of Energy here.)