Atop a Manhattan Convention Center, a Harvest of Honey

Read the full story in the New York Times.

Let us begin not with the who, which was several thousand bees and a bunch of people in anti-sting gear that looked like spacesuits, or the what, which was harvesting honey. Let us go directly to the where.

It was not a bosky setting that would bring to mind the Robert Frost poemabout good fences and good neighbors, but the south roof of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center on Manhattan’s Far West Side. Here the neighbors are the unfinished towers of the Hudson Yards development. They ring what has become an urban meadow — the south roof, mostly covered by 6.75 acres of kaleidoscopic sedum. It is yellowish green. It will turn red in time for Christmas.

The bees have been in residence since spring. The first 12,000 came from California, transplanted in a three-pound container that looked like a shoe box with screens on both sides. They were placed in wooden hives, which look like stackable drawers. There were 60,000 to 80,000 by midsummer.

New spill tracker enlists crowd to help monitor pollution after hurricanes

Read the full post from Civic Hall.

The SkyTruth Spill Tracker collects pollution reports in one place and makes the information available to the public as well as the relevant authorities.

Has the Sustainable Fashion Industry Reached a Tipping Point?

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

In the world of environmental management, hearing about clothing manufacturers chasing sustainable textiles, processes, and supply chains is nothing new. But the latest annual, elite fashion-fest in the Big Apple, New York Fashion Week, may just be an indication of how far the industry has come, with the Huffington Post gushing that “sustainable fashion is the next fashionable thing.”

A cruise ship’s emissions are the same as 1 million cars: report

Read the full story from CBC Radio.

A luxury cruise vacation may sound like a perfect dream holiday, but a German environmental organization says that in terms of environmental impact, the industry is an absolute nightmare.

​Nabu has just released its annual report on cruise ship pollution. It looked at dozens of vessels travelling in Europe, and decided not to recommend any of them.

Keeping the lights on these days means planning for climate change

Read the full post at the Climate Law Blog.

Due to damage from Hurricane Irma, the lights are out in much of southern Florida—an inconvenience to many and fatal to some. Meanwhile, in Texas, power still has not been restored everywhere in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. As the Wall Street Journal headline says of both states, “Power Outage Pushes Limits.” Utilities and utility commissions in those states and others must learn the lesson these storms have to teach. It is one that New York City and the State’s Public Service Commission (PSC) learned following Hurricane Sandy: as the climate changes, electricity grids designed to deal with historical weather and temperature patterns will become less resilient and, consequently, less reliable.

5 NFL Football Stadiums Score Big on Efficiency

Read the full story from DOE.

September kicks off the start of another football season. And, while most fans will be focused on what’s happening on-the-field, there’s another storyline already forming off of it. Many NFL stadiums are scoring big on energy savings and tackling waste at the same time—adding even more value to the game day experience.