Climate change threatens sweet smell of morning coffee

Read the full story at Planet Ark. Rising temperatures due to climate change could mean wild arabica coffee is extinct in 70 years, posing a risk to the genetic sustainability of one of the world's basic commodities, scientists said. Although commercial coffee growers would still be able to cultivate crops in plantations designed with the …

Large-Scale Biochar Production from Crop Residue: A New Idea and the Biogas-Energy Pyrolysis System

Shenqiang Wang, Xu Zhao, Guangxi Xing, Linzhang Yang (2013). "Large-Scale Biochar Production from Crop Residue: A New Idea and the Biogas-Energy Pyrolysis System." BioResources 8(1). Online: http://ojs.cnr.ncsu.edu/index.php/BioRes/article/view/BioRes_08_1_0008_Wang_Editorial_Large_Scale_Biochar_Crop_Residue. Abstract: Biochar is an effective means to withdraw carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere and consequently influence the trend of global climate change. However, there still are substantial …

Potential Impact of Biochar Water-Extractable Substances on Environmental Sustainability

James Weifu Lee , Cameron Smith , and Eric Buzan (2012). "Potential Impact of Biochar Water-Extractable Substances on Environmental Sustainability." ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, online ahead of print. DOI: 10.1021/sc300063f. Abstract: Application of biochar as a soil amendment could be a significant approach for carbon sequestration to possibly control climate change for energy and …

Biochar in horticulture: Prospects for the use of biochar in Australian horticulture

Download the document. Biochar in horticulture was commissioned by Horticulture Australia Ltd to help horticultural industries assess the potential of biochar for use in their crops. A team of experts have reviewed the scientific literature to provide up to date, peer- reviewed information on soil carbon science and policy, biochar production and risks, biochar’s influence …

Great Lakes legacy: Old contaminants declining; newer ones on the rise

Read the full story in Great Lakes Echo. Legacy contaminants are decreasing more quickly than previously reported in three of the Great Lakes, but have stayed virtually the same in two other lakes, according to new research. The four studies cited in this article are: Chang F, Pagano JJ, Crimmins BS, Milligan MS, Xia X, …